Lake District National Park Favorites

  • A rest on the way to Cat Bells
    A rest on the way to Cat Bells
    by barryg23
  • Ruth near Cat Bells
    Ruth near Cat Bells
    by barryg23
  • The long climb to Dale Head, High Spy behind
    The long climb to Dale Head, High Spy...
    by barryg23

Most Recent Favorites in Lake District National Park

  • nickandchris's Profile Photo

    The Langdale Valleys

    by nickandchris Updated Mar 31, 2009

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    The track down to the ford (a little flooded>)
    4 more images

    Favorite thing: Not necessarily my favourite thing, but the Langdales are certainly a beautiful part of the world. The Langdale Pass takes you over a stunningly beautiful road, from Little Langdale to Great Langdale where there is no shortage of people, all out to take in this wonderful landscape.

    The valleys takes in Skelwith Falls, Colwith Falls,Elterwater, Blea Tarn, Little Langdale Tarn and lots of intrigueing old quarry workings.

    There is a campsite (popular even in March,) a Youth Hostel and a few hotels where sustenance and vital fluids can be topped up.

    Fondest memory: Bearing in mind the valleys close proximity to Ambleside, Coniston and the main road, please be aware that this is an extremely popular area and parking can be difficult. People come here to walk one of the many footpaths, leaving cars all day, so if you arrive a bit late in the day, you'll be lucky if you can get parked.

    There are so many scenic footpaths in this area, you'll have a job deciding which to take so make sure you plan your route and have a good walking map.

    We just managed to get parked near the Three Shires Inn and had a wander down the track to the ford on the Brathay at Little Langdale. We watched some trail bikes ride through the ford, what fun!! From here, there are some superb caverns in the old quarry workings, popular with rock climbers. Unfortunately, we didn't have time to have a look but have pencilled this in for a winter's day when the area might be a little quieter. (Ha ha, it was winter, what am I talking about?)

    http://www.english-lakes.com/langdales.html

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Camping
    • Cycling

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  • barryg23's Profile Photo

    Favourite day hikes in the Lake District

    by barryg23 Written Jan 10, 2009
    A rest on the way to Cat Bells
    4 more images

    Favorite thing: There are a number of great day hikes in the Lake District, so picking a favourite isn't easy. Furthermore, I've only seen a small part of the national park, so there may well be better ones out there that I'm missing. However, the most enjoyable walk I've done so far is the Newlands Horseshoe, a 6-7 hour hike around the quiet, beautiful, and relatively little visited Newlands Valley.

    The valley lies west of Derwent Water, while the walk follows ridge routes overlooking the valley from high above. There are a couple of different possible versions of the horseshoe, but it usually includes Cat Bells, Maiden Moor and High Spy on the east side, Dale Head at the head of the valley, and then either Hindscarth or Robinson. If you have the time and energy you could include both of these, while if you are a real glutton for punishment you could also aim to include Knott Rigg, Ard Crags and Causey Pike.

    We walked the horseshoe on a crisp, clear day in January, starting with Cat Bells and ending by walking the long ridge down from Hindscarth. The views all along the way were fantastic. First off we had excellent views of Derwent Water, Skiddaw and Blencathra from Cat Bells, while later the Borrowdale Valley and the peaks to the south came into view. The summits were nicely spaced at 1.5 miles intervals so you could time your breaks for reaching the top.

    After lunch at Dale Head tarn, we faced the steepest ascent to Dale Head, the highest point of the walk, from where you have the best views of Newlands Valley. We finished by a long descent from Hindscarth - had it been summer we might have tried to include more peaks, but by the time we reached the valley floor again we were both very tired. An essential post hike stop is the Swinside Inn, one of the few pubs in the valley, at the end of the valley.

    All in all, a fantastic hike, which I would highly recommend.

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  • barryg23's Profile Photo

    Kendal Mint Cake

    by barryg23 Written Jun 3, 2007

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    Kendal Mint Cake

    Favorite thing: Anyone who has visited the Lake District will have seen (and probably tasted) Kendal Mint Cake as it’s sold in practically every shop. It’s more of a sweet than a cake and it’s ideal to take with you on a long hike in the Lakes as it’s a high energy food and, perhaps more importantly, it’s delicious. And, as it says on the back of every packet, Kendal Mint Cake was carried by Hillary and Tenzing on the first successful climb of Everest in 1953. It’s difficult to get a better recommendation than that!

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  • barryg23's Profile Photo

    Wainwright’s Books

    by barryg23 Written Jun 3, 2007

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    Favorite thing: Anyone planning on fell walking in the Lake District will find Alfred Wainwright’s books extremely useful. Even though they were published more than 40 years ago, Wainwright’s seven volume “Pictorial Guide to Lakeland Fells” is far batter than many other guidebooks on the subject, and is still surprisingly accurate, as much of the detail has remained unchanged down the years. Wainwright spent 12 years working on his books and they’ve become the standard reference on the Lake District fells.

    When we were climbing Scafell Pike from the Eskdale valley, we had two guidebooks with us. The first one vaguely described the route but it wasn’t at all obvious once we reached Sampson‘s Stones. The Wainwright book had detailed drawings and descriptions which made it much clearer. I’ve carried them on every Lakeland climb since and found them very useful.

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  • nickandchris's Profile Photo

    English Trees

    by nickandchris Written Oct 28, 2006

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    A truly impressive tree....
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    Favorite thing: A Lake District scene can often be treeless, if it's of mountains but on the lower levels and in the valleys, trees dominate. Be it pine forests or age old traditional English deciduous, I wouldn't be without them. They are just part and parcel of England and in particular, the Lake District. I often think I couldn't live in a place if it didn't have trees yet I would like to visit the Orkney Isles where the barren land holds no trees, not being able to withstand the fierce winds found there.

    Fondest memory: Our recent trip to Aira Force highlighted the beauty of an English woodland in October. The trees here had not really started to change colour and the vivid greens of the trees were spectacular.
    I believe now there is an autumn tree watch guide which explains where the best show of autumn colours can be found throughout the Lake District. I was just thrilled with the vibrant hues of green still on display in October.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • National/State Park

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  • sandysmith's Profile Photo

    Buttermere Circuit

    by sandysmith Updated Aug 21, 2006

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    4 more images

    Favorite thing: Buttermere is one of the easiest and prettiest lakes to walk around - takes about 2 hours and if you are blessed with clear weather like we were then you'll have gorgeous views and wonderful reflections of the fells and peaks. This shot is just one of many reflections :-) Please view all the pictures!

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  • eddilowe's Profile Photo

    Lake District Words

    by eddilowe Written Sep 1, 2005

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    Favorite thing: Knowing a few of these will help determining the meaning of place names:

    fell hill, mountain, or high common land
    mere lake
    holme island
    beck stream
    force waterfall
    tarn small mountain lake

    thwaite a clearing
    ghyll / gill narrow ravine or mountain stream
    hause summit of a pass
    how / howe rounded hill
    pike peak
    raise summit of a ridge
    rake natural rock passage
    wyke bay
    heaf grazing area
    garth enclosed land or field
    lath barn

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Mountain Climbing

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  • DOUGALSMUM's Profile Photo

    You will be glad you got up early

    by DOUGALSMUM Updated Jan 31, 2005

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    a great start to the day.

    Favorite thing: Although the lake district is inundated by visitors, whatever time of year you go there, with a little carefull planning you can find a (reasonably) quiet spot to yourself.
    If you get off early in the day, you can be half way round your walk before the hoardes arrive.
    Get up early and head off and you have the lake district to yourself (or so it seems)

    Fondest memory: My best memory of the lake district was on my recent visit staying in Braithwaite near keswick, during the weeks stay we had seen every kind of weather-gales (yes the ones that had brought all the trees down and closed the forests), rain, snow and sleet. On the last morning we got up very early and as soon as it got light we headed off up Barrow fell, the sun came up and got brighter and brighter-what a marvellous day! the sky was clear-you could see for miles, the views were out of this world-and all before breakfast, and the best bit was that as we were making our way down, having enjoyed the solitude looking forward to a well earned fry up, we were passing loads of people going up who were going to have to share their vantage point with the crowds .Get up early, trust me its worth it.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • sandysmith's Profile Photo

    National Park

    by sandysmith Written Jan 15, 2005

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    walking in the Lakes

    Favorite thing: The Lake District National Park within the County of Cumbria is some 30 miles in diameter, covering about 80,000 acres and has some of Englands highest mountains, for example Scafell Pike which is 3,210 feet high and also some of Englands largest lakes, for example, Lake Windermere which is 10½ miles long.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • sandysmith's Profile Photo

    Grasmere View

    by sandysmith Updated Jan 15, 2005

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    Grasmere view

    Favorite thing: From the Loughrigg Terrace there are gorgeous sweping views over Grasmere and the surrounding peaks. Grasmere itself is associated with Wordsworth and the town can be a bit too touristy for some - so get out onto the hills and see the views he loved so much.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • sandysmith's Profile Photo

    Loughrigg Summit

    by sandysmith Written Jan 15, 2005

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    we made it!

    Fondest memory: Loughriggs's strategic position close to Ambleside, Rdyal and Grasmere makes it a popular outing. The fell views, caves and lakeside path ensure there is a variety of interest in this 4 mile circular hike.
    It was an enjoyable shortish walk with ny brother Mick and sister-in-law Amy.
    See the travelogue for more info and pics.

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  • THE LAKE DISTRICT

    by sabsi Updated Jan 9, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Lake Ullswater

    Favorite thing: The Lake District in the English county of Cumbria is one of the main tourist attractions of England. It looked as if mostly English visitors come here, I haven't seen many tourists from abroad. However, I was here in April just before Easter so that might change in summer.

    Lake District consists of 17 lakes, Lake Windermere is the longest with 17 kilometres. I have been here for two days twice and saw 7 of the lakes and tarns (well I SAW more of them but only from the car so they don't count): Windermere, Ullswater, Derwentwater, Grasmere, Buttermere, Tarn Hows and Rydal

    The highest mountains of England are located here as well. The highest one is Scafell Pike with 962 metre.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Mountain Climbing
    • Water Sports

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  • margaretvn's Profile Photo

    busy, busy, busy

    by margaretvn Written Jul 4, 2004

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    Favorite thing: Do remember that this is a well loved and much visited area of the country and it can get very busy in the high season, so if you are going advance bookings for B&B's are necessary. The little towns get terribly full so parking can be a problem and little twisting roads are busy. Take care when parking on roads to view scenery and pull off the road.
    Take your time and enjoy the wonderful countryside, take time to stop and gaze out over the valleys.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Adventure Travel
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • Arm-Chair-Hero's Profile Photo

    Driving With Your Eyes Closed.

    by Arm-Chair-Hero Written Aug 18, 2003

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    1st gear please

    Favorite thing: Driving around the Lake District can be quite an experiance in more ways than one. You get the chance to take in amzing views of the mountains whilst driving through postcard villages.
    Also the roads can become very narrow and winding....some of the roads you can only fit one vehicle down and have to use passing points.
    Going back to my title for the Lakes....a hop skip and a jump.....the places here are close together, but you have to allow for slow speeds on the roads and your journey time will increase because of this.

    Fondest memory: We all agreed that one of our fondest memories was driving back from a day out on the west coast, we decided to cut through the mountains.......we had no idea that the scenery would be so dramatic........some places the car would only go in 1st gear on the hills. It was for me the most fantastic views I have seen ......anywhere.

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  • sandysmith's Profile Photo

    Loads of Lakes !

    by sandysmith Updated May 5, 2003

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    map of lakelands

    Favorite thing: There are 17 areas of water large enough to be called Lakes in the Lake District National Park: here they are listed in largest (by length)size order:

    Windermere
    Ullswater
    Coniston
    Brassenthwaite
    Thirlmere (reservoir)
    Haweswater (reservoir)
    Derwentwater
    CrummockWater
    Wastwater
    Ennerdale
    Esthwaite
    Buttermere
    Loweswater
    Grasmere
    Rydal Water
    Broother's Water
    Elterwater

    Not forgetting the beautiful Tarn How's - this is not a true lake as it was man-made in 1863 when 3 small tarns were joined by several dams.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Mountain Climbing

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