Keswick Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by mickeyboy07
  • Things to Do
    by mickeyboy07
  • Things to Do
    by mickeyboy07

Best Rated Things to Do in Keswick

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    Stone bridges

    by iandsmith Written Dec 27, 2005

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    Along with stone cottages, churches and dramatic scenery, this is what I wasted a lot of film and digital space on. Derwent Water was no exception. The first was taken not long after the Grange turnoff and the second is the bridge leading to the Grange, one of the popular accommodation spots around Derwent Water.

    Beside the Borrowdale Road Heading to the Grange
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    The MOOT HALL

    by marsistanbul Written Oct 10, 2008

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    The origins of this building are obscure.As early as 1571,there is a reference to a Court House in the market place.Tradition suggest it was built in 1695 with materials from the Earl of Derwentwater's family mansion on Lord's Island,Derwentwater.The present building dates from 1813 and has been used as a manor courthouse,a butter and fruit market,a prison,a museum and a town hall.It one-handed clock may be seen on the west end above the steps.The moot Hall now houses a well equipped Information and Accommodation Booking Centre..

    the Moot Hall
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    Ronnie Barker eat your heart out

    by iandsmith Updated Nov 4, 2010

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    It's hard not to think of the late Ronnie Barker and his offsider Jason when you see this place. Coming from the other side of the world where we have no shops (to my knowledge) with this name it really touched my mirth bone.
    I'm sure Mr. Barker would have approved.

    A bright spot
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  • a walk a round derwentwater

    by stemc Written Jan 3, 2006

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    you can have a pleasurable walk around the lake just outside keswick center the views down the lake are fantastic on the day we went cold and frosty the sky a brilliant blue that you can only get in winter

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    The taunting

    by iandsmith Updated Dec 28, 2005

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    I used to check out Bigs' Buttermere travelogue and shake my head at the stunning consistency of quality in her photos. I yearned to get just one shot like that. So it was that I booked in for three nights and got up well before dawn the first morning, eager for the best conditions.
    Unfortunately, life intervened. "Life" coming in the form of weather. Windy, drizzle, mist; you name it, it came. "Dawn", so called, came and went. When there's never any sun you just assume that when you can see further than you could a half hour previous then something must be coming up above the clouds.
    For two hours I persevered to no avail. The day failed to improve from then on.
    The opening shot was taken on the second day (see next tip).

    The seductiveness of Buttermere
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    A moot point

    by iandsmith Written Dec 27, 2005

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    So, if you're wondering what that building in the market area was, let me enlighten you.
    The history of the Moot Hall is sketchy, but there are reports of a significant building on the site as early as 1571. The current building was erected in 1813, and since then has served as a courthouse, a prison, a museum, a town hall and even a butter and fruit market!
    Some buildings just can't seem to make up their minds.
    The famous one-handed clock can be seen above the west end of the hall. The building is now home to Keswick’s Tourist Information Centre, a highly recommended place for information.

    A genuine multi-purpose building
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    All things considered

    by iandsmith Updated Dec 27, 2005

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    Just before Watendlath (where did they get that name from) there's a cute barn and some of those tri-coloured Italian cattle. Couldn't resist taking a pic.
    Picture 2 shows the very high stile I had to traverse to do my short walk. The one where I spent half a hour cringing under a lone tree and sheltering behind a small rock wall, desperately trying to keep my camera and self a little bit dry.
    The third shot shows the field flowers next to me that I shot while I was bored waiting for the weather to clear and the last one beckons the sun to reappear.

    Love those cows Has that camera gone off yet? Flowers on the hillside Dramatic weather
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    Where there are gardens, there is hope

    by iandsmith Updated Dec 27, 2005

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    Hope Park, strategically located between town centre and lake, was donated to the town in 1925 by Sir Percy Hope in a philantropic gesture. The land had once been an area for the grazing of horses, used to transport charabancs from Keswick Railway Station to the various hotels in the town.
    The Park was opened as a golf course on the 27th May 1927 by Mr J H Taylor, who was the British Golf Champion at that time.
    Golf is still played in Hope Park and is enjoyed by many thousands of people every year. There is an ever popular crazy golf course with a Lakeland theme, just perfect for family fun, plus an 18 hole putting course and a splendid 9 hole pitch and putt course, all laid out amongst the most magnificent surroundings.
    After the death of Sir Percy Hope OBE in 1974 the Hope Park Charitable Trust took over the running of the park. This magnificent park, set beside the Derwent Water, gives pleasure to all who enjoy its quiet areas and who take delight in watching the seasons change.
    SIR PERCY HOPE - a potted history
    Percy Mirehouse Hope was born in 1888, the son of a local bank manager. He had a distiguished military career in the first World War and turned down a War Office appointment to return to Keswick. A trained architect, he was closely associated with many housing and business projects. He founded the Lake District Hotels Company which, for many years, owned the Royal Oak, the Queen's and the George hotels. He served on the Urban District and County Councils, the Lake District Planning Board, the police committee and was a magistrate from 1934.
    Throughout his life he was keenly interested in sport, first as a participant and later as supporter. He played rugby and cricket for the county. For over thirty years he was master of the Blencathra Foxhounds, and a member of most organisations in the town, from Rotary Club to St John's Church, Conservative Club to school governing bodies.
    He was knighted in 1954 and lived in Brundholme Terrace, a street near the park, for most of his life.

    Signing on Not quite at its best
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    Not a place to stone the crows

    by iandsmith Updated Dec 28, 2005

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    This is, dare I use the words, a grassy knoll, adjacent to Hope Park and set aside the lake with tranquil (depending on the weather) views across Derwentwater. It's called Crow Park.
    Somehow it's nice just being there. A soothing invigorating feeling creeps over you as you take in the ever-mobile ducks, the just-offshore island and the hills beyond. Then, as you glance around you may see mist covered hills behind you brooding over the town.
    Depending on the time of the year you may see farm animals grazing here so, remember to be careful where you tread!
    It's a place to come for solace and to recharge your batteries. The best times are early mornings and dusk when the light (when it's not raining) causes subtle colour changes in the landscape and, best of all, it's free.

    Hills in the mist
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  • beautiful walks

    by zzchris Written Nov 19, 2004

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    There are loads of fantastic walks around keswick. For "coffee shop walkers" use the lake ferry and join up the paths around the lake. For the more adventurous there are many mountain walks here. The best is (arguably) Cat bells (use the ferry from Keswick) and follow the ridge until you have had enough. There are lots of ways back down. Make sure you follow the usual safety precautions for mountain walking. (If you don't know what they are don't try) and GET A MAP (£8 widely available). Make sure you do not leave without visiting Borrowdale valley. This is my favourite valley inthe world (Yosemite, Maasai Mara, Chamonix, Mattertal this is still IT).

    Borrowdale
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  • Three Things NOT to do!

    by lucia9998887 Written Jan 6, 2007

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    My family have two timeshare apartments in Underscar, for a week in July, about a mile away from keswick town. We have been going there for about 6 years so i know almost everything to do in the town, surrounding areas and places a bit further away aswell.
    The first year we went we visited all the touristy places like the beatrix potter museum a few miles down the road, derwent water etc, and we also visited 'Cars for the Stars' museum, not only is it very boring but my two young cousins found it very distressing, if that is your sort of thing fine but its a bit of a shambles in there. Next is the unsurprisingly tedious Derwent Pencil Museum, i'm very into art myself and the Derwent art products are of an excellent quality however the same can't be said for the museum itself. There is a room full of all colours, shapes and sizes of every pencil imaginable, a brief and somewhat uninteresting written description of how the pencils are made and just as you are about to doze off there is a promise ofa glimpse of the worlds largest pencil!, alas it is only a small photo.
    Both these places are very corny but possibly worth a short visit, i certainly never want to go there again.

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  • tkdqueen's Profile Photo

    Derwent Water

    by tkdqueen Written Feb 21, 2004

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    I don't know the story behind this but as we walked around Derwent Water we came across this stone bench with these words scripted into the stone.....
    "IRENES VIEW" (see pic)...................
    Scroll down to see Irenes view!!!

    IRENES VIEW

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    Cumberland Pencil Museum, Keswick

    by chizz Written Sep 3, 2008

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    The Cumberland Pencil Museum is the only attraction of it's kind in the world, dedicating itself to the history of the pencil. With Borrowdale graphite being discovered in the 1500's near to Keswick, the Cumberland Pencil Company was formed in 1832. Shepherds were thought to have discovered the graphite following a storm which uprooted trees and exposed the underlying black deposits. They originally thought it was coal, but when it would not burn they used it to mark their sheep! It's fame spread and it was used for medicinal purposes as well cannon ball moulds, before being used as a writing and drawing tool.
    At the museum, you can learn all about the history of the pencil, watch a short film and see the world's longest pencil on display. There is also a shop selling pencils and other gifts and a cafe.
    The museum is open from 9.30am-5pm and hours are extended at peak times of the year. Adult tickets cost £3/students £2 and children £1.50 with under 5's free. Family tickets cost £7.50.

    The worlds longest pencil, Cumberland Pencil Mus. Guinness World record certificate Outside the pencil museum Graphite exhibit, pencil museum

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    By the way

    by iandsmith Updated Dec 27, 2005

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    As you climb the hill to the slate mine, there's a little stream on your left. If it's not raining there may only be just a trickle in it but, if precipitation is the order of the day then you may get to see it as I did.
    As the saying goes, every cloud has a silver lining. It just depends whether you can see it or not!

    Pretty rivulet The rushing waters Autumnal tones by the road
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    A place to pig out

    by iandsmith Written Dec 27, 2005

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    We ate here a couple of times. Rosemarie doesn't return to a place unless she's wholly satisfied and, since this is one of a chain of such hotels you may consider looking them up at other places where you find them.
    It will be great when eventually you can't smoke in pubs. Despite initial reticence, it's worked in Australia.

    Another English style pub
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    • Food and Dining
    • Beer Tasting

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Keswick Things to Do

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