Lake District National Park Off The Beaten Path

  • St. Paul's Church, Rusland, Lake District
    St. Paul's Church, Rusland, Lake...
    by SurfaceTravel
  • Arthur Ransome's grave
    Arthur Ransome's grave
    by SurfaceTravel
  • Arthur Ransome's grave
    Arthur Ransome's grave
    by SurfaceTravel

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Lake District National Park

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    The TeaPottery

    by tvor Updated Apr 18, 2014

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    Teapots

    Keswick is a nice town, on a lake called Derwent Water. There's a community theatre here, and a nice golf course as well. And nearby one of the carparks behind the high street is a teapot factory! Not just any old teapot either, they are all delightfully imaginative teapots and they can all be used safely! The factory is on the ground floor and on the first floor above is the showroom. You can spend a long time there looking at all the different teapots and it's hard to resist buying just one!

    Note: This museum seems to have moved to North Yorkshire to Leyburn.
    Leyburn Business Park
    Leyburn
    Wensleydale
    North Yorkshire
    England DL8 5QA

    Telephone: 01937 588235

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    The Grave of Arthur Ransome

    by SurfaceTravel Written Aug 9, 2011

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    Arthur Ransome's grave
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    Arthur Ransome (1881 - 1967) was a prolific writer of children's novels, the most famous being the "Swallows and Amazons" series. Many of the stories took place around Coniston Water and there are many landmarks around that feature in the series, notably Bank Ground Farm B&B which appears as "Holly Howe" B&B and Peel Island which appears as "Wildcat Island". More details of the author's life and his books can be found at www.arthur-ransome.org.

    Arthur Ransome is buried at St. Paul's Church, Rusland. According to the church's web-site, "Arthur disovered the Church in the late 1950's whilst exploring Rusland Pool during a fishing holiday.

    "He found the churchyard one of the most peaceful places on Earth, and asked if he could be buried there under a particular tree, with the sound of the wind in the pine needles."

    It's a beautiful setting, very peaceful, great views, and indeed you can hear the pine needles rustling.

    It's a bit difficult to find, but it is on the map as Rusland with perhaps a church symbol. The address from their web-site:
    Coniston / Newby Bridge
    Map - Ordnance Survey - SD 338897

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • School Holidays
    • Farm Stay

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    Long Meg and Her Daughters

    by nickandchris Updated May 10, 2010

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    Long Meg with Nick.....
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    No, not some Cumbrian hostelry or age-old custom, but a huge Bronze-age stone circle.

    This was our third visit to this little known stone circle and we were yet again impressed at both it's size and location. We also took a look at Long Meg's poor relation, Little Meg, just a stone's throw away. Gosh, this was absolutely tiny, comparing the two.

    Long Meg and her Daughters are little known and are one of Cumbria's best kept secrets. Long Meg is over 12 feet tall and stands some distance from the rest of the stones, her daughters. Engraved on Long Meg are a cup and ring and spiral, clearly visible.
    Originally there were over seventy stones in the circle but today fifty nine are left with twenty-seven of these still standing. The stones are reputed to be uncountable, ie; the number counted is never the same!
    The best known tale tells of the circle as being a coven of witches in the 13thc. who fell under a Scottish wizard's spell which turned them all to stone. I like that idea!
    The circle is well off the beaten track, on a very minor road, signposted from the A686 and about 6.5 km. north east of Penrith, 0.5 km from Little Salkeld.
    We arrived here in the motorhome in the pouring rain and were fortunate to be able to park in one of the two very small parking areas. The grass was extremely wet so we had no intention of going off road. There is room to turn round (as the road is a dead end) if you continue towards the farm.
    While we were there, a lone woman, in the torrential rain, went round all the stones, touching each one in turn. I'm not sure of the significance of this. It is an impressive sight though and I would love to see it from the air to get a true idea of it's size.

    On our last visit, we shared the site with a couple of young women who seemed over-awed at the place. We noticed a tree had been festooned with offerings, ranging from ribbons to teddy bears. It all looked rather tacky to me, I'm not sure why people do this.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Archeology
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Hawkshead Relish Company

    by zuriga Written May 3, 2010

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    Hawkshead Relish Company

    This small shop in Hawkshead has the most delicious jams, marmelades, sauces, chutneys etc. The product is made nearby (read the website), and after tasting the wonderful things at our B&B, we rushed down to buy some for home use. Hawkshead is worth a stop, just for this good shop. Even the Queen has been there!

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining

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    Hodge Close Quarry

    by nickandchris Updated Mar 30, 2009

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    Deep quarry at Hodge Close
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    This is a disused slate quarry situated some 2 miles north of Coniston in the Tilberthwaite valley. To get there, take the Ambleside (A593) road out of Coniston and in about two miles, turn second left, sign-posted Hodge Close. The narrow road climbs and winds it's way along Yewdale Beck, finally ending at the quarry. The slag heap has been levelled, creating a flat area for parking, but much of this has now been blocked off by huge boulders of slate.

    The quarry was worked for roofing slates for nearly two hundred years, ceasing operations in 1964. The sheer open pit drops 300 ft down into the flooded workings.Naturally, the challenge of the sheer rock sides and the flooded tunnels attracts divers and climbers from miles, although diving is not officially permitted by the quarry owners, they can do so at their own risk. Certainly not for the faint hearted, as the entrance to the water is through a tunnel and then a ladder. into 30 odd metres of freezing water... Needless to say, there have been a number of nasty deaths in the quarry, mainly from divers becoming lost in the flooded tunnels.Brrrrhhhhh............

    Apart from the unguarded 300ft drop into the quarry, the mammoth spoil heaps where you park are extremely dangerous, also having precipitous drops into the valley below. Watch your children.....

    We were amazed that no such activities were in evidence whilst we were there. The area did seem popular with cyclists, walkers and even landrover safaris!

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Mountain Climbing
    • Adventure Travel

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    Birks Bridge

    by nickandchris Updated Mar 24, 2009

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    Nature at it's best...
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    This delightful packhorse bridge crosses the Duddon, way up the valley, enoute to Lakeland's highest road passes, Harknott and Wrynose and is just off the road, so doesn't involve lots of walking.

    Birks Bridge is a special haunt for us, there is something magical about this place and it holds wonderful memories of our earlier days spent swimming in the clear, deep green pools beneath the bridge.As it is further along the valley than Ulpha Bridge, another swimming spot,it is not so well known,so not as popular.As the river flows towards the bridge,,the river narrows right down, forming small waterfalls which tumble into a deep pool under the bridge, creating superb swimming. Apparently there is an underwater cave here. People jump from the high rocks and bridge, here, plummeting into the green pool below.Obviously, the more days of sunshine the water has had, the warmer?? the water. It's a few years since we've been swimming here. I'm sure you'd still get me in though!!

    On a very recent visit to the bridge, I could still feel the magic this place held for me and was relieved to find it untouched by man. Perfect nature at it's very best.

    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Newlands Valley

    by barryg23 Written Jan 10, 2009
    Robinson & Hindscarth from Newlands Valley
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    The Newlands Valley is a relatively little visited, yet beautiful part of the Lake District. Only a couple of small roads and an old mining track run through the valley, meaning you can appreciate its beauty all the better without cars passing all the time. The valley contains a few small villages, and a number of scattered farmhouses, making it a great place to hike away from the crowds.

    There are two main trails in Newlands. The best known is the ridge walk, a 6-7 hour horseshoe walk, taking in the summits Cat Bells, Maiden Moor, High Spy, and Dale Head before finishing with Hindscarth and/or Robinson. In my opinion, this is one of the best (if not the best) walks in the Lake District: the summits are nicely spread out at 1.5 mile intervals; in addition to great views of Newlands Valley, you also get great panoramas of Derwent Water, Buttermere, Borrowdale Valley, not to mention Skiddaw & Blencathra to the north.

    An easier, lower level walk in the valley is the 5 mile walk from the Car Park below Cat Bells to the village (or hamlet) of Little Town. And after all that walking, there is a great pub called Swinside Inn where you can sit back, relax and enjoy great food and beer.

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    Coast 2 Coast 2007

    by Jacquelyn_keren Written Dec 14, 2008
    Lianne organising her kit!
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    Planning

    Back in 2007 i decided my summer would not be complete if i didnt organise an adventure! Something challenging and demanding! With this in mind i roped my best friend into walking the Coast 2 Coast route from St Bees to Robin Hood's Bay. A total of around 190miles depending on where you finish. Neither of us had done anything like the distance involved in a continuous trip. We both had outdoor moutaineering experience as well as both being members of Air cadets and later on the UOTC. Map reading didnt phase us. Walking long distances with a back back was quite daunting. We decided backpacking the route was the best way because it allowed us flexibilty...and plus i have to admit we're both very competitive and thought it would make the challenge harder! Needless to say we started the planning in March 07 and aimed to start the walk at the end of July. That gave us just over 4 months to organise everything. At this point id like to mention that we live 400 miles apart. Myself in Stirling at the time studing a degree in nursing, and my friend down south in Essex! Due to this slight distance problem we met up once, devised a list, and set about planning each section alone. I was in charge of accomadation, transport to and from the route, and Lianne was in charge of getting hold of the maps and splitting the route up! (i think i had the easier job!) When June came around, we had managed to sort out route planning (even down to compiling route cards!) with different locations we could stop at, transport to and from Kirkby Stephens ( where i planned to park my car for the duration of the trip) and transport to the start of the route (packhorse) All that was left to do was sort out our kit, and ponder on taking a GPS! In regards to maps we didnt take every single map for each section of the route, we somehow printed the route off, and highlighted our waypoints. In hind sight the map reading was a big downfall of our trip!

    July

    By the time July came around the corner we were all ready to go! Our packs were complete, nicely balanced and stocked up with ceral bars and now all we needed to do was travel the 5 hours up to the lake district to start the walk. I wont bore you with all the details of our route, needless to say i never wrote a diary and i feel i would be making things up if i tried to account for every day!. What i will do is make a list of do's and dont's for anyone planning on walking this fabulous route across Engalnd! There are also some pictures to follow for anyone interested in the scenery we saw!

    Tips

    For anyone considering doing the coast to coast i would urge you to ensure you have well fitting, well worn in boots....with different pairs of thickness socks! Some days a good pair of thick walking socks makes the difference betweeen a good days walk and a bad one!

    If your prone to blisters, like i discovered, a good selection of compeed type blister pads as well as zinc oxzide tape and foam padding (cut to shape) is fantastic! The only place my feet suffered was the soles just under my toes! I didnt even know you could get blisters there!

    This walk is demanding, physically, and mentally. Be prepared! The biggest advantage you can give yourself is ensuring you are at your fittest! It really does make all the difference.

    100% invest in walking poles! I took one to save on weight and wished i had taken two! They are brilliant, and really good at taking some much needed pack weight of your knees! especially on downhill stretches!

    Take suncream if ur planning your walk in the summer! We had glorious days of intense sunshine. I think it only rained up in the lakes! typical!

    Take as much food as you can carry! My biggest regret is underestimating how much energy i would need! We both became very ill on the 3rd day due to lack of food and water! It affected us for the rest of the trip!

    If your planning on camping, allow yourself a day or two every few days for a treat in a nice YHA or B+B. The bed is well worth the extra bit of money!

    I never used gaiters on this trip! Waste of space for much needed chocolate!

    Wedid however practically live in our waterproofs in the lakes, even on sunny days we kept them on to minimise effort for short sharp downpours! My advice is to have waterproof trousers you can roll up without cutting of ur leg supply and which dont promptly fall down after a few strides! Also take a thin shell waterproof with breathing vents. Fantastic

    I have to say i had a fantastic time and im now in the process of planning my next big adventure.....The Southern upland way! needless to say there is a few things id choose to do differently!

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    Another way up Helvellyn

    by Vic5 Written Sep 2, 2008

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    View of Thirlmere.
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    I climbed Helvellyn when I was about 11 or 12 and went the most popular route, from the eastern side. This time we thought we'd have a look at the western side. We started at Swirls carpark on Thirlmere. We didn't intend on climbing the whole mountain with a 10-month-old, but went about a third of the way.

    Related to:
    • Mountain Climbing

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  • nickandchris's Profile Photo

    High and Low Dam

    by nickandchris Updated Sep 19, 2007

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    Brilliant reflections at High dam
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    One clear, bright morning Michael and I headed for High Dam at Finsthwaite. We were desperate for some fresh air and a little gentle excercise.

    I had walked this tarn many years ago with Nick and thought it time for a return, especially as the weather was right for some good photos.

    To walk from the car-park all the way round the tarn probably doesn't take forty minutes and once you've coped with the first steep part up to it, the walk is mainly level although some parts are not easy walking. Wear decent shoes as parts can be boggy.

    There are actually two dams, the lower retaining a smaller, murky tarn and the higher opening onto a pretty tarn with superb reflections from the trees and some great picnic spots. We thought it would be a wonderful place to camp but I don't suppose such activities are allowed. Certainly fires weren't.

    The dams were created to supply the nearby Bobbin Mill at Finsthwaite, which is open to the public and a fascinating place to visit.

    This walk is signposted from the minor road at Finsthwaite. Carry on up the steep hill and there is a free carpark.

    We passed a grand total of four people whilst walking. It was mid Sepember but I was suprised on such a lovely morning that we had the place almost to ourselves. And only just off the A590.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Angle Tarn

    by barryg23 Written Jun 4, 2007

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    Angle Tarn
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    It took us a long time to reach Angle Tarn but it was worth it in the end. Perhaps this area is busier during the day but when we reached it in early evening it was deserted. We spent a few minutes relaxing by the tarn before continuing our climb to Bowfell via the Ore Gap.

    Angle Tarn is a tarn below Bowfell, the sixth biggest Lake District fell, and Rossett Pike, a smaller fell. You’ll pass by the tarn if you climb Bowfell from the south , as we did, though most people approach the mountain from the east, thus missing the tarn.

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    Penrith

    by margaretvn Updated Jan 28, 2007

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    It is not so far from all the main lakes, about 15 miles from Ullswater, but the town of Penrith is worth a visit. There are some lovely little shops in the old town centre and a bit of retail therapy is always fun. The 14th century castle is lovely, it is across from the railway station. Go to St Andrew's church and see the strange hogback stones there. It is said that it is a giants grave!
    A little way north of Penrith is Little Salkeld with a Bronze Age circle, it is known as "Long Meg and her Daughters" and is made of about 70 tall stones. If you have read my other pages you will know that these circles fascinate me. Unfortunately that day was bad weather and I did not take my camera with me (it was year ago before I discovered VT now I ALWAYS have my camera with me)
    I have put Penrith here as off the beaten track because I and several friends and family members visited the Lakes many times without going to the lovely little town. Spent all our time around the lakes and never got further away!

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Archeology
    • Family Travel

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    Money Tree

    by nickandchris Updated Oct 27, 2006

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    No chance....!!!!

    If you have the pleasure of walking to Aira Force, near Glenridding and Ullswater,you may come across a strange sight. As we were walking through the woods, I saw a tree lying down. It was knobbly all over and I thought it was covered in fungi. As my companions marched on in the rain, I decided to take a closer look.It was not fungi but copper money, pennies and 2p's pushed into the trunk. Well, I say pushed, they must have been hammered in as a lot of the coins were bent over. A suprising and unusual sight. Naturally, Philip just had to have a go at pulling some coins out but alas, it was not to be. The money was well and truly firmly embedded in the tree.
    I'm not giving you directions for this except to say it was near the beginning of the walk!! Find it for yourself.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Go Ape!!!

    by nickandchris Updated Jan 31, 2006

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    At Grizedale Forest Visitor Centre a new HighWire Forest Adventure has opened. It is an extreme tree-top tarzan course of rope bridges, trapezes and zip slides at heights of up to almost 60feet off the forest floor. Definately suited to those looking for a challenge.

    Pre-booking is essential and under 18's must be accompanied by a participating adult. Min. age 10yrs.

    Open 12th - 20th Feb. incl..
    18th March - 30th Oct. incl..
    Nov. weekends only
    Dec. and Jan. closed.

    18years + £18
    10 -17years £13

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Adventure Travel
    • National/State Park

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    School Friendly

    by nickandchris Updated Jan 31, 2006

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    Setting off through the forest

    I was invited with Philip's class to take part in an eco-tourism pilot scheme, in Grizedale Forest.

    The children had to make their own homes out of what they could find in the forest. It was certainly interesting to see what they ended up with!!! They also" shopped" at a pretend shop full of items to help them in their battle for survival in the forest, both useful and unuseful items. It was incredible what some of the children decided was useful!!! An electric kettle, a picture and a water-bottle was what one group ended up with!!! I didn't fancy my chances of survival with that lot!!!!
    Eventually they got the gist that luxury and electrical items would be totally useless.........

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Eco-Tourism
    • National/State Park

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Lake District National Park Off The Beaten Path

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