Bakewell Things to Do

  • Old Market Hall
    Old Market Hall
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  • Church Of All Saints
    Church Of All Saints
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  • Church Of All Saints
    Church Of All Saints
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Best Rated Things to Do in Bakewell

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    Haddon Hall

    by stevezero Written Jan 31, 2005

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    Haddon Hall, Bakewell, Derbyshire

    Haddon Hall is one of a handfull of 12thC fortified manor houses that still exist more or less intact in the UK.
    The approach to the hall is via a 16thC bridge over the river Wye.
    The hall has been added to over the years, but there have been little alterations since the time of Henry VIII.
    The ancestral home of the Dukes of Rutland, the house is often used for the shooting of period costume dramas.
    There are guided tours around the Hall, which are well worth taking. The property is noted for its tapestries and woodcarvings. The gardens, through which the visitor exits from the house tour, are noted for their many varieties of rose, and for its many old fashioned flowers and herbs

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    Farmers Market

    by suvanki Updated Sep 8, 2013

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    River Wye, Bakewell

    These markets are usually held on the last Saturday of the month,

    Open 0900 - 1400hrs. Free admission

    If you like your food, this is a Must Do!!!

    Indoors, with a few stalls outside, a wide variety of locally produced foods and crafts, spread through 3 halls.
    Only products produced, raised, baked or caught locally (30 mile radius) are displayed.

    Some stalls have tasters!! I tried a sip of ale, chutneys on crackers, balsamic vinegars and flavoured oils on pitta, and a christmas fruit pie, which was delicious!

    The mushroom stall seemed to be the most popular when I visited, with queues stretching around the table..a wide variety of funghi, at various prices.

    Vegetables, meat, fish, cheeses, oils, vinegars, real ales, pies, chutneys, jams, breads etc of high quality, plus soaps/pot pourri, carved wood trinkets, basket work, furniture and a lot more besides!

    A cafe serves hot/cold snacks. Outside, there was a pancake stall.

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    Walks along the riverside

    by suvanki Updated Jan 13, 2008

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    Bakewell bridge and weir

    The riverside is a pleasant place to stroll, with plenty of seats to stop and people watch.

    A wide variety of waterfowl can be spotted along the river, especially near the weir where they are sure of a snack of bread from the many visiting families who encourage their youngsters to feed the birds.

    Bakewell originated around the west bank of the River Wye, as there was a ford.

    Downstream from the bridge leads to recreation grounds, while upstream, you can see Holme Hall (which dates from 1626) and Holme Bridge (1664) before arriving at the site Arkwrights Mill stood on before it was burnt down in 1868. (The mill was opened in 1777, and this event probably provided valuable income and a resultant increase in the towns prosperity, so by the 19th Century much building work and expansion of Bakewell had occured)

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    Chatsworth House

    by stevezero Written Jan 31, 2005

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    Chatsworth House, Derbyshire

    Chatsworth House is probably the top tourist attraction in Derbyshire.
    In is sited in a magnificent setting, overlooking the River Derwent, with majestic gardens containing huge water features.
    The house is also rich with art and treasures.
    The present palladian style mansion was built by the first Duke of Devonshire in 1707.
    Many outstanding rooms are contained within the house, perhaps the finest being the dining room in the north wing.
    The extensive gardens originally laid out by Capability Brown were later extensively changed by Sir Joseph Paxton, who constructed the Emperor Fountain, with it's gravity fed jet of water 290 ft high.
    Also at Chatsworth are a gift shop, farmyard, garden centre, farm shop and a restaurant.

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    The Rutland Arms Hotel

    by stevezero Updated Jan 31, 2005

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    The Rutland Arms Hotel, Bakewell

    The Rutland Arms Hotel is the historical home of the Bakewell Pudding. It was here in the 19thC that a kitchen maid missunderstood the instructions for a strawberry tart, put the egg mixture on top, and the town never looked back.

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    The Old Original Bakewell Pudding Shop

    by stevezero Written Jan 31, 2005

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    The Old Original Bakewell Pudding Shop

    Bakewell is famous for its tarts, or more correctly, pudding.
    The Old Original Bakewell Pudding Shop is set in a 17thC building, and still sells them made to the original recipe.
    They also sell all manner of other confections.

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    Parish Church Of All Saints

    by stevezero Updated Jan 31, 2005

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    Parish Church Of All Saints, Bakewell

    The Parish Church Of All Saints, with its octaconal tower and elegant spire dominates the landscape of the town. it attracts the eye from almost any direction in town.

    The church was founded in 920 and although parts are Norman, most of the modern building dates from the 13th century and it was virtually rebuilt in the 1840s. It contains many interesting monuments and is well worth a visit.

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    Walking around

    by Arm-Chair-Hero Updated Aug 1, 2003

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    Bridge Into Bakewell

    The bridge carrying the main road through Bakewell. A really nice area to have a short stroll, sit down, feed the ducks or just simply watch the fish in the river. When crossing the bridge care should be taken as the footpath is not very wide, you get some one coming in the opposite direction and one of you will have to turn sideways......please remember this if you have children.

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    All Saints' Parish Church

    by suvanki Written Sep 8, 2013

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    All Saints' Parish Church
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    I've been meaning to have a look around this historical church for a long time, and managed to have a quick peep during my recent visit. A lady was waiting to close the church, but let me have a few minutes to wander around.

    I bought an information leaflet for 20p - there is a more in depth book for £2.

    So, before entering the church (where there is a warning notice that there are six steps into the church), the South porch has some interesting features - Carved stones and ancient grave covers that are dated from pre-1066! The stones on the Right are thought to have come from the original Saxon church, while the grave covers on the left date from some time after the Norman conquests to the 1400's

    An informative display board points out the possible occupations of the deceased. A carved key might indicate a blacksmith, bailiff or constable, Shears- a Wool Merchant or Farmer, a Chalice? Maybe a Priest.

    The South Porch was added to the church in the 1400's. Dating back to Anglo Saxon times, the church has been re-built and renovated over the centuries. CLICK HERE FOR HISTORY OF THE CHURCH

    At the foot of the steps is an impressive covered font that dates back to the 14th Century, which Pevsner decreed was 'The Finest of its kind in the county'

    to be continued......

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    Monsal Dale

    by stevezero Written Jan 31, 2005

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    Monsal Dale, Derbyshire

    Monsal Dale is one of the most scenic dales, of the Peak District, Derbyshire.
    It is situated some 9 kms from Bakewell and offers some splendid walks.
    A main railway from London to Manchester ran along the valley until 1968. The viaduct which carried it over the River Wye still remains and is a listed monument. It now forms part of the Monsal Trail.

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    Monsal Head Viaduct

    by stevezero Written Jan 31, 2005

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    Monsal Head Viaduct

    The viaduct spans the gorge of the River Wye, just after the railway used to emerge from the 500m long Headstone Tunnel.
    Now much restored, the viaduct forms part of the Monsal Trail and offers wonderful views of the Monsal Dale for anyone walking accross it.

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    Tourist Information

    by Balam Written Sep 27, 2013

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    Old Market Hall
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    A good place to start is the Tourist Information, It is situated in the Old Market Hall which dates from the early 17th century, It is operated jointly by the Peak National Park Authority and Derbyshire Dales District Council, It has a lot of information on the area as well as a nice selection of souvenirs and gifts.
    There is a photography gallery located upstairs on the mezzanine floor

    Mon 1 Apr 2013 - Thu 31 Oct 2013 Mon - Sun 09:30 to 17:00

    Fri 1 Nov 2013 - Mon 31 Mar 2014 Mon - Sun 10:30 to 16:30

    follow on twitter @peakinfocentres

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    Bakewell Church

    by Balam Written Sep 30, 2013

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    Church Of All Saints
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    The Church Of All Saints is a fantastic building on a hill high above the old town of Bakewell, The Steeple was constructed in the 1840s and can be seen from miles around, Most of the churches early elements are Norman but the arch piercing wall between the nave and south isle is thought to be of Saxon origin.The west front dates from the 12c and its larges window helps to flood the building with light.

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    Old House Museum

    by Balam Updated Sep 30, 2013

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    The Old House Museum is a great place to visit, i'm really sorry that we did not have the time to go in but i will definitely call in next time i visit.

    Family Ticket £10 (2 Adults, up to 3 children 5-16yrs)
    Adults £3.50
    Children £2
    Children under 5 FREE
    NEW- Hill of History Guided Walk around Bakewell Town £4
    Private guided tours for groups by arrangement until begining of December
    Opening Times
    11.00am - 4.00pm Daily (Last visitor entrance 3.30pm) 29th March – 5th November 2013
    Email: bakewellmuseum@googlemail.com

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    Monsal Head

    by Balam Written Sep 30, 2013

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    Monsal Head
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    Monsal Head is a great place to stop on the way back towards Manchester from Bakewell, there is a fantastic view as well as a pub bar an a cafe. we stopped on the way back after passing it on the way there and seeing how good it looked,
    The views are great, it was once a stop for the train and pack horses would bring people up to the pub which was then called the Railway Arms.sadly that station is no longer there and the pub and Stables Bar exists because of people passing by.

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