Bakewell Things to Do

  • Old Market Hall
    Old Market Hall
    by Balam
  • Church Of All Saints
    Church Of All Saints
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  • Church Of All Saints
    Church Of All Saints
    by Balam

Most Recent Things to Do in Bakewell

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    Livestock market

    by colin_bramso Updated Sep 10, 2011

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    Every Monday there's a livestock auction at the new Agricultural Business Centre, just a couple of minutes walk across the river from the town centre.

    Here you'll find local farmers selling and buying their cattle and sheep, and a large number of tourists and locals looking on from the public galleries.

    It's an interesting experience and well worth spending a while watching the activity.

    Bakewell livestock auction Bull for sale

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    TOURIST INFORMATION - NOW THAT'S HISTORIC

    by DAO Updated Aug 23, 2009

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    The helpful Tourist Information Office in Bakewell is housed in the historic Old Market Hall. There has been a Market on Mondays in Bakewell since 1330 when farmers from the hillsides have brought in livestock and produce. The Market Hall is old, but not that quite that old. It was only built in the 1600’s. This building was originally open sided and has served as everything from a wash-house to a dance hall and library. The stone carved coats of arms of the ancestors of the Dukes of Rutland are still visible. The most remarkable feature is the wooden roof beams all made by hand.

    There is a lot of good information on the Peak District National Park as well as Bakewell itself.

    Opening times are:
    Easter until 31 October 9:30am - 5:30pm
    1 November until Easter 10:00am - 5:00pm

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Backpacking
    • National/State Park

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    A sign of a clean river

    by raquelitalarga Updated Jul 2, 2008

    The River Wye flows through the centre of the town and attracts many tourists because it's a traffic free, pretty area. Benches are provided to enjoy a picnic or chips or a Bakewell pudding. The swans and ducks fight over the leftovers and the HUGE fish hoover up what sinks to the bottom. However wander a little further along the river and discover a pretty walk through the meadows (near our B&B on my accomodation tip). Eventually you come to another mediaeval bridge (only wide enough for pedestrians and animals) and an ancient pen for sheep dipping. The banks of the streams that feed the river here have a population of water voles but you need to be quiet and have your camera ready as they are very shy.
    *These are endangered creatures and there is a website to report where and when you sighted them. I'll update with info.

    A Bakewell swan A Derbyshire trout river A couple of miles out of town
    Related to:
    • Fishing
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Backpacking

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    Bakewell Church

    by Britannia2 Updated May 5, 2008

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    I do not normally put churches in my things to see list but this beautiful church is an exception.The present church was started in late Norman style in the 12th century but only the West front and part of the North and South arcades of the nave survive from this period; the rest was built from 1220-40, with the spire added in 1340. A drastic renovation in the 1840s was almost a rebuilding - the spire, which was in danger of collapse, was completely rebuilt along with the central portion of the church.
    The church is open through the day and there is no charge for admission.

    Bakewell Church

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    Monsal Head

    by Britannia2 Written May 5, 2008

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    A few miles north of Bakewell (through Ashford on the Water) is the view point at Monsal Head. The photo shows the view and his is on eof the most photographed views in the Peak. There are many walks starting here in to Monsal Dale and there is a large car park (you have to pay to park in the long stay but not the short stay) and a large pub that sells meals and also a cafe /gift shop.
    The viaduct used to carry the London to Manchester (via Derby) Midland main line but this line closed in 1968. The track bed is protected by the council for possible reopening as part of the Peak Rail service that currently just runs north from Matlock for a few miles.

    Monsal Head
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Seniors

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    THE OLD ORIGINAL BAKEWELL PUDDING SHOP

    by DAO Updated Mar 6, 2008

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    Fancy a tart or pudding? They do both actually. This is a nice little shop that also serves as a tea room and gift shop. You can select from a huge variety of cakes and puddings, not just the famous ones. They also have gourmet coffees, teas, chocolates and other goodies. Throw in a few handicrafts and you have a place worth having a peek at. They also ship famous Bakewell Puddings – worldwide. If you don’t believe me, go to the town Post Office at 5 o’clock!

    Their website listed below has more information, prices and availability.

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining
    • Family Travel
    • Women's Travel

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    Walks along the riverside

    by suvanki Updated Jan 13, 2008

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    The riverside is a pleasant place to stroll, with plenty of seats to stop and people watch.

    A wide variety of waterfowl can be spotted along the river, especially near the weir where they are sure of a snack of bread from the many visiting families who encourage their youngsters to feed the birds.

    Bakewell originated around the west bank of the River Wye, as there was a ford.

    Downstream from the bridge leads to recreation grounds, while upstream, you can see Holme Hall (which dates from 1626) and Holme Bridge (1664) before arriving at the site Arkwrights Mill stood on before it was burnt down in 1868. (The mill was opened in 1777, and this event probably provided valuable income and a resultant increase in the towns prosperity, so by the 19th Century much building work and expansion of Bakewell had occured)

    Bakewell bridge and weir
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Family Travel

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    DUCK WALK

    by DAO Updated Jan 5, 2008

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    To truly visit Bakewell you either need a piece of bread, a dog, or both. Either way you will be seeing lots of ducks. Start outside the Co-op Grocery Store on Granby Street. You are about to see every kind of Duck there is. And there are a few Geese and Swans as well!

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Road Trip
    • Birdwatching

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    Monsal Head Viaduct

    by stevezero Written Jan 31, 2005

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    The viaduct spans the gorge of the River Wye, just after the railway used to emerge from the 500m long Headstone Tunnel.
    Now much restored, the viaduct forms part of the Monsal Trail and offers wonderful views of the Monsal Dale for anyone walking accross it.

    Monsal Head Viaduct
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

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    Monsal Dale

    by stevezero Written Jan 31, 2005

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    Monsal Dale is one of the most scenic dales, of the Peak District, Derbyshire.
    It is situated some 9 kms from Bakewell and offers some splendid walks.
    A main railway from London to Manchester ran along the valley until 1968. The viaduct which carried it over the River Wye still remains and is a listed monument. It now forms part of the Monsal Trail.

    Monsal Dale, Derbyshire
    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Hiking and Walking
    • National/State Park

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    The Old Original Bakewell Pudding Shop

    by stevezero Written Jan 31, 2005

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    Bakewell is famous for its tarts, or more correctly, pudding.
    The Old Original Bakewell Pudding Shop is set in a 17thC building, and still sells them made to the original recipe.
    They also sell all manner of other confections.

    The Old Original Bakewell Pudding Shop
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Food and Dining
    • Historical Travel

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    The Rutland Arms Hotel

    by stevezero Updated Jan 31, 2005

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    The Rutland Arms Hotel is the historical home of the Bakewell Pudding. It was here in the 19thC that a kitchen maid missunderstood the instructions for a strawberry tart, put the egg mixture on top, and the town never looked back.

    The Rutland Arms Hotel, Bakewell
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Food and Dining
    • Road Trip

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    Parish Church Of All Saints

    by stevezero Updated Jan 31, 2005

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    The Parish Church Of All Saints, with its octaconal tower and elegant spire dominates the landscape of the town. it attracts the eye from almost any direction in town.

    The church was founded in 920 and although parts are Norman, most of the modern building dates from the 13th century and it was virtually rebuilt in the 1840s. It contains many interesting monuments and is well worth a visit.

    Parish Church Of All Saints, Bakewell
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel

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    Market Hall

    by stevezero Written Jan 31, 2005

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    The Market Hall, adjourns what was once the main market place for Bakewell.
    Bakewells right to hold a market dates back to 1330.
    The building has now been restored and houses the National Park and Tourist Information Centre

    Market Hall, Bakewell, Derbyshire
    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

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    Haddon Hall

    by stevezero Written Jan 31, 2005

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    Haddon Hall is one of a handfull of 12thC fortified manor houses that still exist more or less intact in the UK.
    The approach to the hall is via a 16thC bridge over the river Wye.
    The hall has been added to over the years, but there have been little alterations since the time of Henry VIII.
    The ancestral home of the Dukes of Rutland, the house is often used for the shooting of period costume dramas.
    There are guided tours around the Hall, which are well worth taking. The property is noted for its tapestries and woodcarvings. The gardens, through which the visitor exits from the house tour, are noted for their many varieties of rose, and for its many old fashioned flowers and herbs

    Haddon Hall, Bakewell, Derbyshire
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Architecture

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