Kimmeridge Off The Beaten Path

  • Wild Primroses growing at Tyneham Village
    Wild Primroses growing at Tyneham...
    by easyoar
  • Snowdrops in Tyneham
    Snowdrops in Tyneham
    by easyoar
  • Wild Deer grazing
    Wild Deer grazing
    by easyoar

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Kimmeridge

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    Memorial with a sense of humour

    by easyoar Updated Mar 19, 2005

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    Memorial with a sense of humour

    It is not uncommon in Britain to see benches placed in parks with little plaques on. These normally commemorate a dead person and have some sober words about them written onto the plaque.

    This bench in Tyneham village however had a plaque that had a sense of humour. You'll probably need to enlarge the photo to see it, but in case you can't be bothered, it says:

    Bob Redrup

    1946 - 2003

    Aging Cyclist

    Related to:
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    Lots of decaying things

    by easyoar Written Mar 19, 2005

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    Lots of decaying things

    Most of the buildings in Tyneham Village are badly decayed. However in some parts, even the trees look like they are under attack from decay.

    This picture was taken near the manor house, where there was a small wood of trees that all seemed to be covered in this lichen type thing. I'm not sure if it is parasitic, or whether it is just growing in some sort of symbiotic relationship, or whether it is just a neutral base to grow on.

    It does make the trees look a bit strange though when they are all green and hairy like this one!

    Related to:
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    Wild Deer

    by easyoar Written Mar 19, 2005

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    Wild Deer grazing

    Needless to say, Wild Deer are very shy animals (especially when they live around a shooting range!). It is therefore not very easy to get that close to them, and I took this picture at quite some distance. The other thing stopping me getting to close is that there were in the middle of the firing range, so it was better not to try to get too close!

    The deer don't seem to mind distant viewers anyway! This small herd were grazing on grass, so it was very easy to shoot them all (with my camera of course).

    There are also lots of sheep about, but the deer stick out quite well with their much darker coats.

    Related to:
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    • Eco-Tourism

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    Snowdrops in Tyneham

    by easyoar Written Mar 17, 2005

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    Snowdrops in Tyneham

    Snowdrops are not very big. They are little bigger than grass and the leaves are very similar in size, shape and colour to the blades of grass.

    The flowers themselves are quite small but the stalks they are on grow above the leaves and then hang down.

    There are many different varieties of snowdrops. The ones in this picture have one flower on each flower stalk. Many other varieties have a double flower (i.e. two flowers per stalk). If you are buying snowdrop bulbs, you normally find that the double headed varieties cost a bit more than the single headed ones.

    Apparently there are also snowdrops in Bulgaria, only they are called 'kokicheta' over there. Thanks to VT hekate for that one!

    These ones were growing against an abandoned house in Tyneham Village in early March.

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    Periwinkle with blue flowers

    by easyoar Written Mar 17, 2005

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    Periwinkle flowering at Tyneham Village

    This Periwinkle with blue flowers is known as the lesser periwinkle (Vinca minor). It is also known as the common periwinkle and is also referred to as the myrtle.

    Periwinkles are a perennial, evergreen herb. It was originally a plant that was native to the island of Madagascar. It has been cultivated by humans for many centuries. It is now found growing wild in in many parts of the world (warm regions).

    Periwinkle plants grow up to two feet (60cm) high. They have glossy, dark green leaves (1-2 inches long) and it flowers for several months.

    Periwinkle has over the years been used to treat a many different diseases. In Europe it was used as a folk remedy for diabetes for several hundred years.

    This plant was growing against the wall of a house in Tyneham Village.

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    Daffodils at Tyneham

    by easyoar Written Mar 17, 2005

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    Daffodil in Tyneham Village Churchyard

    I don't believe Daffodils to be a native British plant, but these days you wouldn't know that to be the case. In and around March every year, Daffodils can be seen growing everywhere in Britain.

    I guess that is partly because they look nice and also becaiuse they are one of the easiest flowers to grow in the British climate. A Daffodil is a bulb, which is a 'root' that looks a little like a light bulb in shape. It lives underground and most of the time you don't even know it is there. Then around March time (it needs a cold winter to tell it to grow) it pops up and flowers before dying back and disappearing again until the next year. For this reason you don't tend to see them in hot climates.

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    Primroses

    by easyoar Written Mar 17, 2005

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    Wild Primroses growing at Tyneham Village

    Primroses are a very traditional British plant that flowers in spring time and has 'primrose yellow' flowers. It is quite a small plant, and could be easily trampled underfoot, so please take care! To my knowledge it is directly related to the Primula which you often see in gardens.

    As Tyneham Village is abandoned, nature is taking its course, and there are lots of wild flowers growing around. A visit in early March is a great time to go if you want to see all of these flowers out.

    Follow the Road signs from Kimmeridge Bay to get to Tyneham Village and park in the car park provided.

    Related to:
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    • National/State Park
    • Family Travel

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Kimmeridge Off The Beaten Path

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