Swanage Things to Do

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Most Recent Things to Do in Swanage

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    The Great Globe

    by CDM7 Written Dec 30, 2014

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    The Great Globe,which is constructed of Portland stone ( quarried a few miles along the coast) weighs 40 tonnes and is one of the largest stone spheres in the world.It can be found just below Durlston Castle close to the sea.The stone slabs which are positioned around the Globe are inscribed with Shakespearean and Biblical passages.

    The Great Globe
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    A Visit To Durlston Castle

    by CDM7 Updated Dec 30, 2014

    The recently renovated Durlston Castle is a Victorian building well worth exploring.Within the castle you will find a shop selling locally made gifts,books and souvenirs.The Seventhwave restaurant serves breakfast,lunch and Dorset cream Teas.There is also a visitor centre with interactive displays and a Gallery which offers a year round programme of exhibitions.The small cinema within the castle gives you an insight into the wildlife and other activities over 12 months at the Durlston Country Park.Well worth seeing!
    Half day tours of the castle are available at certain times of the month.The tour is free but donations welcome.The car park is situated next to the castle,charges apply.

    Durlston Castle Entrance to Seventhwave restaurant. Cinema
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    Swanage Railway

    by CDM7 Updated Oct 29, 2014

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    A nice way to see some of the Purbeck countryside is to take the train between Swanage and Norden, passing Herston Halt,Harmans Cross and Corfe Castle on route.The line runs for 6 miles, although plans are underway to extend this to Wareham.
    WEBCAM - A webcam has now been installed on top of Swanage Railway signal box,enabling steam enthusiasts to watch historic trains with views of Corfe Castle in the background.Just go to the website below.

    Steam train in Swanage Station.
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    Swanage Railway

    by grayfo Written Jul 14, 2014

    The Swanage railway Station is the principle station for the heritage railway service, originally built in 1885 the station has been restored to reflect the 1950’s, it is situated within easy walking distance to the local shops, restaurants, theatre, pier, sea front and beaches. The station shop offers an excellent range of gifts and souvenirs whilst the Station Buffet with its adjacent garden is just the place to chill.

    The railway runs a leisurely twelve mile return trip through the countryside by the Southern branch line of the 1950’s, all in the comfort of a steam hauled train.

    Services run every day from the beginning of April to late October.

    Freedom of the Line (includes admission to the museums at Corfe Castle and Norden.
    Adults: £11.50
    Children (3-15): £7.00
    Children (Under 3): Free

    email info@swanagerailway.co.uk

    June 2014

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    Fishing for crabs!

    by tango_jd Written Jul 13, 2012

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    You can buy crab lines and bait cheaply in several places in the town. This is a great way to entertain the kids (or my grown-up kids).
    The photo shows the stone jetty near the pier-end of the bay but there are a number of suitable places.

    Fishing with a crab line!
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    Swanage Railway

    by himalia11 Updated Jan 9, 2010

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    From Swanage, you can take a stream train to Norden (north of Corfe Castle) which has a large park & ride car park. The train also stops at Herston Halt (on request), Harman's Cross and Corfe Castle. Maybe one time the line will be extended to Wareham which will connect you to the main railway network then. From what I understood some first steam services between Swanage and Wareham already took place in 2009.

    The railway exists since 1885 but was closed in 1972 and the tracks were removed. Later the line was rebuild step by step by a group of enthusiasts. There's a Railway Museum in the village Corfe Castle where you can learn more about the history of the railway and also see railway artefacts.

    The train operates daily from April to October and usually on week-ends otherwise. Also there are special events. Please check their website for the detailed timetable.

    The return fare from Norden to Swange is 9,- £ for adults and 7,- £ for children

    Swanage Railway, from the ruins of Corfe Castle
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    Corfe Castle

    by himalia11 Updated Jan 9, 2010

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    Corfe Castle is an picturesque ruined castle in the village of the same name. The castle looks already great from the car park below and I was impressed by the huge castle grounds and the many remains of the castle.

    The castle was founded in the 11th century by William the Conqueror and was a royal fortress for several hundreds of years. In 1646 during the Civil War the castle was captured by Oliver Cromwell and then was destroyed. So the ruins you see today are the results of the destructions by the Parliamentarians forces. Still there is enough that is left and all these leaning towers and walls look impressive.
    At the entrance we got a sheet with information on the castle and its history in German. There are also some guided tours but we were to late, however while visiting the castle we met a guide who was happy to try his German knowledge and gave us some more information.

    There's a National Trust car park with visitors centre. It's pay & display and was 2 £/ 2 hours, 3 £/ 3 hours, max 4 £/ 4 hours. 50% of this was refunded when we bought the castle ticket. From that car park it's a 10 minutes walk up to the castle.

    Admission: adults 5,36 £, children 2,68 £

    Open daily from 10:00 to 16:00 (17:00 in March/Oct, 18:00 Apr - Sept)

    Corfe Castle from nearby the entrance Corfe Castle Corfe Castle Corfe Castle
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    Ballard Point and Old Harry Rocks

    by himalia11 Written Jan 9, 2010

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    The area north of Swanage is formed of chalk, and the steep white cliffs that you can see from Swanage look really impressive. Ballard Point is the headland close Swanage, and a bit further there's Old Harry Rocks, some bright white pillars in the sea. Unfortunately it was pretty dizzy when we were Swanage, but even then it looked nice. I would have loved to walk to the rocks there, but the time did not permit this, it's a pity we only stayed one night!

    View on the cliffs from Peveril Point
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    Wellington Clock Tower

    by himalia11 Updated Jan 9, 2010

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    The Wellington Clock Tower originally was located in London, next to the London Bridge. It was built in 1854 as memorial to the Duke of Wellingtan. In 1867 it was moved to Swanage in 1867. Obviously it was blocking the traffic and was not needed anymore. Also stone was shipped from Swanage to London and the boats needed some load on the return trip, so they could use some "ballast" - which were some relicts from London in this case.

    Wellington Clock Tower in Swanage
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    Peveril Point

    by himalia11 Written Jan 9, 2010

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    Peveril Point is a rocky reef at the southern end of Swanage bay, with a coastguard hut. From there you have nice views on Swanage Bay and further north to Bournemouth. To the south, you can see the top of Durlston castle in the Durlston Country Park.
    You can walk there along the seafront and the coastal path, however parts of this are flooded at high tide. Another possibility is to walk up the path through Prince Albert Gardens and then along the road.

    Coastguard hut at Peveril Point View towards Durlston Country Park
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    Swanage seafront

    by himalia11 Updated Jan 9, 2010

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    Smanage has a nice promenade & beach and we enjoyed the views over the Swanage Bay towards the white cliffs in the north and Peveril Point to the south. On our way back it was high tide and it was funny to see the waves splashing on the promenade sometimes!
    South of the beach is an old Victorian Pier that was built in 1896. The pier originally was used for paddle steamers to transport the local Purbeck Stone to Poole and London. Now you take boat trips from here, and also it's said to be one of the best diving locations in the UK; so it's no surprise that there also is a diving club.

    You reach Swanage via the A351 from Wareham, or via Bournemouth and Studland using the Sandbanks Ferry. There are several car parks.

    Swanage and the beach Swanage beach Swanage Pier
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    Tell Somebody you Love them, forever!

    by Ken-out-of-Bath Written Jul 29, 2006

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    The Pier in Swanage is run by a registered charity in order to fund the upkeep of this lovely, historical structure.

    For less than the price of an evening meal for two you can purchase a brass plate that will be fastened to the decking of the pier forever! For an additional, modest sum, you can also buy a framed certificate with a photo of your own plate!

    See www.pierfriends.com for more details.

    The Pier funded by Friends. Brass plates Swanage Pier, World Heritage Site

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    Brownsea Island

    by LouiseTopp Written Aug 10, 2005

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    Just off Poole Harbour is Brownsea Island, founder of the scout movement & where anyone who works for the John Lewis partnership (Waitrose etc) can go for a holiday at the castle. The National Trust owns Brownsea & it cost me £7.00 from Swanage pier, & £4.20 landing fee’s. I travelled on the Dorset Bella which took about 30 minutes, you can get fine views of Poole harbour supposed to be one of the biggest natural harbours in the UK. On entering reception the staff are very friendly & you have a map given to you, you can also go on a guided walk.

    On the island are chicken, geese & red squirrels, there’s also a hide that has a hidden camera. There’s a farm with different tractors on display & the scout grounds, the café is nice with outdoor seating & there’s benches facing the open waters where you can watch the boats (including the Condor ferry going to Jersey) sailing by.

    The place is wheelchair friendly although some of the tracks are uneven in places. There’s a shop near the café & you can bring a picnic. The last ferry from the island is 5.15 to Bournemouth, althrough please visit http://www.brownseaislandferries.com/ for information about the ferries.

    Brownsea at sunset
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    Corfe Village

    by LouiseTopp Written Aug 10, 2005

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    Nestled in the isles of the Purbecks is the village of Corfe just up the road from the railway station. Most of the buildings look like their made out of sandstone. This is a good place to spend an afternoon, situated on the A351 halfway between Wareham & Swanage. There’s a little museum that is free to enter although they would like a donation, such artefacts include the old school bell, a 18th century policeman’s hat and gasmasks from the war.

    There’s lot’s of gift shops, pubs & places to eat, one being the National Trust t-rooms, which has a garden facing the castle. They provide a generous pot of tea & many other things, although don’t forget the cream tea.

    They charge £5 to get into the castle, unless your a National Trust member then it's free.

    Corfe Village
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    Steaming around on the right track

    by LouiseTopp Updated Aug 10, 2005

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    Not to be missed, for £5.50 you can hop on a train to the village of Corf. When the train pulls in, it unhooks & goes up the track to reverse back down to the other end; I found this a bit alarming & thought ‘should he be going backwards like that at that speed?’ On board a lady comes round & clips your ticket, you can also see 1960’s diesels cruising up & down. By the railway is a picnic area where you can sit & watch the trains pull up & down all day, there’s also a shop.

    At Corf they have old-fashioned waiting rooms with the fireplaces & leather suitcases on trolleys. Sometimes there might be a charity stall on the platform or special events going on, it’s usually advertised on boards. They will also take wheelchairs, just ask the guard for a yellow ramp.

    There’s a café in a train carriage by the side line where the staff hangout. I always get a bit worried in case the steam trains let off the safety valves, this can be loud & frightening. It’s good that they are keeping something like this going.

    Pulling away from Corf
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Swanage Things to Do

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