Plymouth Favorites

  • Plymouth Visitor Information Centre
    Plymouth Visitor Information Centre
    by spidermiss
  • Plymouth Visitor Information Centre
    Plymouth Visitor Information Centre
    by spidermiss
  • Barbican TIC, Mayflower Centre
    Barbican TIC, Mayflower Centre
    by johngayton

Most Recent Favorites in Plymouth

  • SurfaceTravel's Profile Photo

    Plymouth Plaques: Bermuda

    by SurfaceTravel Written Sep 13, 2012

    Favorite thing: A plaque by the Mayflower Steps, Plymouth, UK

    "This tablet was erected in 1959 by the people of Bermuda to commemorate the 350th anniversary of the wreck on a Bermuda reef of "Sea Venture", Captain Christopher Newport, flagship of Admiral Sir George Somers, whose fleet sailed from Plymouth Sound on 2nd June, 1609, to carry settlers and supplies to the infant colony at Jamestown in Virginia. On board "Sea Venture" were 150 persons including Sir Thomas Gates, Governor Designate of Virginia, and all these were landed on the uninhabited island of Bermuda. In ten months they built two vessels and sailed on to Jamestown.

    "Sir George Somers, having returned to Bermuda for more supplies, died there on 9th November 1610. His heart was buried at St. George's, Bermuda, and his body at Whitchurch, Dorset. His name was given to the Bermudas or Somers Islands, now Britain's oldest colony.

    "Incerti quo fata ferunt ubi sistere detur contrahimusque viros. Virgil's Aeneid, Book III, line 7."

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  • SurfaceTravel's Profile Photo

    Plymouth Plaques: Newfoundland

    by SurfaceTravel Updated Sep 13, 2012

    Favorite thing: A plaque by the Mayflower Steps, Plymouth, UK

    "From plymouth Sound on June 11th 1583, Sir Humphrey Gilbert, "The Father of British colonisation", set sail for Newfoundland which he claimed for Queen Elizabeth I on 5th August.

    "This plaque was unveiled by the Honourable A. Brian Peckford, P.C., Premier of Newfoundland and Labrador on June 14th 1983 in the presence of Councillor Derek Mitchell, Lord Mayor of Plymouth, to commemorate the 400th anniversary of Gilbert's voyage."

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  • SurfaceTravel's Profile Photo

    Plymouth Plaques: Mayflower, Waldo Morgan Allen

    by SurfaceTravel Written Sep 13, 2012

    Favorite thing: A plaque by the Mayflower Steps, Plymouth, UK

    "The Barbican, Plymouth, Devon, England

    "The Mayflower sailed from here September 16 (new style), 1620, for Plymouth, New England. Part of her passengers were colonists from London, part were a seperatist congregation which had begun in Babworth, Nottinghamshire, on July 11, 1586, and had moved to Scrooby in 1606, to Amsterdam, Netherlands, in 1608, and to Leyden in 1609. The Leyden group had sailed on the Speedwell from Delft Haven August 1 (n.s.), 1620, for Southampton, Hampshire, England, to join the London group who were on the Mayflower. Both ships left Southampton on August 15 (n.s.), but leaks in the Speedwell forced a turning back to Dartmouth for repairs. Leaving Dartmouth, after proceeding about 300 miles, the leaky Speedwell caused a second return of both ships, this time to Plymouth. Here the Speedwell was abandoned, and the passengers of both ships combined on the mayflower - 102. Elder William Brewster was the spiritual leader of the seperatist pilgrims, and remained so in Plymouth, New England, until his death in 1643 - 44.

    "Stephen Hopkins of Wotton-under-Edge, Gloucestershire (later of St. Mary Matfellon, Whitechpel, London), a separatist, made his second voyage to the new world in the Mayflower (180 tons) in 1620. He had previously sailed from here in the Sea Venture (300 tons) on July 23, 1609. He reached virginia in 1610, after having been driven ashore in Bermuda, where his shipwreck furnished the subject for The Tempest 1611) by William Shakespeare.

    "The General Society of Mayflower Descendants (U.S.A., 1897)
    Waldo Morgan Allen, Governor General

    "On their first pilgrimage - 152, by planes - to The Netherlands and England
    September 22 - October 6, 1955
    335 years after the sailing of the Mayflower"

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  • SurfaceTravel's Profile Photo

    Plymouth Plaques: Mayflower, Thomas Townes

    by SurfaceTravel Written Sep 13, 2012

    Favorite thing: A plaque by the Mayflower Steps, Plymouth, UK

    "On the 6th of September, 1620, in the Mayoralty of Thomas Townes, after being 'kindly entertained and courteously used by divers Friends there dwelling', the Pilgrim Fathers sailed from Plymouth in the Mayflower, in the Providence of God to settle in NEW PLYMOUTH, and to lay the foundation of the NEW ENGLAND STATES.

    "The Ancient Cawsey whence they embarked was destroyed not many Years afterwards, but the Site of their Embarkation is marked by the Stone bearing the name of the MAYFLOWER in the pavement of the adjacent Pier. This Tablet was erected in the Mayoralty of J.T. Bond 1891, to commemorate their Departure, and the visit to Plymouth in July of that Year of a number of their descendants and Representatives."

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  • spidermiss's Profile Photo

    Plymouth's Tourist Information Centre

    by spidermiss Updated Mar 14, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Plymouth Visitor Information Centre
    1 more image

    Favorite thing: This helpful Tourist Information Centre is situated in the Maritime Barbican Village. The Centre can advise the visitor about accommodation, sightseeing, events and so forth. There is a wide range of leaflets on attractions not just in Plymouth but in Devon and Cornwall.

    Here is the centre's website for planning a trip to Plymouth.

    The Mayflower Exhibition is also housed in the building and there is a shop selling a variety of souvenirs and gifts.

    The Tourist Information Centre is opened everyday in high season and Monday to Saturday in low season.

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  • grayfo's Profile Photo

    History of Plymouth

    by grayfo Written Oct 7, 2011
    Map of Plymouth ��� 1643

    Favorite thing: The origins of Plymouth can be traced back to the Bronze Age, when its first settlement grew at Mount Batten. This settlement continued to grow as a trading post for the Roman Empire, until farmland on a small peninsula at the mouth of the river Plym, referred to in the Domesday Book in 1086 as Sudtone, meaning South Farm, developed into Sutton Harbour, the start of medieval Plymouth. In 1620 the Pilgrim Fathers left Plymouth for the New World and established Plymouth Colony – the second English settlement in what is now the United States of America.

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  • johngayton's Profile Photo

    Plymouth Barbican Tourist Information Centre

    by johngayton Written Jul 11, 2011
    Barbican TIC, Mayflower Centre

    Favorite thing: Plymouth's main Tourist Information Centre is located in the Mayflower building down on the main street in the Barbican, pretty much opposite the Mayflower Steps.

    Here friendly and knowledgeable staff can provide assistance and advice on most queries including assistance with accommodation, public transport info, things to do etc. They also act as agents for local theatres and other events and as well as the usual freebie leaflets the centre has a range of local maps, guidebooks and souvenirs for sale.

    For the TIC online click HERE

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  • johngayton's Profile Photo

    Mutley Plain - Another Village Within The City

    by johngayton Written Nov 22, 2010
    Mutley Plain
    1 more image

    Favorite thing: Plymouth is a city of distinct neighbourhoods the best-known of which, certainly for tourists, is the history-rich Barbican. Equally interesting is the area of Mutley Plain, or just plain Mutley as it is referred to locally.

    In the 1800's this was the city's gentrified suburb but as the city expanded the gentry moved out and the area became run-down. The modern Mutley though is now the city's student centre which makes it one of the liveliest suburbs with loads of decent pubs, cheap restaurants and great nightlife, including the live music pub The Junction which features mostly local rock bands.

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  • johngayton's Profile Photo

    City Centre Street Maps

    by johngayton Written Nov 15, 2010
    Street Map At Railway Station

    Favorite thing: Most of the city centre is a pedestrian zone with only one of its cross streets accessible by motor vehicles, including buses. In order to help people find there way around the city council has put up these useful street maps at strategic locations.

    At first sight you might think the map is a sort schematic diagram (a bit like that of a railway or the London Underground) but the city centre rea\lly is laid out like this. The post-WWII planners designed the city to be pedestrian-friendly, open and easy to navigate and the map is a pretty accurate representation.

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  • yozza2005's Profile Photo

    Train station to City Centre travel

    by yozza2005 Updated Aug 17, 2008

    Favorite thing: Avoid taking a taxi from the train station to the city centre.
    Firstly it's only 5minutes (easy) walk to the main shopping streets.
    Secondly, you'll be ripped off in a cab.
    Thirdly, help the environment by cutting out unnecessary short journeys by car(taxi).

    For those looking to reach the University, this is about 3-5minutes walk from the Train Station.

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  • Over-looked and misunderstood

    by lucyt Written Jul 20, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Pilgrims Point
    2 more images

    Favorite thing: Pilgrims Point, Mayflower Steps, Barbican, Plymouth

    For those who are experience Plymouth on a day to day basis it often comes as a little to bump into things that pertain to its more illustrious past. Generally speaking, as a town it's definitely a 6/10, could do better. (See me after the class please.)
    It's incredibly easy to see only the shops, pubs and drunks and ignore its history.

    To this end I offer some shots and the like of the Pilgrim Steps - the area from which a band of brave souls decided to try to create their own future and build a new culture in their own image.
    It was a noble gesture - and a very brave one.

    The first plaque reads: 'On the 6th of September 1620, the Mayorality of Thomas Townes after being kindly entertained and courteously used by divers Friends there dwelling, the Pilgrim Fathers sailed from Plymouth in the Mayflower in the Providence of God to settle in New Plymouth and to lay the foundations of the New England States The ancient Cawsey whence they embarked was destroyed not many Years afterwards but the Site of their Embarkation is marked by the Stone bearing the name of the MAYFLOWER in the pavement of the adjacent Pier.
    This Tablet was erected in the Mayoralty of J T Bond 1891, to commemorate the Departure, and the visit to Plymouth in July of that Year of a number of their Descendants and Representatives.'

    And, lest we forget the Kiwis: 'This tablet commemorates the departure for Plymouth in May 1839 of The Tory, the pioneer ship in the colonisation of New Zealand'

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  • Maeniel's Profile Photo

    Royal Parade

    by Maeniel Updated Apr 21, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Mostly Boring,Sometimes Fantastic!

    Favorite thing: Not so much a favourite thing, but worthy of a mention, and this is the best category, so... This is nothing but a street, but it is THE place where all of Plymouth's parades, such as on The Lord Mayors Day are held and there a lot of historical monuments along it. So, if you orient yourself with this in mind, you are well away. There are nine things worth seeing along this one strip alone, so don't be so fast to dismiss it as just another street.

    It is also good to know because it is central and everybody knows where it is.

    The sorts of things you will see, will include the Theatre Royal, 'The Bank' Public House, St. Andrews Cathedral, The City Guildhall, Prysten House (Old Building and Museum) and the Painted Underpass which shows the history of Plymouth in pictures.

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  • Monique_T's Profile Photo

    Heaven in Cornwall?

    by Monique_T Updated Mar 19, 2003

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Fondest memory: Cornwall is beautifull. Along the sea, beaches, cliffs and rocks, it is great to walk around. Sometimes it felt like I was the only person on earth. It is something I can not really describe, it is something you have to feel. So all I can say is...go there and feel what I felt.

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  • I don't actually live in...

    by tamlandells Updated Aug 26, 2002

    Favorite thing: I don't actually live in Plymouth but middle of nowwhere near Bude...only thing VT came up with.

    Fondest memory: Favourite memory is sitting on the cliff tops of Widemouth Bay, outside Bude, watching the sun go down having a smoke and eating off the BBQ with friends...then going onto a free party (of which there are many during summer normally on the beaches but have to keep ear to the ground!)...perfect!

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  • Miffy's Profile Photo

    Exeter, right, we're talking...

    by Miffy Written Aug 26, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Exeter, right, we're talking about Exeter.
    Many tourists don't know that in hidden places around Exeter there are some fantastic community mosaics, mostly made or devised by mosaics expert Elaine Goodwin. My mum wrote a book about them! This isn't a commercial but you can see it on Amazon at http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0950587389/qid=1015956189/sr=1-4/ref=sr 1_0_4/026-3129144-4998842 (v cheap!).
    We had a lovely half day last time I was down, walking round and having a look. They are unusual in that they often include non-tile objects like badges, scrabble tiles, etc - I'm going to add some photos v soon. There are quite a lot in St Thomas (the area over the river) but you might need a local to point them out to you.

    Fondest memory: My teenage years were spent sitting on the Cathedral Green or in Hoopern Fields with big gangs of friends. In the summer there are often guitarists on the Green.

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