Kimmeridge Things to Do

  • The road from Wareham to Kimmeridge.
    The road from Wareham to Kimmeridge.
    by CDM7
  • !848 thatched cottage in Kimmeridge village
    !848 thatched cottage in Kimmeridge...
    by CDM7
  • Things to Do
    by CDM7

Most Recent Things to Do in Kimmeridge

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    Walk from Kimmeridge village to Kimmeridge Bay

    by CDM7 Updated Nov 13, 2013
    The road from Wareham to Kimmeridge.
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    The walk starts at the car park next to the Clavell Cafe,which is a lovely place for a coffee,lunch or cream tea.From the car park turn left and this will take you through this pretty village with its thatched cottages.As you carry on towards the sea the road takes you through green fields with sheep grazing on the hillside.After you pass the Kimmeridge Bay half mile sign the road starts descending towards the bay.From here you have lovely views (weather permitting) across to Portland Bill.

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    • Hiking and Walking
    • Diving and Snorkeling

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    The pebble beach in Kimmeridge

    by ettiewyn Updated May 28, 2012

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    The pebble beach in Kimmeridge is a very rocky beach, and you need to climb and clamber a lot in order to get to the spots where the fossils are supposed to be found. It is very important to take some proper shoes - I really don't think I could have done it in flip-flops.

    Although there is no sand at all here, I found it to be a very nice beach. The views out to the sea and to the cliffs on the western side are very pretty, and I just liked the atmosphere very much. Still, I don't think I would come here for anything else than fossil hunting. Going for a walk or swim would be a hassle with all these rocks, stones and pebbles.

    Further to the west, there was a beach that looked much nicer (as far as I was able to judge from afar), and there were many surfers. They had parked their vans on the parking lot and clearly enjoyed the good weather!

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    Fossil hunting!

    by ettiewyn Written May 28, 2012

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    I was excited to try fossil hunting for the first time in my life! Our guide told us what to do, but when I started, I soon developed an own technique which seemed to be more obvious to me. Some stones were made up of different layers, and I just cracked those up - and often found a small treasure inside! Altogether I found eight fossils! Wow, I was really happy - I had not expected this and would even have been happy with just one!

    We were twelve in our group, and while one girl found two fossils, the others did not find anything. I am not sure if I had just found a lucky spot (I found all eight very close together), or if they had just not been looking properly (maybe they were not really interested, or were searching for very big ones, thus overlooking the small bits).

    I gave two of the fossils to my dad as a souvenir, I think it is a nice present to bring back home.

    Unfortunately I am not knowledgeable about fossils, so I cannot tell you how old these are, or what they once were. If you know more and can tell me, please don't hesitate to do so :-)

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    • Historical Travel

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    Lovely green landscape :-)

    by ettiewyn Updated May 28, 2012

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    Something I really enjoyed was the lovely green landscape in Kimmeridge. Deep green fields which looked like the epitomization of England! They formed a nice contrast to the blue sea on the horizon. It looked really picturesque, and driving through here was great - I tried to take pictures of it out of the bus, and fortunately they turned out quite well. I had not expected to see a landscape like this so close to the sea!

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    Guided tour from Bournemouth

    by ettiewyn Written May 28, 2012

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    From Bournemouth, I did a guided tour to visit Lulworth Cove and Durdle Door and Corfe Castle. The itinerary was: Ferry from Poole Harbour to the Isle of Purbeck - Studland Beach - Swanage - cliff top walk at Durlston Country Park - Corfe Castle - Kimmeridge (fossil hunting) - Lulworth Cove, Durdle Door, Man O'War.

    It was a beautiful day and I enjoyed everything we saw and did, it was simply stunning and the itinerary was very good. Unfortunately, though, the guide was not good and in fact one of the worst guides I ever had. However, I still believe that it is a good company. They sent a questionnaire about the tour afterwards and I wrote that the guide was not good, and they got back to me asking for further details. They were very friendly and promised to talk about it with the guide. I had the impression that they really cared about my feedback. Thus, I would definitely book with this company again.

    I did the "Jurassic Coast" tour with them, but they also have a few others on offer, for example one to the Isle of Wight, one to the New Forest, and several "Express Tours" to places like Oxford and Bath. All tours leave from Bournemouth. The tours are small group tours in a small bus with no more than sixteen passengers.

    Their website is: www.discoverdorset.co.uk

    Kimmeridge was a stop of about thirty minutes. This was very good, we had enough time to search for fossils, but not so long as to get bored after a while.

    Picture 1 & 2: Man O'War and Durdle Door in Lulworth
    Picture 3 & 4: Corfe Castle
    Picture 5: Clifftop Walk in Durlston Country Park, Swanage

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    • Castles and Palaces
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • smirnofforiginal's Profile Photo

    Fossils

    by smirnofforiginal Updated Dec 15, 2010

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    ...you never know quite what you'll find!!!

    To be fair, I mostly covered all I can say in my introduction to Kimmeridge.
    Here is a great place to come but, it is not Lyme Regis which has a bit of a free for all attitude.
    It deserves respect and it for a more tranquil, quiet encounter with the old periods!

    If you have children it will get their imaginations running roit and has some some fantastic rock pools too. You should be aware of how slippery the rock platform here is (very, very), you should probably not trust the cliff faces too much and we were warned against the tide here but it was well out so was not a consideration.

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    • Beaches

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    A Donkey Drill and The Black Tower!

    by smirnofforiginal Written Dec 15, 2010

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    Of perhaps little interest but up on the cliffs there is a BP donkey drill which has been steadily pumping up oil since the 1950s and there is also a small folly.

    As far as I know there is nothing remotely special, unusual or interesting about the folly other than it had to be taken to pieces and then put back together 35m further inland due to the cliff erosion! It is apparently somewhere one can book as accommodation which I would imagine would make for quite an inspiring place to stay!

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    Inside an abandoned house at Tyneham Village

    by easyoar Written Mar 19, 2005

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    Inside an abandoned house at Tyneham Village

    The last tip showed a view into the abandoned manor house that still contained a lot of fallen rubble. This picture on the other hand shows the inside of a house that has been cleared and is safe for viewing, and indeed exploring.

    Children seem to love the houses, as they can chase eachother through passageways and through empty window frames.

    In some buildings it is possible to see where the posts that the floor boards were nailed down to were stuck into the walls, as well as old fire places etc.

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    • National/State Park
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

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    Entrance to the Old Manor House in Tyneham

    by easyoar Written Mar 19, 2005

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    Entrance to the Old Manor House in Tyneham

    This picture shows the entrance to the Old Manor House in Tyneham Village. I show this picture for two reasons:

    (1) - It shows how grand it must have been when the house was in it's prime. A lot of care and attention have been put into the door frame

    (2) - You can see that the inside is still a mess, and that the entrance has been blocked off to stop people going inside what is still a dangerous place.

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    Best Overall View of Tyneham Village

    by easyoar Written Mar 19, 2005

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    Best Overall View of Tyneham Village

    The Best Overall View of Tyneham Village, is as you have parked in the carpark, and you stroll back down the slope towards the village.

    From here (and in this photo, although you may well need to enlarge it!) you can see the duckpond, the church at the back of the picture, some ruined houses on the left, the telephone box on the right of the ruined houses.

    The school house and mnaor house cannot be seen as they are behind the ruined houses. The village is pretty small, so it dos not take long to just walk around it.

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    • Family Travel

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    The Old Manor House at Tyneham Village

    by easyoar Written Mar 19, 2005

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    The Old Manor House at Tyneham Village

    The Old Manor House at Tyneham Village is by far the biggest building that anybody lived in (the only othe rbuilding of comparable size is the church). Some of this building has been cleared (of the fallen roof and floorbaords etc), and it is possible to go inside. Other bits have not been cleared and are dangerous to go inside. These bits are well signposted, and entrance is blocked to all but the most determined of people to ignore them.

    The building itself appears to have been a bungalow which is unusual by Manor House standards, and also most of the buildings in the village seem to hav had an upstairs.

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    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Inside Tyneham Village School House

    by easyoar Written Mar 19, 2005

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    Inside Tyneham Village School House

    As you saw in the previous tip, the school house is a small building that is just one big (or not so big!) classroom. The building is now a museum, and it is possible to visit inside.

    Unfortunately, when I visitied, the building had closed for the day, but it was still possible to see through the window, so I found a clean bit and pressed my camera lens right up against the glass to stop any reflections.

    You can see the old desks, the blackboard, a teachers desk, and very unusually, a Union Jack flag. I have never been in a school (in the UK anyway) that has a flag inside it like this. Whether this was put there during the war for patriotism purposes, or whether these sorts of things were done in those days, I don't know. I'm sure US readers will be surprised to hear there are no flags in British schools! I can imagine they have plenty in theirs...

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    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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    Tyneham Village School House

    by easyoar Written Mar 19, 2005

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    Tyneham Village School House

    Other than the Church, the only other building in the whole of Tyneham Village that has a roof on it is the school house. It has been turned into a museum and the inside looks like what it would have done when it was still being used.

    There is only one classroom inside, so children of all ages would have been taught together. You can see from this picture that the building is also very small.

    I'm not sure how restored this building is, or whether it has just been maintained well from when the village was taken over by the army during the Second World War.

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    • Family Travel
    • National/State Park
    • Architecture

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  • easyoar's Profile Photo

    Tyneham Village Church

    by easyoar Written Mar 17, 2005

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    Tyneham Village Church

    Tyneham Village is a small village (that has been abandoned since 1940) and is about 5 miles west of Corfe Castle.

    The village originally dates back beyond medieval times. It had been a small and thriving community. However during World War II, the village was taken over by the military in 1940 to be used as a training ground and as a staging ground for the D-Day Landings. After the war the village remained under military control and so the locals did not get their houses back. For the last 50+ years the area has been used as a target area for the tanks stationed at the nearby barrack. This does not mean the actual houses themselves, just the surrounding hillsides.

    These days only the church (which you can see here) and the school remain intact, and as the school is a museum, the church remains the only functioning building there. This picture was taken in early March 2005 and you can see the Daffodils out (yellow flowers).

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    Old Telephone Handset

    by easyoar Written Mar 17, 2005

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    Old Telephone Handset pre-1935

    Inside the Pre-1935 Telephone Kiosk that you saw in the previous tip, there are lots of old adverts from the time. There is also an old telephone handset.

    I believe the kiosk itself is sealed and so it is not possible to get inside, but it is possible to look through the glass (which is what you see here in the photo).

    It's not surprising that the kiosk and phone are pre-1935. Tyneham Village was forcibly abandoned during World War II when the army needed the area to prepare for the D-Day landings in Normandy, France. Since then no-one has lived in the village, and it is being preserved as it was at the time. WWII was from 1939 to 1945 with the D-Day landings being towards the end of this period.

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    • Seniors
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

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