Fun things to do in Cumbria

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    View of Coniston from Brantwood, the...
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    Hawkshead, Lake District
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Most Viewed Things to Do in Cumbria

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    Walk

    by cleocat Written Oct 16, 2013

    The Newby Bridge area is very quiet with only a few residences and some farms. The winding roads, going uphill will provide you with great views and a spectacular view of the little station where a steam engine trains still operates.

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    • Hiking and Walking

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    Wasdale Head Shepherds' Meet & Show

    by into-thin-air Updated Sep 12, 2012

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    In My oppinion one of the BEST days out in West Cumbria is "The Wasdale Head Shepherds' Meet and Show", I have to much information on this event to put it all into one tip so I have decided to add it as a travelogue on My Cumbria Page -- Please check it out as this really Is a Fantastic Day Out with something for Everybody !!!!
    It is always held on the second Saturday in October -- I hope to see you there !!

    Herdwick Sheep on Show - Great Gable in Background Fordson Rowcrop tractor winner of vintage class 06 Shepherds Sticks on Show Shepherds Dog on Show Best Motorcycle on Show 06
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    • Festivals
    • National/State Park

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    The Rum Story

    by into-thin-air Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    In Whitehaven you can visit The Rum Story, This is a great museum that tells the history of Whitehaven, The Jefferson Family, their links with the Slave Trade and the Rum Trade – a Great Day out

    For More details see the attached web-site

    The Rum Story
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    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Family Travel

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    Only if you are Very Lucky !!!

    by into-thin-air Updated Jan 11, 2011

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    When visiting Lakeland you will no doubt take a tour around as many lakes as you can, If you are interested in wildlife then you will be keeping your eyes open but Only if you are Very Lucky will you se what I saw in Windermere in January this year – Otters at Lakehead near Ambleside.
    So – Always make sure that you have your camera with you because you really never know what you might see.
    Good Luck
    Rob

    Otters at Lakehead Otters at Lakehead Otters at Lakehead Otters at Lakehead Otters at Lakehead
    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism
    • National/State Park

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    Talkin Tarn Country Park.

    by nickandchris Updated Sep 29, 2010

    This is in the north of the county and on a recent stay near Brampton, we took a look at Talkin Tarn.
    Our initial impression of this tarn was that it was rather uninteresting but after setting off on the circular walk of 1.3 miles around it, our minds were changed.

    The tarn covers some 65 acres and is surrounded by farmland and woodland. It was formed over 10,000 years ago from glacial action and it is believed a village lies beneath it's depths. All the way round, we noticed water bubbling on the surface in certain places and couldn't work out what was occuring. I have since read the tarn is fed by underground springs so that could explain what we saw.

    Beech and oak trees are predominant, often overhanging the water as you follow the path. Attractive wooden seats have been positioned all the way round. These all had memorial plaques on them, obviously the park was a treasured place for these folks.

    We were impressed by a couple of wooden carvings we noticed, a sausage dog type one and a lovely children's chair carved out of a whole tree trunk where the arms consisted of snakes heads!!!

    Rowing boats and sailing dinghies can be hired and regattas are held regularly.By the boats is the boathouse tearoom which serves local beers and ciders as well as snacks and ice cream.There is also a gift shop and behind here is a fenced off area dedicated to feeding birds. A camp site is also somewhere in this vicinity.

    It is a lovely place for families, the surfaced path being ideal for pushchairs as well as wheelchairs and small bikes!! And of course, there are the ducks to feed!!

    For more information on this area, please look at my Brampton page.

    Fancy a row? Reflections on the tarn. A peep at the tarn.... Beautifully sculptured chair by Talkin Tarn. Natural habitat for fungi.
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    • Family Travel
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Sailing and Boating

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    Dentdale.

    by nickandchris Updated Jul 24, 2010

    Dent village is in Dentdale, on the western slopes of the Pennines in Yorkshire, but is actually a Cumbrian village today.It owes it's origins to the Vikings who settled here in the 10th century. Today,the area exists from a life of farming and tourism as well as a few cottage industries and undoubtedly many of the properties are holiday lets or second homes.In the 18th century practically everybody knitted,men included, even in church and in the fields and socks and gloves were a big cottage industry.

    It is an immensely pretty village with it's three cobbled streets meeting by the village's two pubs, the Sun and the George and Dragon. Driving through the village is tricky in large vehicles and not encouraged.The pretty houses cling to the sides of the narrow streets with some intriguing architecture to be noted. Also in the village, is a memorial stone to Adam Sedgwick, a first class geologist born here in 1785.

    Dentdale has it's own brewery, further along the valley, at Cowgill and provides for the valley's three hostelries. The valley is even served by the rialway, with the Settle to Carlisle line stopping at England's highest station, Dent, some four miles outside the village.

    The area is hugely popular with walkers and cyclists with the Dalesway long distance path running the length of the valley. For the not so ambitious, there are many walks along the banks of the River Dee, a tributary of the Lune, which runs through Dentdale.

    Accommodation is provided on three campsites, a Camping Club certified site (5 units only), a hostel and B&B's.

    For more info on this area, please look at my Dent page.

    Camping at Dent. Typical scenery Dent village Out in the wilds, Dent station. Dent Head viaduct on the Settle/Carlisle railway
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    • Camping
    • Cycling
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Dentdale.

    by nickandchris Updated Jul 24, 2010

    Dent village is in Dentdale, on the western slopes of the Pennines in Yorkshire, but is actually a Cumbrian village today.It owes it's origins to the Vikings who settled here in the 10th century. Today,the area exists from a life of farming and tourism as well as a few cottage industries and undoubtedly many of the properties are holiday lets or second homes.In the 18th century practically everybody knitted,men included, even in church and in the fields and socks and gloves were a big cottage industry.

    It is an immensely pretty village with it's three cobbled streets meeting by the village's two pubs, the Sun and the George and Dragon. Driving through the village is tricky in large vehicles and not encouraged.The pretty houses cling to the sides of the narrow streets with some intriguing architecture to be noted. Also in the village, is a memorial stone to Adam Sedgwick, a first class geologist born here in 1785.

    Dentdale has it's own brewery, further along the valley, at Cowgill and provides for the valley's three hostelries. The valley is even served by the rialway, with the Settle to Carlisle line stopping at England's highest station, Dent, some four miles outside the village.

    The area is hugely popular with walkers and cyclists with the Dalesway long distance path running the length of the valley. For the not so ambitious, there are many walks along the banks of the River Dee, a tributary of the Lune, which runs through Dentdale.

    Accommodation is provided on three campsites, a Camping Club certified site (5 units only), a hostel and B&B's.

    For more info on this area, please look at my Dent page.

    Camping at Dent. Typical scenery Dent village Out in the wilds, Dent station. Dent Head viaduct on the Settle/Carlisle railway
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    • Hiking and Walking
    • Cycling
    • Camping

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    Kendal Overnight or Pause.

    by alectrevor Written Jul 15, 2010

    Kendal Cumbria is a good place to stay for visiting the lake district if you don"t want the bussle of loads of other tourists. I stayed at the County Hotel. Kendal has a train service to Windermere town on the branch line . From Kendal bus station in town buses go to Keswick via Grasmere and Windermere, also Barrow in Furness. This town is the place to buy Kendal Mint Cake, White or Brown, it is not a cake more a confection or biscuit. made localaly in Kendal by Romneys.

    Kendal Kendal Kendal

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    Englands Outpost Carlisle

    by alectrevor Updated Jul 15, 2010

    Carlisle is one of Englands oldest cities near the Scottish border. It is an English outpost NOT in the Doomsday book. It has a castle and Cathedral and good shops including the Lanes a covered area of shops. Carlisle is on the main West Coast railway line, with a line across to Newcastle and the Cumbrian Coast line to Barrow in Furness. Carlisle is handy for exploring the Hadrians Wall Country and the Lake District.

    Citadel Castle English street Carlisle Cathedral founded in 1122 AD

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    Wordsworth Country Grasmere.

    by alectrevor Updated Jul 15, 2010

    Grasmere is a lakeland village where William Wordsworth is buried. The bus from Kendal to Keswick stops in Grasmere number 555.. In summer an opentop bus runs from Bowness, The place is lovely, be aware there are no footpaths you walk on side of the road. Gingerbread is a local treat.

    Grasmere Grasmere church William Wordsworth grave

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    Walk, Sail, or just Look.

    by alectrevor Updated Jul 15, 2010

    The English Lake District is in the county of Cumbria and is beautiful. The largest lake is lake Windermere , the busiest resort is Bowness , which is at lakeside, the town of Windermere is about one and half miles from the waterside. There are regular buses around the district in summer [ not so many in winter]. The town of Windermere has a railway station to Kendal and on to main line.

    Bowness Lake Windermere

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  • nickandchris's Profile Photo

    Kirkby Stephen

    by nickandchris Updated Jul 1, 2010

    Kirkby Stephen lies at the head of the Eden Valley (which used to be in the old county of Westmorland but is now part of Cumbria)on the A685 and is on the edge of the Lake District.The Pennines, Swaledale in Yorkshire and the Howgill fells are all close. It is a market town, it's charter granted in 1361 and market days are held on Mondays. Much of it's main road offers parking in cobbled bays.Today's industry is mainly from farming and tourism. The closest large towns are Penrith and Kendal.

    Kirkby Stephen has an unusually large parish church, known as the cathedral of the Dales. We were amazed at it's size and had no idea of it's existence. Entrance is via the cloisters, built in 1810 to provide shelter for church goers and market people.

    Kirkby Stephen's station is half a mile out of town where the re-opened Settle to Carlisle railway line runs.

    We noticed plenty of fish and chip shops, cafes and pubs but were warned that all the "chippies" close by 7.30pm.

    Along with B&B's and hotels, there is a youth hostel and a caravan site.

    The area surrounding Kirkby Stephen offers ideal walking opportunities, both for the fit and not so fit. The famous Coast to Coast walk passes through here.

    For more on this area, please look at my Kirkby Stephen page.

    Cloisters, Kirkby Stephen Parish church, Kirkby Stephen Kirkby Stephen Town from the cloisters Very fitting....!
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    • Food and Dining
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    • Religious Travel

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    Giant Carboot Venue.

    by nickandchris Updated Jul 1, 2010

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    During the summer,large car boot sales/market are held on the old airfield in Flookburgh, a few miles from Grange-over-Sands. I think they begin at easter and are held Bank Holidays up to July, then weekly until October.

    Like most of these giant car boots, there are those stalls that are there every week, which we tend to avoid. They generally overprice items. The real bargains are found on the stalls where folks have just had a once a year clear out and generally just want rid of stuff.

    Some days we can come away with absolutely nothing, other times we strike lucky.What we refuse to do is pay over 50p for a paperback and even that is our top whack. For that price, it has to be a book we've been searching for!

    This venue gets busy during the school holidays with the caravan site providing a lot of custom. Always plenty of children about.

    At this sale, there are plenty of snack vans and places for a coffee. Oh, and there's always an ice cream van! Usually there are small quad bikes to ride on and a large inflateable Titanic bouncy castle.

    A couple of portaloos are on hand for anyone who gets desperate.

    The good thing is pitches are all on a hard surface so no mud involved for either sellers or buyers!

    If the weather is calm, you'll be able to watch the planes taking off and the parachutes land. It's quite exciting.

    Cark carboot entertainment. Titanic at cark.
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • School Holidays

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    The Maize Maze

    by nickandchris Updated Jul 1, 2010

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    This was a new attraction for this year, a field of maize turned into a tourist maze. It's actually only part of the huge field., thank goodness otherwise we could have been in there for ever!!!
    You are given a very short brief on things not to do and given a flag to stick up above the maize, in emergencies.

    There are various posts with quiz boards along the way. The idea is the children do one quiz and adults the other. We didn't find all the clues and weren't inclined to look any longer, having been going round in circles for an hour or more and in the drizzle.

    You can buy a map to help you find your way out, for £1, which is refundable if you don't open it. There are three manned bridges where you can buy expensive drinks and the map if you haven't already obtained it, and also get a view of the maze from to try and get your bearings. This didn't help us a great deal but after much family argueing we did eventually get out with our map unopened. Yes, it's a good place for rows, everyone thinks they know the way but no-one does!!!

    There are some game type mazes and giant games to try, once you've "done" the maize, pedal tractors and go-carts and other entertainment for small children. Also in a field are some alpaccas which reminded me of giant poodles!!!

    The maize is created by Adrian Fisher who seems to be an old hand at this sort of thing :www.maizemazes.com

    We thought the admission charge was steep (check web site)and goods they were selling were a definite rip off.

    Lakeland Maze Deep in the maize maze Lost..... Finding our bearings in the maze Poodle or Alpacca?
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    • Farm Stay

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    Beaches

    by nickandchris Updated Jul 1, 2010

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    Cumbria has miles of coastline, mainly sandy. Most of it is huge swathes of sand and pebbles with rock pools at low tide. Views extend to the Isle of Man, the Solway Firth and Scotland and on a go9od day, to Ireland.
    Due to the nature of the county, we also have coastal estuaries with mud flats and sinking sand. These are a haven for birds and popular with ornothologists .The tides sweep into the estuaries, sometimes with an actual bore and they can be dangerous places if you are not keeping an eye open for the tide. This often results in people being stranded and the coastal rescue services put into action.
    The Coast to Coast Walk begins in northern Cumbria, at the pretty beach of St. Bees.There are lovely views from St. Bee's Head.
    In summer the beaches attract families, out for picnics and general seaside fun. Even windsurfing is popular on wild days, we've seen the enthusiasts in the middle of winter togging themselves up as the rain lashes down and the wind howls around. Not for me, thankyou.
    Fishing is big on certain stretches of coast. I must admit we've never caught anything worthwhile from the beach but people do. Morecambe Bay is renowned for it's flukes, a flat fish caught in nets out on the sands and sold locally.
    Boating is becoming more popular now Windermere has a speed limit. People need somewhere to use their boats and the coast seems like a reasonable alternative.

    Cumbria's coast Cumbria's coast Estuary walking One of Cumbria's estuaries Views to the lakeland mountains
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    • Beaches
    • Fishing

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Cumbria Hotels

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