Bakewell Things to Do

  • Old Market Hall
    Old Market Hall
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  • Church Of All Saints
    Church Of All Saints
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  • Church Of All Saints
    Church Of All Saints
    by Balam

Most Recent Things to Do in Bakewell

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    All Saints church

    by leics Written Oct 22, 2013
    All Saints
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    Many, many English churches are very ancient indeed, and All Saints is no exception.

    In fact, it is older than many because it dates largely from the 1200s, although there are traces o fits earlier 1000s (Norman) building as well, as well as changes made during the 1300s...including the spire. The original spire had to be replaced in 1840 because it had become dangerous....but the fact that it lasted more than 400 years is a testament to the skill of those 14th-century masons and builders (remember...they used wooden scaffolding!).

    There is a truly lovely alabaster monument in the church, dating from the 1300s and very rare. It shows Sir Geoffrey Foljambe and his wife, Avena...and Irish woman whom, i suspect, was rather beautiful.

    The font dates from the 1300s too; even though it is much worn it is the best example of a 14th century font in Derbyshire. And there are some fascinating tombs too: Sir Geoffrey Manners and his wife from the 1600s, Sir Thomas Wendesley (killed at the Battle of Shrewsbury in 1403), Sir George Vernon and his wives, from the 1500s........

    The choir stalls, although beautifully-carved, mostly date from the 1800s, although they incorporate some Medieval bits and pieces (including three 15th-century misericords).

    For anyone who has even the slightest interest in history this is definitely a church worth exploring.

    The church is normally open from around 9.00am until 4.45pm in the summer and 3.45pm in the winter.

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    All Saints...in the churchyard (and porch).

    by leics Written Oct 22, 2013

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    The Anglo-Saxon cross
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    All Saints is perched on a hill above the Wye...very sensible, given the tendency of rivers to flood! It's a very ancient Christian site: there was certainly a church there by 800, and quite possibly by the 680s. Those buildings were largely, if not entirely, wooden, of course, and are known mainly through archaeology and historical documents.

    The Danes invaded in the 800s and many churches were plundered, It is probable that Bakewell was one of these, for a new building was constructed in 849. The church was rebuilt in the Norman style in the early 1100s but the building you see today dates mostly from the 1200s and 1300s, with just a few traces of that 1100s building still visible.

    All Saints' churchyard is special not only for its rather lovely views across the valley but also for its two very ancient crosses. Neither of them were originally in the churchyard. It was usual for such crosses to be placed to mark parish boundaries (I have taken photos of some ancient ones still in their correct places....see my St Buryan tip) or, sometimes, placed to mark special events.

    The Anglo-Saxon cross still has its cross as well as its shaft. It dates from at least the 900s and maybe earlier. It stood on a trackway near Bakewell and was brought to the churchyard about 1600. On one side its carvings show Norse gods such as Woden, on the other there are Christian carvings.

    The Anglo-Scandinavian cross-shaft dates from the 1000s and was found in the River Derwent, near Beeley. One side shows a Norse mask, another a symbol for the Holy Trinity and all sides are covered in intricate spirals and interlacing curves.

    It is rare to find such ancient stone-carvings...the trek up to the church is worthwhile for those alone. But there is more to see. The porch of the church is filled with lovely carved stones, many of which are graveslabs. Those on one side are from the Medieval period, on the other are stones from the Norse and Anglo-Saxon period (with yet more intricate and interlacing designs).

    I don't think I've seen another church with such a wealth of ancient stonework on display....don't miss it!

    The church is normally open from around 9.00am until 4.45pm in the summer and 3.45pm in the winter.

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    • Archeology

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    Enjoy the architecture and find the almshouses.

    by leics Written Oct 13, 2013

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    Sideways cottages........
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    Bakewell's centre has a goodly chunk of older buildings and it really is a most pleasant place to explore. Even if many of those older buildings have now been turned into shops and cafes of one sort or another their original features remain and give a good idea of how the town once looked, long before it became a popular place for visitors.

    Much of the town's Medieval street layout remains...you can tell by the narrow side-streets, small alleyways and odd curves and bends.

    Walk from the town centre towards the church and you'll pass a row of rather lovely almshouses. Almshouses were for the elderly poor of the parish (usually only the 'good' ones), built by wealthy locals as a 'moral' act. The row in the photo dates from 1709. The original building was created in 1602 and was funded by one John Manners. Don't let the plain name mislead you...the Manners family were the Dukes of Rutland (next door to Leicestershire) and were certainly not short of money. The building had 6 tiny houses but, after falling into almost-dereliction by 2001, it has been restored and now has only 3 homes. Modern expectations are so much higher than those in the 1700s!

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    Monsal Head

    by Balam Written Sep 30, 2013

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    Monsal Head
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    Monsal Head is a great place to stop on the way back towards Manchester from Bakewell, there is a fantastic view as well as a pub bar an a cafe. we stopped on the way back after passing it on the way there and seeing how good it looked,
    The views are great, it was once a stop for the train and pack horses would bring people up to the pub which was then called the Railway Arms.sadly that station is no longer there and the pub and Stables Bar exists because of people passing by.

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    Old House Museum

    by Balam Updated Sep 30, 2013

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    The Old House Museum is a great place to visit, i'm really sorry that we did not have the time to go in but i will definitely call in next time i visit.

    Family Ticket £10 (2 Adults, up to 3 children 5-16yrs)
    Adults £3.50
    Children £2
    Children under 5 FREE
    NEW- Hill of History Guided Walk around Bakewell Town £4
    Private guided tours for groups by arrangement until begining of December
    Opening Times
    11.00am - 4.00pm Daily (Last visitor entrance 3.30pm) 29th March – 5th November 2013
    Email: bakewellmuseum@googlemail.com

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    Bakewell Church

    by Balam Written Sep 30, 2013

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    Church Of All Saints
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    The Church Of All Saints is a fantastic building on a hill high above the old town of Bakewell, The Steeple was constructed in the 1840s and can be seen from miles around, Most of the churches early elements are Norman but the arch piercing wall between the nave and south isle is thought to be of Saxon origin.The west front dates from the 12c and its larges window helps to flood the building with light.

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    Tourist Information

    by Balam Written Sep 27, 2013

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    Old Market Hall
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    A good place to start is the Tourist Information, It is situated in the Old Market Hall which dates from the early 17th century, It is operated jointly by the Peak National Park Authority and Derbyshire Dales District Council, It has a lot of information on the area as well as a nice selection of souvenirs and gifts.
    There is a photography gallery located upstairs on the mezzanine floor

    Mon 1 Apr 2013 - Thu 31 Oct 2013 Mon - Sun 09:30 to 17:00

    Fri 1 Nov 2013 - Mon 31 Mar 2014 Mon - Sun 10:30 to 16:30

    follow on twitter @peakinfocentres

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  • suvanki's Profile Photo

    All Saints' Parish Church

    by suvanki Written Sep 8, 2013

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    All Saints' Parish Church
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    I've been meaning to have a look around this historical church for a long time, and managed to have a quick peep during my recent visit. A lady was waiting to close the church, but let me have a few minutes to wander around.

    I bought an information leaflet for 20p - there is a more in depth book for £2.

    So, before entering the church (where there is a warning notice that there are six steps into the church), the South porch has some interesting features - Carved stones and ancient grave covers that are dated from pre-1066! The stones on the Right are thought to have come from the original Saxon church, while the grave covers on the left date from some time after the Norman conquests to the 1400's

    An informative display board points out the possible occupations of the deceased. A carved key might indicate a blacksmith, bailiff or constable, Shears- a Wool Merchant or Farmer, a Chalice? Maybe a Priest.

    The South Porch was added to the church in the 1400's. Dating back to Anglo Saxon times, the church has been re-built and renovated over the centuries. CLICK HERE FOR HISTORY OF THE CHURCH

    At the foot of the steps is an impressive covered font that dates back to the 14th Century, which Pevsner decreed was 'The Finest of its kind in the county'

    to be continued......

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    Farmers Market

    by suvanki Updated Sep 8, 2013

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    River Wye, Bakewell

    These markets are usually held on the last Saturday of the month,

    Open 0900 - 1400hrs. Free admission

    If you like your food, this is a Must Do!!!

    Indoors, with a few stalls outside, a wide variety of locally produced foods and crafts, spread through 3 halls.
    Only products produced, raised, baked or caught locally (30 mile radius) are displayed.

    Some stalls have tasters!! I tried a sip of ale, chutneys on crackers, balsamic vinegars and flavoured oils on pitta, and a christmas fruit pie, which was delicious!

    The mushroom stall seemed to be the most popular when I visited, with queues stretching around the table..a wide variety of funghi, at various prices.

    Vegetables, meat, fish, cheeses, oils, vinegars, real ales, pies, chutneys, jams, breads etc of high quality, plus soaps/pot pourri, carved wood trinkets, basket work, furniture and a lot more besides!

    A cafe serves hot/cold snacks. Outside, there was a pancake stall.

    Related to:
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    • Beer Tasting
    • Food and Dining

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    THE RUTLAND ARMS

    by alyf1961 Written Mar 25, 2013

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    The hotel stands on the site of an earlier hotel “The White Horse”. This hotel was built after the old hotel was demolished in 1804 and named after the seventh Duke of Rutland.
    The Bakewell pudding is said to have originated here, after a customer ordered a strawberry tart, the cook instead of pouring the egg mixture into the pastry she poured it over the jam. The customer loved the pudding and it became a firm favourite.

    Jane Austen is said to have stayed in room 2 of the hotel whilst visiting nearby Chatsworth house.

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    RIVER WYE

    by alyf1961 Written Mar 25, 2013

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    The River Wye is 15 miles long and it flows from the River Trent to the North sea at the Humber.
    The Wye is rich in trout and grayling fish. Ducks, geese and swans line the river at Bakewell and it is a lovely place to sit and watch the world go by.

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    ALL SAINTS CHURCH

    by alyf1961 Written Mar 25, 2013

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    CHURCH OF ENGLAND
    ALL SAINTS DAY 1st November.
    A grade I listed building. The original church was founded here in 920.
    William the Conquerer granted the manor of Bakewell to William Peverel. Peverel built a new church in 1110, some of this church is still visable in the round arches of the west wall.
    In the mid 13th Century the church was extended and modernised. The tower and spire were built at this time.
    In the early 1800’s the church was in a poor state. The spire began to crack and the whole church needed repairing.
    The present church was rebuilt in the 1840’s. The stained glass was replaced during the late 19th Century. The Henry Holiday “lamb of god” window in the North aisle is worth a look.
    There are two Anglo-Saxon crosses in the churchyard.
    The church is still being renovated and the tombs of Sir John Manners and his family, also Sir George Manners and his wife are on display in a side aisle.
    The oldest Saxon stones in the UK are in this church and are at the moment in the process of being displayed within the church.

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    Chatsworth House

    by Gillybob Written Jul 22, 2012

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    House gardens
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    This stately home is situated just 3½ miles northeast of Bakewell and is the home of the Duke of Devonshire, having been in the family since 1549.

    Chatsworth House offers plenty of opportunities for the visitor. You will find lots of small car parks in the public accessible parts of the extensive grounds and parklands. Parking near the house itself costs £3 for the day.

    There are a variety of access tickets for the house, gardens, farmyard and adventure playground with discount offered if purchased in advance online.

    The house itself has featured in a number of films and TV productions, including the 2005 production of Pride and Prejudice, it is also named within the novel as one of the estates that Elizabeth Bennet visited prior to Pemberley.

    The extensive website below contains excellent information to assist in planning your visit.

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    National Park Visitor Centre

    by Gillybob Written Jul 15, 2012

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    National Park Visitor Centre

    If Bakewell is your first stop within the Peak District National Park, then a visit to the town's Visitor Centre is a must. An excellent source of information and leaflets on all the sights around the Peak District National Park, you will find this Visitor Centre an excellent aid to planning your visit.

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    The Bakewell Show

    by colin_bramso Updated Sep 10, 2011

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    Magnificent horses, historic wagons
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    All over rural Britain, agricultural/horticultural shows are held through the summer. It's worth checking if there's one where you're visiting because they give a great insight into country life, and are an interesting and fascinating day out.

    The Bakewell Show, now over 100 years old, is held on the first Wednesday & Thursday of August each year. It's a good example of the traditional shows with all kinds of farm animals, and pets, being entered into competitions for 'best of breed', competitive events, demonstrations.

    Competitions are also held for fruit, vegetables, flowers, cooking of cakes and jams, owners parade their restored historic farm vehicles, there are market stalls, sideshows, food stalls - everything for a good day out in the country.

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