Youlgreave Travel Guide

  • Conduit or Fountain Head
    Conduit or Fountain Head
    by suvanki
  • Tomb of Thomas Cockayne
    Tomb of Thomas Cockayne
    by suvanki
  • All Saints Parish Church
    All Saints Parish Church
    by suvanki

Youlgreave Things to Do

  • suvanki's Profile Photo

    by suvanki Written Dec 14, 2012

    In the North Aisle is this Jacobean Wall Memorial, dedicated to a knight - Roger Rooe of Alport. He died on 30th April 1613. His family lived at Monks Hall, Alport at the beginning of the 17th Century.
    The alabaster plaque shows Rooe and his wife kneeling in profile, separated by a prayer desk. Below is a line of eight figures - their children!. Mrs Rooe is seen wearing a ruff and tall hat.
    Their eldest son John Rooe left this sleepy Derbyshire village for Greys Inn, London for a career in Law , while the widow remarried sometime after 1615 - a Nicholas Foxley, who had no children
    Their family crest features in the memorial

    Jacobean Wall Memorial
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    • Religious Travel
    • Budget Travel

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  • suvanki's Profile Photo

    by suvanki Written Dec 14, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In the centre of the chancel is the alabaster tomb of Thomas Cockayne, a member of a local influential family whose father John Cockayne was a Yorkist supporter during the 'War of the Roses' between Yorkists and Lancastrians.

    Cockayne junior met his death in 1488 following a fight over a marriage settlement, with Thomas Burdett.
    Cockayne was married to Agnes Barlow, whose brother Robert Barlow, has an alabaster tomb in Barlow church.

    The effigy is quite small (3'6") , the reason being his father was still living ,
    Thomas was an adult with children of his own.

    The carved figure is depicted wearing plate armour with a gorget and skirt of chain mail (with some traces of gilding) and a Yorkist collar with suns and roses. a sheathed dagger is worn on his right. His head rests on his helmet, which features a cockerel - a 'jokey pun' on the family name. His feet rest on a lion
    The plinth contains heraldic shields with family crests, supported by angels.

    The tomb has some damage - it was found in a barn in 1870, and restored by some of his ancestors in 1873. Drawings show that the tomb was located by the chancel door in the 19th Century

    Within the sanctuary of the chancel is another tomb that dates back to the 14th Century- of a Crusador that is understood to be Sir John Rossington. He rests his feet on a dog and is holding a heart

    Tomb of Thomas Cockayne Tomb of Thomas Cockayne Tomb of Thomas Cockayne and chancel
    Related to:
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    • Historical Travel

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  • suvanki's Profile Photo

    by suvanki Written Dec 14, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Grade 1 listed Parish Church of All Saints is the second largest Medieval church in the Peak District (Tideswell pipping it to runner up) and one of the oldest. Its earliest recording is around 1150, when it wasgiven to St Marys Abbey in Leicester, although there was most likely to have been a church here in Saxon times.

    During Medieval times and unto the 19th Century, the Parish of Youlgreave extended to Middleton, Smerrill, Birchover,Stanton, Gratton, Alport, Conksbury, Winster and Elton.
    The parishioners of these original hamlets would travel to worship at this Church. As the villages grew in population, local chapels were built for worship, Although 'Hatch, Match and Dispatch' services (Baptisms,Weddings and Burials) were conducted at the Parish Church.

    There is plenty of interest in this church - The church guide (£2) is full of usefull information and a Glossary.
    Next time I visit here, I'll bring a torch and binoculars - parts are quite dimly lit, so I missed some of the features, and the ceiling is quite high in parts. (The roof bosses have heraldic coats of arms and 'fantastical' creatures including a bat devil figure with buttoned tunic and a half figure holding a shield)

    The oldest parts of this building (circa 1150 and 1170) are in the nave, with a late Norman arcade of three bays separating the nave from the South Aisle. The northern arcade was built later, but still in the 12th century. The font near the main door is Norman
    The church appears to have been expanded during the late 12th century, then subsequent restorations and expansions are reflected in the various styles and materials according to the prosperity (or lack of) at the time.

    Much of the work carried out in the 15th Century, including the construction of the chancel, the Perpendicular tower and timbered roof remains today.

    During Victorian times, the interior chancel was altered. Norman Shaw being responsible for this project, which included raising the roof. The window of the East side is quite special - designed by Edward Burne-Jones and made in the workshops of William Morris in 1876

    There are some interesting tombs and carvings to be spotted too.
    In the medieval porchway is a large slate slab (pic 5), into which is engraved The Ten Commandments - a reminder to those entering and leaving the church.

    Outside, the small bell-cote, which once held the Sanctus bell can be seen. This was rung each Shrove Tuesday. There are some interesting grave stones, including that of John Walker- "A man of clear and intelligent understanding who fulfilled the office of schoolmaster for upwards of 50 years with great credit to himself and general satisgfaction to the neighbourhood He paid the debt of Nature 14 April 1807 aged 82 years" (pic 4)

    Parking on the road outside.

    All Saints Parish Church All Saints Church tower All Saints Parish Church All Saints Parish Church
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel

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Youlgreave Restaurants

  • suvanki's Profile Photo

    by suvanki Written Dec 14, 2012

    Well it must be at least 5 years since I visited Youlgreave and this 17th Century pub, and I'm afraid that at our recent visit we didn't venture into this watering hole, or the nearby Farmyard Inn, or the Bulls Head (Which has closed down) BUT....... reading the reviews of food - locally sourced meat, game, fish etc served in a variety of pies and other dishes, I've put this place on my list of 'pubs to visit and try the food' - but think I'll nominate myself for navigation rather than driving duties as I seem to remember that they serve Theakstons Ales.

    I was driving last time I visited, so seem to remember having a soft drink and a sandwich.
    OK, I'll have to return in the name of VT research!

    Dogs and Children allowed
    Car Parking behind pub
    En Suite accommodation

    The George Hotel
    Related to:
    • Beer Tasting
    • Food and Dining
    • Wine Tasting

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  • colin_bramso's Profile Photo

    by colin_bramso Updated Sep 14, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A typical English village pub with friendly people, a good atmosphere, a main lounge bar, two smaller bar rooms and a few outside tables.

    The food is superb, from a very large & varied menu including home-made pies, venison, fish, steaks, soups, salads, sandwiches...and the vegetables are local, freshly harvested and delicious.

    There's a big range of beers, including the famous Theakston's Old Peculier, wine by the glass, coffee...

    Favorite Dish: Steak & Ale Pie and lamb chops. On our last visit the 'pie of the month' was a mouthwatering Game Pie, packed with venison, duck & rabbit with cranberries and sage. And the delicious desserts such as steamed syrup pudding with custard...in fact, we've never had anything that was less than excellent!

    The George, Youlgreave Part of the extensive menu The Lounge Bar Game Pie Lamb Chops The George, Youlgreave Part of the extensive menu Lounge Bar Game Pie Lamb Chops

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Youlgreave Nightlife

  • colin_bramso's Profile Photo

    by colin_bramso Updated Sep 2, 2006

    Youlgreave is a typical farming village so the only nightlife centres around the pubs. All over Britain pubs have been the real social centres of any village for hundreds of years, where the locals meet to relax, talk about their day, about local events, solving the world's problems! But it's all very relaxing, great fun and a great way to involve yourself in the local life and to meet the people.

    The food served at The George is worth travelling a long way for. Details under 'Restaurant Tips'.

    Dress Code: Casual.

    George Hotel, Youlgreave

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