Cockington Travel Guide

  • Cockington
    by EasyMalc
  • Cockington
    by EasyMalc
  • Things to Do
    by EasyMalc

Cockington Things to Do

  • A Walk around the Lakes

    This short walk from the village is suitable for families and wheelchairs and has only a steady incline, so shouldn’t be too difficult for people with mobility problems.Start at the Old Forge and walk down Cockington Lane past Rose Cottage Tea Gardens as though you’re heading towards the sea front.On the right hand side you’ll see Cockington’s only...

    more
  • The Arboretum

    The Arboretum is one of my favourite areas of Cockington.The trees are magnificent, there’s plenty of space, and no matter how many people are around, you can always find a quiet corner.From the Higher Lodge the Carriage Drive leads past the apple pound to ‘The Avenue’, which takes its name from the avenue of 42 Lime trees, planted here as recently...

    more
  • Cockington Court

    I think it would be fair to say that after arriving at the village the next place visitors aim for is Cockington Court.With Cockington’s history stretching back a thousand years and a dwelling here for most of that time, you could be forgiven for thinking that the Court would be a showcase of its rich history - but you’d be wrong.Cockington Court...

    more
  • Cockington Church

    Cockington’s Church, dedicated to St. George and St. Mary, has been here since the 11th cent.Initially it would have been a chapel for the Lords of the Manor but in 1203 the monks of Torre Abbey leased the chapel and its lands and kept them until 1539.The oldest part of this Grade I listed building is the tower which was built in the first half of...

    more
  • Visitor Centre

    In the centre of the village an arch with a thatched roof leads into the country park.Just inside the entrance up on the right hand side, is a hut which is, for the time being at least, the Visitor Centre. Between the entrance and the hut is an early 19th cent Grade II listed building known as the Linhay. This building is in urgent need of repair,...

    more
  • Cockington Village

    Many first time visitors to Cockington are confused when they arrive because at first sight there doesn’t seem to be an awful lot here. It’s only afterwards that they begin to realise that there’s more to Cockington than just the village.It has to be said though that the village centre is indeed very tiny with just a few gift shops and a couple of...

    more
  • Take A Walk In The Countryside

    Walking south or east from Cockington returns you to the urban sprawl of Torquay but taking any other direction leads you into the lush rolling rural landscapes of this part of South Devon. There are several circular walks within the immediate area and for walks further afield (so to speak) the relevant OS map is the Explorer 110 - Torquay and...

    more
  • And Finally, The Pub!!

    The village's pub, The Drum Inn, is one of the more recent buildings, having been constructed in 1936 after the aquisition of the estate by Torquay Council. The pub, and its extensive gardens, were designed by the renowned British architect Edwin Lutyens as part of the council's attempt to create a "model village".It is, architecturally, an...

    more
  • The Almshouses

    The original row of almshouses was built around 1620 by the then Lord of the Manor, Sir George Cary, for occupation by "Aged and Deserving residents of Cockington and Chelston". The present row of seven cottages were rebuilt by the Mallock family around 1840 and are now individually privately owned. These are an archetypal set of English almshouses...

    more
  • The Stableyard Craft Centre

    Whilst there's the hideously inconconguous modern Seachange Art and Craft Centre which is, to my mind, a total eyesore there's also the Stableyard Craft Centre which is much more in keeping with the rest of the estate.The 17th century stables have been converted into artisan workshops where visitors can watch demonstrations such as glass-blowing,...

    more
  • The Organic Kitchen Garden

    In the manor's heyday its kitchen garden would have made the house's kitchens pretty much self-sufficient for seasonal fruit and vegetables.The garden is now set up as a learning resource focusing on educating people about how to grow crops using purely organic techniques without the use of artificial fertilisers or pesticides. There is a full-time...

    more
  • The Rose Garden

    In the grounds of Cockington Court you'll find this walled rose garden. Of course this visit was in winter and so the blooms were a bit thin on the ground but I can imagine the heady scents and vibrant colours during the summer.The rose garden doubles as a memorial garden where you can pay for roses to be planted in memory of loved ones and the fee...

    more
  • Cockington Court

    Cockington as a village was pretty much privately owned from Norman times until it was taken over by Torquay Borough Council in 1932. During this period the estate was owned by just three families and the manor house, now known as Cockington Court, was developed and redeveloped during this period.The oldest obvious extant part of the building is...

    more
  • The Gamekeeper's Cottage

    One of the estate's most interesting buildings is the Gamekeeper's Cottage. This dates back to the 16th century and is conveniently located next to the former rabbit warren, which was a walled enclosure used to breed rabbits for fur and meat. The cottage is quite substantial but then only part of it would have been used as the gamekeeper's...

    more
  • The Old Mill

    An inventory from 1654, probably made in preparation for the sale of the estate by the Cary family to the Mallocks, lists the village as having four mills (along with 60 messuages, 10 tofts and a dovecote).The only remaining one however is much more recent and was a water-driven saw mill built sometime in the late 1800's - the millwheel was made by...

    more

Cockington Restaurants

  • Not as Olde Worlde as you might imagine

    Many South Devon villages have a thatched pub and Cockington has one too, but it might not be quite how you would have imagined it. Whereas most thatched village pubs are hundreds of years old The Drum was only built in 1936 and there’s a good reason for it. After Torbay Council bought the estate from the Mallocks in the 1930s, the famous...

    more
  • Devon Cream Teas

    If I was a politician I would have to declare an interest in the Weavers’ Cottage Tea Shoppe, not a financial one, but as an acquaintance of the owners.I always try to keep my reviews unbiased otherwise there’s no point in writing these tips in the first place.Paul and Karen who run the tea shop, welcomed me the first time I met them, and they do...

    more
  • Cockington Hotels

    0 Hotels in Cockington

Cockington Transportation

  • Ttavelling to Cockington by Bus

    Cockington is served by Local Link’s No 62 called the Cockington Tripper.The bus, which has its own special livery, operates in a circular route from Torquay Harbour to Cockington, around the town centre and back to the harbour.The service operates Monday to Saturday (excl Bank Holidays) from April to Sept and Monday to Friday from Oct to March.The...

    more
  • Travelling to Cockington by car

    If you’re driving into Cockington by car it’s worth knowing about the road layout and parking arrangements.There is some roadside parking but if you’re unfamiliar with the area it might be best to use one of the four designated car parks scattered around the village to prevent your day being spoilt by one of Torbay’s enthusiastic traffic wardens.If...

    more
  • The Local Link Minibus Service

    Cockington is only about a mile and a half from Torquay town centre but the walk is mostly through the urban sprawl and so the best option for getting between the two is the regular minibus service. I think this has changed slightly since I was last there, or maybe the "Local Link" has been rebranded to "Chelston Leisure Services", but the bus is...

    more

Cockington Shopping

  • EasyMalc's Profile Photo

    by EasyMalc Written Jun 3, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Not being one of the world’s greatest shoppers, I rarely write a tip about shopping but I’m going to make an exception for Cockington.
    Behind the Court are two very different shopping outlets - Sea Change, which is a modern, ecologically sustainable concept - and the Stableyard Craft Studios, which as its name suggests occupies the old stables of the Court.
    The thing I like about the Stableyard Craft Studios is that it’s possible to watch craftsmen and women at work in traditional surroundings.
    My particular favourites are the Glassblowing, Blacksmith, and Rocking Horse maker, which is particularly relevant given Cockington’s long association with horses.
    With only around seven studios you wouldn’t expect to spend much time here, but if you’re anything like me, watching the artisans at work may detain you somewhat longer than you had bargained for.

    Cockington Rocking Horses
    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

    more

Cockington Tourist Traps

  • johngayton's Profile Photo

    by johngayton Updated Sep 6, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Recently completed (2011) at a cost of about 3 million pounds is the Seachange Art and Craft Centre in the grounds of the manor house. This is "aimed at protecting and nurturing our heritage and culture for the residents of and visitors to the Bay attracting higher-spending consumers into the area, whilst also creating jobs for creative business people" (to quote the website).

    OK there are several interesting artisans now in residence, such as Paul Tout's handmade furniture workshop and Tony Fagan's chocolaterie but the buildings they are housed in are ludicrously incongruous when compared to the rest of the village and the other outbuildings within the estate.

    I suppose the trendily modern workspaces are at the cutting edge of environmental friendliness with their use of sustainable timber and energy efficient design but compared to the Stableyard, which is the estate's other Craft Centre housed in the 17th century stables, these new ones are a visual abomination.

    This initiative was implemented by the commercially-motivated Torbay Development Agency, as opposed to the more conservation-concerned Torbay Coast and Countryside Trust. The TDA's website makes all the right noises but the final result just doesn't work for me - http://www.torbaydevelopmentagency.co.uk/projects/torquay-projects/cockington-court-craft-centre

    So "TEAR THEM DOWN!!"

    Eyesore!!
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

    more

Cockington Sports & Outdoors

  • johngayton's Profile Photo

    by johngayton Written Apr 4, 2012

    Cockington's cricket club (The Corinthians) fields two XI's who play pretty much every summer weekend on the sloping pitch in front of the Court. This used to be part of the estate's deer enclosure but these days is a main thoroughfare and enjoyed by the visitors dogs.

    OK they don't play in any major leagues and the opposition is mostly local (tho' they do get as far as Bideford once a year) but what a beautiful setting for a game.

    Corinthians Cricket Ground Dogs Playground Too!
    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

    more

Instant Answers: Cockington

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

117 travelers online now

Comments

 
Explore Deeper into Cockington
Map of Cockington

View all Cockington hotels