Derbyshire Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by bonio
  • Old Market Hall
    Old Market Hall
    by Balam
  • Church Of All Saints
    Church Of All Saints
    by Balam

Derbyshire Things to Do

  • Chatsworth

    If you enjoy touring grand houses, don't miss Chatsworth. It's the ancestral home of the Dukes of Devonshire and though the current Duke and Duchess still live here, the house belongs to a trust now. The huge estate is still a working estate and the house and gardens are open to the public. There are farm shops that sell seeds and other items and...

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  • THE PEAK DISTRICT

    The peak district lies mainly in Derbyshire although some parts of it lie in Cheshire, Greater Manchester, Staffordshire, South and West Yorkshire.The highest point is Kinder Scout which is 2.087 feet high. It is the 5th largest national park in England and Wales.Along with tourism, mining and quarrying are major employers in the Peak District.

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  • Climb up to Mam Tor

    Separating the villages of Edale and Castleton there is a high ridge of hills that culminates in the peak called Mam Tor. It was the site of an ancient Hillfort; I think Saxon in age but I am open to be corrected. There are some small plaques set into the steps that show the likely design of the housing structures but frankly you just have to use...

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  • Ride or walk the Monsal Trail

    Since late May 2011 the full 20km length of the Monsal trail that follows much of the river Wye in it's various names from near Bakewell to Blackwell Mill has been accessible to cyclists, walkers and even horse riders. Apparently over £2m has been spent on reviving the tunnels and making them safe so it's no longer necessary to detour around them....

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  • A day out at the Chatsworth Estate

    We were lucky with the weather which made exploring the grounds even more pleasurable. Starting off admiring the greenhouses we moved onto the walled kitchen garden with it's tidy rows of vegetables interspersed with flowers for cutting. There are some splendid displays of how to train fruit trees to grow over pergolas and trellises so it's a...

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  • Chatsworth: The Palace of the Peak

    Located near the Peak District, Chatsworth is one of England's most beautiful country manor homes, a real treasure. The estate has been home to the Cavendish family since 1549, and the house was completed in 1557. Also, photography is allowed not only outside in the gardens, but even inside the home itself--very unusual for stately homes such as...

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  • Heights of Abraham, Matlock Bath.

    There is a cable car up to the Heights, starting from just upstream of the railway station.The Heights of Abraham is a tourist centre placed high above Matlock Bath and opposite High Tor. It rises 450 feet above Matlock Bath and the views of the surrounding area are beautiful. There are various attractions including two show caves and hands on...

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  • Eyam, the Plague Village

    The village of Eyam is called the Plague Village. In 1665, during an outbreak of bubonic plague, the disease spread to this village, probably in the fleas that were with a shipment of cloth. People started dying quickly but the parson realized what was going on and he organized the villagers. They isolated themselves, quarantined themselves and to...

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  • Ashbourne

    Ashbourne is a classic small English market town, sitting at the edge of the Peak District and a good base for explorations.With only 7,500 inhabitants is really is very small........but there has been a settlement there since at least Saxon times. It retains its Medieval street pattern, although the vast majority of building are Georgian,...

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  • Ashbourne

    Ashbourne is a classic small English market town, sitting at the edge of the Peak District and a good base for explorations.With only 7,500 inhabitants is really is very small........but there has been a settlement there since at least Saxon times. It retains its Medieval street pattern, although the vast majority of building are Georgian,...

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  • The Peak District.

    The Peak District is one of England's National Parks. It has been so since 1951, when its special character was recognised and preserved for our pleasure.A place of bleak moorland and deep valleys, of old rocks and prehistory, of caves and potholes, little villages and rushing streams, winding roads and stunning views.There are trackways and...

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  • Chatsworth House

    Country home of the Dukes of Devonshire (even though Devon is hundreds of miles away) Chatsworth is a lovely example of an English 'stately home'.Set in rolling countryside, its opulent interior is partially open to the public (the house is still privately owned): painted ceilings, luxurious rooms, paintings and scultpures and ornamental furniture,...

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  • Visit Calke Abbey

    There are many great 'country houses 'in England, but Calke ('cork') Abbey is a bit different.Calke Abbey was owned by the Harpur family from 1622. Some of them were somewhat eccentric, and many of them were enthusiastic collectors of everything and anything; fossils, shells, butterflies, stuffed creatures,china, paintings.....The family had to...

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  • The Crooked Spire, Chesterfield

    I've seen this landmark many times when visiting this Derbyshire town, and from the train or coach when travelling past. This shot was from a National Express bus when I was travelling from London Victoria to Sheffield after my Iran trip.The church of Saint Mary and All Saints is the site of the 14th century tower/Spire, that can be seen for miles...

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  • Peak Railway- travel back in time!

    The Peak Railway was originally part of the Midland Railway line between Manchester Central and London St Pancras, but in 1968, the line between Matlock and Buxton was closed and lifted. In 1975, a group of rail enthusiasts formed the Peak Railway Society, aiming to re-open this line. In 1991, a service opened between Matlock and Darley Dale, and...

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  • Grindleford

    This is part of an answer to a Forum question Grindleford is a nice place to stay - I used to go there a lot Pubs - Sir William (pub, restaurant and rooms) and Maynard Arms-(Restaurant and Hotel as well as bar)Grindleford Station cafe is a legend!Trains to Sheffield 7 miles away and Manchester.Buses pass through too.Nearby villages of Eyam (The...

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  • Litton

    Litton is an attractive village, situated 1000 ft above sea level, and 4m NW of Bakewell.17th and 18th Century stone cottages surround the village green- where there are a set of stocks and an ancient cross as well as picnic tables. The Village pub- The Red Lion is a traditional 17th century pub, offering a selection of Real Ales, Home Cooking and...

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  • Bakewell - Home of The Pudding!

    Bakewell is a pretty market town, which developed along the banks of the River Wye. The 13th century 5 arched bridge is one of Bakewells attractions. A short walk from the bridge is the Agricultural Business centre, where weekly livestock auctions are held. Mondays are quite lively, with the influx of farmers, Market Traders and visitors. Cattle...

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  • Castleton

    Castleton is one of Derbyshires prettiest villages, sitting at the head of The Vale of Hope,(Hope is its' next-door neighbour) and is surrounded on three sides by steep hill ridges - to the NW is the imposing Mam Tor or 'Shivering Mountain'. Above another ridge is Peveril Castle, (Which was a present From William The Conquorer to his son William...

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  • Beeley - Conservation Village

    Beeley is situated at the edge of the Chatsworth Estate, in Derbyshire and The Peak National Park. The 19th century gritstone houses, with their cottage gardens, are quite attractive. There are strict rules regarding the decoration and alteration of these properties. I understand that their inhabitants are mainly workers on the Chatsworth Estate,...

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  • Youlgrave / Youlgreave

    Attractive village, nestling in the Bradford Valley. Popular place for Walkers. The River Bradford flows through the edge of the village, joining The River Lathkill at nearby Alport.Lathkill Dale, being a place for many walks. Church Street, in the centre of the village has some attractive old stone houses and shops. A few years ago I visited here...

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  • Walking rock climbing fantastic

    This is one of my all time best places. My dog loves it I love it Hubby loves it. We try to go hiking around Derbyshire 2/3 times a month. This helped to give up smoking. Every walk ends at a pub, there is not one in Derbyshire my dog's unknown in. Peace and the most wonderful scenery

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  • Elvaston Castle, St Bartholomew's Church

    The parish church of St Bartholomew stands in the grounds of Elvaston Castle and is close to the mansion. The oldest part of the church is the chancel, which dates back to around 1200, though it was restored and lengthened by Bodley in 1905. Almost everything else is medieval, including the fine Perpendicular west tower. The clerestory and north...

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  • Elvaston Castle Gardens

    The gardens in front of the castle are layed out formally, with box hedges and topiary. Again who knows haw much longer the public will be allowed to access them?

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  • Elvaston Castle Country Park

    Elvaston Castle Country Park has over 200 acres of woodland, parkland and fascinating formal gardens to explore. At the heart of the park is the castle building, which despite its name, is really a country house. Today, due to its need for restoration, the castle is only occassionally open to the public. There are plans to lease the castle to a...

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  • Repton School

    Founded in 1557, Repton has a history of distinguished alumni in public life, sport and the arts, including Roald Dahl, C B Fry, Graeme Garden and Jeremy Clarkson. It incorporates the ruins of an 11th century monastery.The 21st Century Repton is a fully co-educational school with a strong boarding ethos and is home to 600 pupils. We were amazed by...

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  • St Wystan's Church, Repton - Crypt

    Of note in the church at repton is the fine Anglo Saxon crypt dating back from the 7th century, which lies buried deep in the bowels of the building.Many visitors are puzzled as to where the bodies lay. The Anglo-Saxons probably were quite short, but not as short as the recesses which housed them. The explanation is that the mausoleum held not the...

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  • St Wystan's Church, Repton

    Recently travelling in South derbyshire with an hour to kill, we decided to stop at repton, a place I was not familiar with. Glad we did too, as there was quite a bit to see for a small village.Repton is in fact the cradle of christianity in the midlands area, and the church spire dominates the local landscape. Christians have worshipped here since...

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  • 105 acre gardens

    Definatley try walking around the wooded area, the height gives a great view and there's not just woodland - there's waterfalls and out onto open moorland at the top of the hill.

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  • Sudbury - All Saints Church

    The Doomsday Book of 1086 records that there was a church at Sudbury. This was most likely a wooden building, very possibly on the same site as the present building, and could have been of Saxon foundation. This building was thought to have been replaced by a stone building in Norman times. There are traces of Norman style work in the South doorway...

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  • Sudbury Hall - Museum of Childhood

    Situated in the 19th century service wing of Sudbury Hall, the National Trust Museum of Childhood contains fascinating displays about children from the 18th century onwards.Many of the displays are interactive and you can play with many of the toys and sit in the old scholroom.For the child in all of us!National trustAdmission Charge - Adults...

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  • Sudbury Hall

    Built during the reign of Charles II, Sudbury is an unusual Hall located in South Derbyshire. It is an important edifice, and the most richly decorated of its time among English Country Houses. In 1660, George Vernon decided to rebuild the old manor house and, as its squire for 42 years, did so without the help of an architect. Thus, the structure...

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  • Stainsby Mill

    Stainsby Mill is a19th-century water mill in full working order in an idyllic rustic setting on the Hardwick estate. It has a massive 17 foot waterwheel which drives the millstones and other machineryYou can watch the grinding millstones, then buy the freshly produced flour.In the care of the National trustAdmission Charge - Adults £2.60

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  • Hardwick Hall Gardens

    Hardwick Hall has a fine collection of gardens which have evolved over the centuries with the house. There are fine formal gardens along with a parkland setting, with fine views over the surrounding countryside.

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  • Hardwick Old Hall

    Hardwick Old Hall is the remodelled family home of Bess of Hardwick, one of the richest and most remarkable women of Elizabethan England. it stands beside the New Hall she had built later in the 1597. Though the Old Hall is now roofless, visitors can still ascend four floors to view surviving decorative plasterwork, as well as the kitchen and...

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  • Hardwick Hall

    Hardwick Hall is one of Britain's greatest and most complete Elizabethan houses. The hall was compelted in 1597, on a site a mere stone's throw from the site of an older hallIt was built for 'Bess of Hardwick', Elizabethan England's second most powerful and wealthy woman It is known throughout the world for its outstanding 16th and 17th-century...

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  • Sutton Scarsdale Hall

    This is the imposing shell of a grandiose Georgian mansion built in 1724, with an immensely columned exterior. Roofless since c. 1920, when its interiors were dismantled and some exported to America: but there is still much to discover within, including traces of sumptuous plaster-work. Set amid contemporary garden remains.There are good views from...

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  • Bolsover Castle

    Bolsover Castle as a dominating position on a hill overlooking a valley. The present castle occupies the site of a medieval castle built by the Peverel family shortly after the Norman Conquest. Sir Charles Cavendish bought the old castle in 1612 and began work on his 'Little Castle' project. The castle was however built more for comfort than...

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  • Bolsover Castle

    This stately 17th century house was built during a period when medieval castles were becoming outmoded. This was due to two factors. First was greater social stability, along with a more prosperous economy. Second was the development of cannons, which could knock down castle walls. So a "castle" became a country manor home. This one retained...

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  • Blue John Mine - unique experience

    One of my fondest memories of the Derbyshire Peak District is the Blue John Cavern at Castleton. This is a network of massive caves deep under the hillside. Blue John, a precious stone unique to Derbyshire, has been mined there for centuries.The steep, twisting route takes you deep underground and the tour takes an hour. Great fun, watch your...

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  • Crich Memorial Tower

    The tower was built in 1923 to commemorate the 11 409 men form the Sherwood Forestors regiment who lost their lives in the first world war 1914 - 1918.It was further dedicated to include the vitcims of the second world war.The tower is 29m high and some 191m above sea level. You can climb the stairs to the top of the tower to gain a marvelous view...

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  • Crich Tramway Village

    Crich Tramway Village, formally Crich Tramway Museum, holds the national collection of trams. Exhibits include horse drawn trams, steam trams and electric trams. Most are from the British Isles, with a sprinkling of foreign vehicles.Admission entitles you to free tram rides along the museums tracks along a former quarry, with stunning views over...

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  • Old Dolphin Inn, Derby

    The Old Dolphin Inn, Derby, calims to be built on a foundation dating to 1530, The timber framed building itself having been known to date from 1618.The exterior timber was replaced in 1912, but the interior is relatively unspoilt

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  • Derby Library

    Derby Library was built in 1879, designed by RK Freeman. It was a gift to the city by Michael Thomas Bass, local brewer, and long time derby M.P.It now also houses artworks.

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  • Derby Riverside Gardens

    Derby Riverside Gardens are a short walk from the city centre, but provide a quiet escape from the bustle of city life.They were originally created around the 1930's.

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Derbyshire Hotels

See all 131 Hotels in Derbyshire
  • Jurys Inn Derby

    The Jury's Inn opened in June, 2009. It's bright and clean and the rooms have coffee makers, flat...

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  • East Lodge Country House Hotel

    Matlock Rd, Rowsley, Matlock, DE4 2EF, United King

    Satisfaction: Excellent

    Good for: Business

  • Crewe and Harpur Arms

    Market Square, Longnor, Buxton, SK17 0NS, United Kingdom

    Satisfaction: Excellent

    Good for: Business

Top Derbyshire Hotels

Buxton Hotels
84 Reviews - 189 Photos
Bakewell Hotels
77 Reviews - 228 Photos
Ashbourne Hotels
13 Reviews - 33 Photos
Derby Hotels
103 Reviews - 197 Photos
Chesterfield Hotels
48 Reviews - 139 Photos
Glossop Hotels
3 Reviews - 19 Photos
Swadlincote Hotels
1 Hotel
Peak District National Park Hotels
160 Reviews - 222 Photos
Matlock Hotels
48 Reviews - 311 Photos
Edensor Hotels
28 Reviews - 30 Photos
Castleton Hotels
20 Reviews - 38 Photos

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Derbyshire Things to Do

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