Lyme Regis Warnings and Dangers

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    Lyme Bay
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  • Unstable cliffs.
    Unstable cliffs.
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Most Recent Warnings and Dangers in Lyme Regis

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    Guidance on photography in churches: Homer's Rules

    by CatherineReichardt Written Oct 17, 2011

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    Visiting churches is one of the absolute highlights of a trip to Europe, and provides a fascinating insight into the culture which has shaped European cultures of the past couple of millenia.

    Unlike some other religions - where access to places of worship may be restricted to members of that religious group or a specific gender - the vast majority of Christian churches will allow tourists to visit at most times, including routine services (although some may charge an admission fee for doing so, and access may be denied for private events such as weddings and funerals). However, tourists need to bear in mind that most churches are still active places of worship, and so visitors need to exhibit a certain sensitivity to display respect to the culture and avoid giving offence to people at prayer.

    The following guidelines are based on wonderful advice offered by Homer (homaned) - who does this for a living - in a forum response, and although specifically written for Christian places of worship, would apply equally to places of worship for other religions

    So, here is a general list of do's and don'ts for people wishing to photograph during a church service:

    READ THE SIGNS
    If photography is not permitted - because, for example, it may damage paint on delicate murals - this will usually be indicated by a pictogram of a camera with a red line through it. Under most circumstances, you can assume that photography will be allowed (unless otherwise indicated), but may not be permitted during services. If in doubt, ask for clarification - this shows respect and will very seldom be met with anything other than a helpful response.

    TURN OFF YOUR FLASH!
    Every camera on the market has a button on it which will turn off the flash. The number one most alarming and distracting thing that can happen during a liturgy, and one which will even get you kicked out of some churches, is the bright flash that goes off when you take a picture. Not only is it distracting, but it usually makes the picture turn out dark, because your camera's flash only has about a 10-15' range. Turn off the flash, and hold the camera up against your eye, using the viewfinder, and you will likely get a better picture (and you definitely won't have any red-eye problems!).

    DON'T MOVE AROUND ALL OVER THE PLACE! (UNLESS YOU HAVE PERMISSION)
    Instead of walking all over down the main aisle and in front of everybody, pick a good place from which to take a picture at the beginning of the liturgy, and stay there. Unless you're a professional photographer with practice at stealthily moving during liturgies, you're a distraction, and you're being disrespectful. Even if you're a pro, try to stick to one out-of-the-way place, and use a zoom lens and zoom in to get pictures. Walking in front of people is a surefire way to distract and disrespect and closing in on priests or other celebrants just to capitalise on a photo opportunity is offensive.

    TURN OFF THE CAMERA'S SOUND!
    Every camera has some way to mute all its 'cute' beeps and clicking noises. If you press a button, and hear a beep, or if you take a picture and hear an obnoxious shutter clicking sound, you need to turn off those sounds (the muting option is usually in one of the menus). Along with the flashing, it's an obvious sign that someone is taking pictures and not showing much respect for those trying to pay attention to the liturgy.

    TURN OFF the 'focus assist' light!
    If your camera can't focus without the little laser-light that shines in everyone's eyes before your camera takes a picture, then don't use your camera. You have to turn that light off! It is very distracting to be watching a lector or priest, and see a little red dot or lines pop up on his face all of the sudden. It's as if some rifleman is making his mark! Turn the light off (again, look in the menus for the option to turn off the 'AF assist' or 'focus assist' light). If you can't turn it off, put a piece of duct tape or some other opaque material over the area where the light is, so the light won't shine on someone.

    TURN OFF THE CAMERA'S LCD!
    You should never use the LCD to compose your shots anyways; just put your eye up to the viewfinder, and that will not only not distract, it will also steady your camera against your face, making for a better picture (especially if you don't have the flash on). And if you must review the pictures you've taken, hold the camera in front of you, down low, so people behind you don't notice the big, bright LCD display on your camera

    CERTAIN PARTS OF THE CEREMONY ARE PARTICULARLY SENSITIVE
    Photographing the blessing of the eucharist (bread and wine) and distribution of communion to the congregation are considered to be particularly sacred parts of the service, and it is offensive to photograph these activities.

    The main thing is to try to be respectful of the culture and of other people present at the service. Don't distract. And, if you are asked to not take pictures, or if there's a sign saying 'no photography allowed,' then don't take pictures. You can always ask a priest's permission before the liturgy, but if he says 'No,' put away your camera and enjoy the freedom you have to focus on the privilege of being able to share an experience with people who consider these religious rituals core to their culture and identity, rather than focusing on your camera's LCD!

    Homer's Rules ... Homer rules!

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    Beware the landslip.

    by leics Updated Apr 6, 2005

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    Unstable cliffs.

    You may want to explore the landslip to the east of Lyme, but take great care. The earth is still moving, and mudflows can trap you and suck you down. Take care even in summer, weather, as the area rarely dries out fully.

    Remember that all the cliffs along Lyme Bay are unstable, and keep well away from them if the weather has been wet.

    Related to:
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    • Budget Travel
    • Family Travel

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    Watch the tide.

    by leics Updated Apr 6, 2005

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    Lyme Bay

    If you plan to walk from Lyme to Charmouth, or the other way, check the tide times first. You can easily get cut off by Church Cliffs (just east of Lyme) and there is no escape route as the cliffs are almost sheer. People have died there in the past, so take care.

    Watch the mudflows from the landslip too ... they can be very deep and will suck you down.

    Also, if you plan to walk west from Lyme to Pinhay bay, where there are giant ammonite fossils on the beach, check the tide times. It's easy to get cut off here too, though you will probably be able to scramble up the cliff to wait for the tide to turn.

    The tide times are always on display in the window of the tourist information office in Lyme Regis.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Adventure Travel

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