Eyam Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by Benson35
  • Things to Do
    by Benson35
  • Things to Do
    by Benson35

Most Recent Things to Do in Eyam

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    Eyam Hall

    by Benson35 Written Apr 2, 2013

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    Eyam Hall was lived in by the Wright family for over 300 years. In 1992 this beautiful home was opened to the public.
    You have to purchase a ticket to gain entrance to the house and gardens. The prices as of writing this (April 2013) are:
    £7.50 Adults
    £6.50 Concessions
    £4 Children
    £20 Family ticket (2 adults and up to 4 children)
    Eyam Hall is not open all year round, check the webpage for opening details.

    Whilst exploring Eyam Hall, you will find a tapestry room, paintings of the members of the Wright family, a nursery and an examples of clothes worn by the family over the centuries.
    The gardens are lovely, especially in the summer where everything is in bloom.

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    Eyam Museum

    by Benson35 Written Apr 1, 2013

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    Eyam museum costs £2.50 for adults and £2 for children and OAP's to gain entrance. A family ticket for 2 adults and 2 children is also available for £7.50.

    This museum is very interesting and I learnt so much about the plague that devistated Eyam in 1665/6.
    The museum starts explaining how the plague came to England (London) via the fleas that lived on rats which came off the ships from Asia and India and alike. As you read the information boards, you discover how the plague was treated, what the Doctors wore (for 'protection'), the death rates, how these were recorded and how Eyam picked itself back up once the plague had gone from this village.

    Some of the symptoms of the plague were:
    - An unquenchable thirst
    - Weakness
    - A fever, headaches, fainting and coma
    - Frothing black or green boils
    - Swelling of internal organs

    The museum has a gift shop and is run solely by volunteers. It is not open on Mondays (apart from Bank Holidays).

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    Exploring the village of Eyam

    by Benson35 Written Apr 1, 2013

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    Walking around the village is exciting as to what you are going to find next. There are information boards about the unique events that have happened over the centuries in Eyam. Find 'The stocks', 'Plague Cottage' and the Saxon Celtic cross in the church yard. There are a few shops dotted around the village such as a butchers, post office, general store and cafe.
    There is a notice board near Eyam Hall that informs you what is 'going on'.
    There are also vintage shops and a studio where children and adults alike can paint pottery.

    http://www.eyamplaguevillage.co.uk/index.php/find-eyam
    This website will give you directions on how to get to Eyam

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    The Church Yard

    by Benson35 Written Apr 1, 2013

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    Eyam holds a beautiful church and church yard. The church is open to visitors and you are free to walk around the graveyard.
    You will find the grave of one of the plague victims and also a lovely Saxon cross that was originally placed on the other side of the village but moved to the church yard.

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    St Lawrences Parish Church - Sundial

    by suvanki Written Mar 19, 2011

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    St Lawrence Parish Church - sundial

    Over the Priests door, which leads to the South aisle, is this impressive sundial, which is considered to be the most elaborate of its kind in Derbyshire (if not further afield)!

    It is thought to be the design of a Mr Duffin, and was created by local stone mason, William Shaw, who created it in 1775. Alternative thought is that the dial was designed and made by John Whitehurst, a master clock and instrument maker from Derby.



    Time is shown in half hours. Months and signs of the zodiac, along with longitude degrees AND...local times of cities around the world!
    Two of the latin mottoes translate as "Take to thyself a wise mind" or "Cultivate an enquiring mind" and "Like a shadow, so passes life"

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    St Lawrences Parish Church - Celtic Cross

    by suvanki Written Mar 19, 2011

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    Celtic Cross
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    In the church yard is a stone Celtic cross, believed to date back to the 8th Century. It was probably used as a wayside Preaching cross.

    With its carvings of Christian and pagan symbols, it is considered to be one of the finest examples in the country. This is dated from the time that Christian beliefs were beginning to take over from pagan practices such as worshiping the sun etc.
    I particularly liked the Celtic patterns on the side of the cross and the 'angelic monkeys' on the cross (well that's what they looked like to me)!

    I'm sure that I read somewhere that it was found in a field and then later transferred to the church yard

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    St Lawrences - Eyam Parish Church

    by suvanki Updated Mar 19, 2011
    St Lawrences - Eyam Parish Church
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    The Church dedicated to St Lawrence, is believed to have Saxon foundations, with Norman pillars and a Norman window in the west side.
    The church was closed when I visited, but there was still plenty of interest to see.

    The tower was added in the 17th Century, at this time it housed 4 bells, with the oldest dating to 1628. 2 more were added to the belfrey later.

    There is evidence that religion has been practiced in Eyam for over a thousand years, with records also dating the first rector commencing his ministry here in 1258

    The church was closed during the Plague of 1665-6, to prevent further spread of disease. Services were held outside, in a valley known as Cucklett Delf. An annual service is held here to commemorate this period in Eyams history.

    I'm hoping to visit when the church is open. In particular I'm interested in seeing the small exhibition, which includes the Parish registers from the time of the plague, and a Victorian window by Christopher Webb, which contains his 'signature' of a spiders web.

    Looking at the church web site it states that annually St Lawrence's receives 100,000 visitors. These include 600 school parties, and that at times there can be around 400 school children looking around the village! - Note to self, to visit during school holidays, and early morning/late afternoon!!

    Daily Opening Times

    WINTER - (October to Easter) 09.00 - 16.00
    Closed in adverse weather.


    SUMMER - (Easter to the end of September) 09.00 -18.00 (Usually Stewards are on duty)


    EVENINGS - Only by special arrangement. Please contact the Parish Administrator for details.

    Post cards and leaflets available to purchase, or send a cheque (see web site)

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    Eyam Tea Shop

    by suvanki Updated Mar 19, 2011

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    Eyam Tea Shop
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    The Tea shop at Eyam looked quite pleasant, but sadly it was closed at the time of my visit.

    This is another plague site.

    The Green plaques states that this was the house of John Torres, who died during the plague on 29th July 1666, followed by his 8 month old son Godfrey 5 days later. Joan, Johns wife survived.

    While the adjacent bakers shop with the bull ring, is a reminder of deliberate cruelty to animals, outside the tea shop is something that shows how animals today are generally treated with more respect - a water tap and drinking bowl for visiting dogs. (pic 3)

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    Water Lane Troughs

    by suvanki Written Mar 19, 2011

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    Water Lane Troughs
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    Eyam was quite a forward thinking place, and was possibly the first village in England to construct a public water supply. Colonel Francis Bradshaw had this brain wave in 1588.

    Water from the natural springs was diverted to a circuit of pipes, which connected with over a dozen stone troughs, situated throughout the village.

    The spring water was suitable for drinking, and was gathered from the spout leading into a trough. You can see the spout in my photo. The water gathered in the troughs was used to water cattle and horses, or as here, for laundry purposes. The spring water would be quite soft. Clothing and bedding etc was then laid out on the common land to dry. Hmm, I'm guessing this would have to be well planned, as Derbyshire is quite prone to inclement weather!

    As Eyam is sited on Sandstone/ gritstone, it doesn't have a well system to capture water.
    Well Dressing is a tradition in Derbyshire, and in Eyam, three of the troughs are symbolically decorated and displayed during the last weekend of August. I'll cover this in Local Customs.

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    The Bull Ring

    by suvanki Written Mar 19, 2011

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    The Bull Ring

    Passing by the Bakers shop, I spotted another 'green sign' on the wall above a lump of stone.

    This was the site of the Bull Ring - a metal ring to tether the unfortunate chained creature to (and not an arena for bull fighting) when dogs were set onto the helpless beast. Apparently this was in the belief that it tenderised the meat! Obviously, this practice has long been abolished. (in 1835 the practice of animal baiting was made illegal)

    However, in the Derbyshire town of Chesterfield, a bye-law ruled that every butcher had to bait a bull before slaughter or risk a fine of 3s.4d. (Three shillings and four pennies)

    The bull was angered, causing it to struggle, and in turn aggravated the dogs, who 'fought harder' This was sometimes done by an irritant such as pepper being blown into his snout. The dogs were trained to bite onto the sensitive snout, which held the bull down.

    Apparently, the bull ring was re-discovered, under the road in The Square, and re-positioned here.

    Most villages around Derbyshire would have a similar tethering spot, although there are only thought to be 4 surviving - this being one of them.

    Bull baiting was a popular at Carnivals, Markets and weddings etc! Bulls weren't the only creatures tortured in the name of entertainment - Bears and badgers were baited, while cockerel and dog fighting were popular.

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    The Miners Arms

    by suvanki Updated Mar 19, 2011

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    The Miners Arms, Eyam
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    The Miners Arms, is the only remaining pub in Eyam. Despite its relatively small size, at one time there would have been nearly a dozen hostelries, where the local farmers and miners could enjoy a respite from their hard lives for a while.


    Built in 1630 (nearly four decades before the plague would reach Eyam), the pub was housed in a row of miners cottages - presumably, being expanded and renovated over the centuries. (Pic 4) shows a row of nearby cottages that might have been of a similar age and design

    One of the many hurriedly created burial grounds was at the side of the pub.

    Until 1764, the inn was known as the Kings Head. It was then re-named the Miners Arms

    Lead mining, agriculture, silk weaving and shoe making were the main industries of the village .

    The mine managers etc, used to meet up here, under the name of the Barnate Court. Here they settled disputes arising in the lead mines such as land rights. Miscreants being made to spend time in the Village stocks.

    In 1777, prosperity came to the village, with the discovery of the Hucklow Side Vein . A mining boom ensued for the next century.

    The Miners arms served as a meeting place (from 1812) for the interestingly named 'Prosecution of Felons committee' Apparently the committee is still in existance

    Well as an old pub, you can imagine that it's not just the spirits behind the bar that are in evidence.............. This is reported to be the most haunted buildings in Derbyshire. Two sisters burnt to death in a fire on the original site of this pub, and the landlady murdered by her husband are among the most regular sightings/hearings.
    This is a popular site for 'Ghost -spotters' and groups with an interest in the paranormal etc.
    Well I'm afraid that I found the pub had a warm and friendly atmosphere, with nothing at all sinister or creepy!
    Near the entrance is a green plaque (one of many to be found around Eyam, denoting points of interest) This mentions a 'wedding' that took place in this establishment, between the Reverend Joseph Hunt, and the Landlords daughter, who was named Ann Fearns or Furness) (pic 2)

    Read about this, and more of Eyams ghostly sightings

    As well as serving great bar food and draught beers (I'll cover the Restaurant in my Restaurants tips), the Miners Arms is a Bed & Breakfast, so you can stay in this 'haunted pub'

    The pub retains many of its original features, and has some interesting memorabilia/ old prints and a framed piece about the plague and the nursery rhyme that it is believed to have inspired. (pic 3)

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    Eyam Parish Church

    by Gillybob Written Jul 28, 2010

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    St Lawrence Church
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    The Parish Church of St Lawrence is a great historical church. It was from here that co-ordinated efforts were made and the village cut themselves off from the surrounding villages when the plague entered the village in September 1665; this saved thousands of lives of those living in the area.

    Christian worship has taken place in Eyam for over 1000 years with the first recorded Rector beginning his ministry in 1250 whilst the Church itself dates from Saxon times.

    The church also has a magnificent wall sundial.

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    Plague Cottages

    by Gillybob Written Jul 28, 2010

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    Plague Cottages

    Eyam's history is of a village which took courageous action during the plague which started in 1665.

    In the village, you will find a row of cottages where the plague first broke out within the village as a result of a bundle of cloth being sent from London to a tailor who was temporarily residing in one of the cottages.

    In one cottage lived the Hadfield family - mother Mary, her two sons (Edward and Jonathan), her husband Alexander as well as an employed hand, George Vicars.

    Within a period of 11 months in 1665/6, all but Mary had been killed by the plague. Mary lost a total of 13 relatives in the plague.

    The cottages are all now privately owned.

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  • The poignant Riley Graves

    by cwningen Written Mar 11, 2010

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    The Riley graves
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    Just outside Eyam are the Riley graves, the burial place of the Hancock family. The mother survived but lost her husband and six children in the space of a week. She had to bury them herself. The National Trust looks after the site now - I believe it's their smallest 'property'.

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    Chatsworth House & Garden

    by gypsysoul73 Written Oct 16, 2007

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    Chatsworth House
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    Chatsworth House is the seat of the Dukes of Devonshire, whose family name is Cavendish.The house contains a unique collection of priceless paintings, furniture, Old Master drawings, neoclassical sculpture and other artefacts. Chatsworth's garden is one of the most famous in England. Chatsworth has been selected as the United Kingdom's favourite country house several times.

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