Plymouth Off The Beaten Path

  • Charles Church, Plymouth
    Charles Church, Plymouth
    by spidermiss
  • Charles Church, Plymouth
    Charles Church, Plymouth
    by spidermiss
  • Charles Church, Plymouth
    Charles Church, Plymouth
    by spidermiss

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Plymouth

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    Roland Levinsky Building (Plymouth University)

    by spidermiss Updated Mar 16, 2012
    Roland Levinsky Campus, Plymouth University
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    This Plymouth University's campus renowned for its architecture and incorporating environmental and sustainable elements. You can read more about it via its website website.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Study Abroad

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    Charles Church

    by spidermiss Updated Mar 16, 2012

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    Charles Church, Plymouth
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    This church was built over 300 years ago and was one of Plymouth's leading churches where Dr Robert Hawker was an influential figure. In March 1941 the church was burnt with the bombing raid over the city. Today the derelict church serves as a spiritual monument and memorial (to city's blitz and loss of lives during World War II) on a busy roundabout when one approaches the city centre.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Photography
    • Historical Travel

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  • johngayton's Profile Photo

    St Dunstan's Abbey School

    by johngayton Written Nov 23, 2011
    Main Entrance
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    Although situated on New North Road, quite close to the city centre, the striking St Dunstan's Abbey isn't actually on any tourist map. It is though worth a visit if you are interested in Gothic architecture and a bit of Plymouth's history.

    St Dunstan's Abbey was founded in 1850 by a Miss Priscilla Sellon, a naval officer's daughter who was devoted to the education of Plymouth's poor and specifically in response to the Bishop of Exeter's appeal at the time - " to relieve the spiritual and moral destitution of Devonport"

    To this end she established a total of "five schools and with financial support from supporters she set up an orphanage for girls; homes for destitute girls; an industrial school for young women; a college for boy sailors; and evening classes for adults. Using her own money she purchased tenements to rent out to the poor in return for them adopting more moral ways and set up a printing press for unemployed females who might otherwise succumb to prostitution to earn money."

    She was also the founder of the Church of England Sisterhood of Mercy and during the 1849 cholera epidemic she and her fellow sisters established a hospital on what was to become the site of the present Abbey. Following the end of the outbreak (during which time the hospital successfully treated over 170 patients) she changed the name of the order to the Society of the Most Holy Trinity and laid the foundation stone of a new nunnery on the hospital's site which she dedicated to St Dunstan.

    By 1906 there were only a few nuns left here at this site and the building was taken over by the Community of St Mary The Virgin at Wantage and became the St Dunstan Abbey School For Girls.

    In 2004 this became part of the independent co-education Plymouth College.

    Website below has a bit more history.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Photography
    • Architecture

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    Try to find the artist's...

    by jmbredeck Updated Nov 15, 2011

    Try to find the artist's studio who has made an intriguing career of painting Plymouth's more attractive women nude, writing texts on Art and - in general - living the life of the stereotypical, long-haired, suffering, dressed in black Artiste. I think his name is R. Lenkiewiz

    2011 footnote: Robert Lenkiewicz died of a heart attack in 2002: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Lenkiewicz#Move_to_Plymouth

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    Mount Edgecombe

    by freya_heaven Updated Feb 6, 2005

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    Mount Edgecombe Orangery

    Mount Edgecombe is a country park & a stately home built in 1547, by the Edgecombe family. It was sold to Plymouth & Cornwall Council's in 1971.

    The House was bombed during the war & gutted by fire, it has since been renovated. The House sits in 856 acres of beautiful coastal land, most of which is open to the public for free. This is a beautiful place to spend a relaxing day, try to come in the week when it is much quieter.

    Have to admit Mount Egdcombe is in Cornwall, but it is only a 5 minute ferry ride from Plymouth, ( see transport tips)

    The photo is the Orangery, built in 1760, which is now a restaurant & the Italian Garden. I felt the plants in the Italian Garden are reminiscent of a council roundabout! Nice trees & statues though.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • National/State Park
    • Architecture

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    Dartmoor National Park

    by margaretvn Updated May 17, 2003

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    This beautiful Park is famous for many things, for example it was the setting for the Conan Doyle novel “The Hound of the Baskervilles”. That novel paints a picture of the bleak and isolated open moor with the most secure prison (Princetown) of Britain in its centre. Dartmoor is more though with fine walking opportunities, waterfalls, and lovely little villages with thatched houses and plenty of chances to have a “cream tea”. The Dartmoor ponies, a small tough breed of ponies, they have lived wild on the moor since at least the 10th century and they are a much-loved symbol of this part of Britain. All around there are scores of prehistoric remains such as Grimspound, with impressive Bronze Age huts, which were built nearly 4,000 years ago.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Mountain Climbing
    • National/State Park

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    Mix History & Countryside

    by Maeniel Updated Mar 3, 2003

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    Some of the Plymbridge Woods Scenery

    Nearby to Plymouth is the historical and beautiful Plymbridge woods. In the past, this area was heavily involved in the mining industry and it is dotted with the ruins of past structures. Follow the river for some time and enjoy the sights. Bring a packed lunch.

    It is well signposted and these signs provide a great deal of information on the area and the history.

    Particularly Good and Well Known for Cycling Expeditions.

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Cycling

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  • Geoff_Wright's Profile Photo

    Nowhere near Plymouth, so well...

    by Geoff_Wright Updated Sep 12, 2002

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    Nice Dog!!

    Nowhere near Plymouth, so well off the Beaten Path, is my house! We had two surprise VT visitors call in the other day. Here is a photo of myself, Sally (Linky Pinky from Kent), and Mary (Mary Golda). Sally's friend, Trish took the photo and has now joined VT as 'Trishywishy'. Trish lives in Southampton. When VT create all the promised new locations, I hope that there will be some in Cornwall, where I can redo my pages nearer to home!

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  • Linky_Pinky's Profile Photo

    St. Michaels Mount just a...

    by Linky_Pinky Written Aug 26, 2002

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    St. Michaels Mount just a short boat trip out to the island from Marzion, or walk across the causeway when the tide is out.
    Fantastic place
    Boat trip £1 each way
    Entrance to the Castel/Abbey £4.60 Well worth it!

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    Mousehole pronounced Mousell,...

    by Linky_Pinky Written Aug 26, 2002

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    Mousehole pronounced Mousell, is a beautiful little unspoilt harbour and village, with fishing boats landing their catch and fishermen mending their nets.
    There are windy little street with beautiful little cottages and their gardens lots are for rent or B&B's

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  • The South Hams villages of...

    by Scott_UK Written Aug 26, 2002

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    The South Hams villages of Heybrook bay and Wembury are often missed by tourists, but are situated at the entrance to the Yealm estuary and overlooking Plymouth sound.
    Wembury bay is popular with surfers and is quite a picturesque place with the Mewstone island prominent in the bay. I am biased though, this is where i lived for my formative years ;)
    A bit off the beaten track, but Langdon court serves good meals and a great pint of Guinness. Lots of smuggling history too !!!



    http://www.langdoncourt.co.uk/

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  • Miffy's Profile Photo

    Just a short bus journey from...

    by Miffy Written Aug 26, 2002

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    Just a short bus journey from Exeter is Torquay - it's a nice trip too, across Devonshire hills. Call me a big kid, but there is an attraction there I just love: Babbacombe Model Village. We used to go there on school trips when I was a kid; recently I nagged my Mum into coming with me again. Actually she enjoyed it too - especially seeing the miniature grass and trees they use for landscaping. In the high season there is a free bus from Torquay town centre - the rest of the time you'll have to take a standard bus and ask the driver where to get off.
    Have a look at their website: http://www.babbacombemodelvillage.co.uk/
    Here's a picture. Can you see why I love it???? Or is it just me? I'd go and see every model village in the world if I could. In fact I'd like to build one.

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    Exeter University has a really...

    by Miffy Written Aug 26, 2002

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    Exeter University has a really lovely landscaped campus, with trees from every land, duck-ponds, stepping stones, hidden lakes and some lovely buildings (some pretty grim ones too). On this campus you'll also find the Northcott theatre and the Lemon Grove which is a small venue for uni gigs (but I think everyone can enter).
    Campus: http://www.ex.ac.uk/admin/be/grounds1969/index.htm
    Really worth a look for its photos.
    Northcott Theatre: http://www.northcott-theatre.co.uk/
    (they do films as well as some really excellent theatre).
    Lemon Grove: http://www.guild.ex.ac.uk/commercial/trading/lemon-grove.htm
    (This venue is a bit after my time I'm afraid so I can't tell you much about it).

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  • Miffy's Profile Photo

    Bit of an off-beat one this,...

    by Miffy Written Aug 26, 2002

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    Bit of an off-beat one this, but if you go to the cafe at the top of Debenhams you can get some really good photos from a high perspective. There's an ancient law in Exeter that forbids the building of anything higher than the Cathedral but somehow Debenhams got away with it. You can also have some coffee and a piece of fudge cake, but I think there are probably better places to eat.

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    Take a bus to Buckfastleigh,...

    by Miffy Written Aug 26, 2002

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    Take a bus to Buckfastleigh, or even better, take the steam railway from Totnes, which stops right outside the otter sanctuary. It's only a small place but knowledgable keepers show you round the otters they've saved and you can stand in a tunnel under the water to watch them dive for food. Lovely for animal lovers. Others may find the otter smell rather disturbing. Culture lovers shouldn't worry - just down the road is Buckfast Abbey, a monastic community open to the public with an impressive Abbey church, visitor centre, and a chance to buy their goods, such as honey made on the premises.
    URLs: http://www.buckfast.org.uk/
    http://www.ottersandbutterflies.co.uk/

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Plymouth Off The Beaten Path

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