Weymouth Things to Do

  • The Fort From The Gardens
    The Fort From The Gardens
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Best Rated Things to Do in Weymouth

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    Brewers Quay

    by Britannia2 Updated Mar 22, 2007

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    Brewers Quay
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    Located at Weymouth's Old Harbour, in beautiful Weymouth Dorset, is the Brewers Quay. What is a Quay? A Quay is a wharf or reinforced bank where ships are loaded or unloaded. Brewers Quay is a remodeled brewery housing an array of attractions and more than 20 specialty shops. The original brewery closed in 1985.
    One of the more popular attractions at Brewers Quay is the Timewalk and Brewery Days attraction. Visitors follow in the footsteps of Miss Paws, the brewery cat, and her feline ancestors, to experience the sights, sounds, and smells of six hundred years of Weymouth and Portland's fascinating past. At the start of the tour, visitors watch the hands of an old clock spin counter-clockwise, to represent time turning back to the 14th century. During the tour, nineteen life-size scenes re-create the history of the area. The tour concludes at the tastings bar, where visitors have the opportunity to sample ales brewed on site by the Quay Brewery.

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    LIGHTHOUSE OF PORTLAND BILL

    by Arkeolog Updated May 13, 2005

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    lighthouse

    As a man who likes lighthouses, Portland Bill is one of the best lighthouses I've ever seen. The location of the lighthouse and the unspoilt scenery makes you relaxed and peaceful. I really miss this place ...

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    Swans , swans and more swans

    by Britannia2 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Swans at Abbotsbury
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    West of Weymouth is the pretty village of Abbotsbury and here is the finest collection of swans I have ever seen. There has been a colony of swans here for over 600 years and they ae protected by the Chesil Beach. There are hundreds of swans here.
    Very well laid walkways link various pens and nests and you can see the swans been fed at 12:00 and 16:00.
    There is a play area for children, a cafe and a gift shop.
    This is one of the most disabled friendly places we have ever visited - it was possible to take the car to the main area missing out a reasonably long walk and the paths were very whhelchair friendly. There is a discount for disabled people too.
    One strange exhibit is Barnes Wallis' bouncing bomb - the type of bomb that breached the dams in the Rhur in Germany in 1943. They were tested near to here but although interesting in my opinion they really belong in a museum.

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    Weymouth Clock

    by grayfo Updated Mar 14, 2007

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    Built in 1887 to mark the 50th year of Queen Victoria's reign, the clock was originally erected on a stone base on Weymouth sands and has never been moved. The paving from the promenade, which now surrounds it, was built in the 1920's.

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    The Chesil Beach

    by Britannia2 Updated Oct 21, 2006

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    View to the Chesil Beach from Portland

    The Chesil Beach is 29 km long, 200 meters wide and 18 meters high. It connects the Isle Of Portland to Abbotsbury and further west to West Bay. The beach is very steep and forms a clear storm beach that protects Weymouth and the village of Cheswell from winds and waves.
    At the Isle of Portland end the beach curves sharply to form Chesil Cove.

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    Monkey World

    by grayfo Updated Jul 2, 2011

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    Monkey World is the setting for the popular TV shows Monkey Business and Monkey Life. It is set amongst the woodland of Dorset and provides sanctuary in 65 acres of beautifully landscaped grounds, including a Woodland Walk. On the site there is also a café and indoor and outdoor play areas for children.

    The centre holds over 150 primates including over 50 chimpanzees - the largest such group outside Africa, gibbons, lemurs, macaques, squirrel monkeys, capuchin monkeys, marmosets and woolly monkeys mostly in large open enclosures with indoor and outdoor viewing areas.

    Monkey World was started in 1987 to provide abused Spanish beach chimps with a permanent, stable home and now takes in apes for rehabilitation, animals rescued from all over the world (from experimental labs, circuses, beach photographers, the pet trade).

    July and August: 10:00 am to 6:00 pm
    September to June: 10:00 am to 5:00 pm

    Adults: £10.75
    Children: £7.50

    April 2011

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    • Eco-Tourism

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    Portland Bill

    by Britannia2 Written Jul 29, 2006

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    Portland Bill light house

    There are some good walks to be made at Portland Bill around the light house and headland.
    There is a large car park and some reasonably good public toilets. There is a cafe and a pub also here.
    The light house contains a visitor centre.

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    Seeing the Sealife

    by grayfo Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Since 1983 Weymouth Sea Life Park’s mix of indoor and outdoor attractions has been a great day out, attractions include: - Otter Sanctuary, Seal Sanctuary, Penguin Sanctuary, Tropical Shark Nursery, Bay of Ray’s, National Seahorse Breeding & Conservation Centre and the Splash and Crab.

    WeymouthSeaLifePark@merlinentertainments.biz

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    • Aquarium

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    Nothe Fort

    by grayfo Updated Jul 7, 2014

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    Originally built around 1860 as a defence against a seaborne invasion that never came, the fort was constructed on three levels, which are easily accessed by stairs or lift, the Fort is filled with displays, mammoth guns and cinema areas that chart the history of this large Victorian structure. There is also a café and restaurant facility and Gift Shop that provides a range of products for all the family including books, toys, games and locally produced preserves, drinks and biscuits.

    Grade II Listed (June 1974)

    April to September
    10:30 am to 4:30 pm

    Adults: £7.00
    Children (5 to 15): £1.00
    Children (Under 5): Free

    email nothefort@uwclub.net

    June 2014

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

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    Weymouth international kite festival

    by carlrea Written Feb 7, 2005

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    As mentioned on my Weymouth Intro page Weymouth international kite festival is held every year on the 1st and 2nd of May. Worth seeing this specticle for the sheer number of kites that are on the beach. How they do not clash is beyond me. Seem to be taken very seriously by all those concerned.

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    View point near the Portland Hotel

    by Britannia2 Written Jul 29, 2006

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    The view over Portland to Weymouth

    The view is stunning from the viewpoint reached from a turn off soon after you ahve gone through the first village on Portland and close to the Portalnd Hotel.
    The photo shows the Chesil Beach and causeway to Wyke Regis to the left and the sweep of Weymouth Bay to the right.

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    Tyneham... abandoned but not forgotten

    by smirnofforiginal Written May 14, 2012

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    Christmas 1943 - the British government commandeered the tiny, peaceful village of Tyneham. They wanted to use it (together with other land along the surrounding pennisula) for strategic practice. Churchill promised the residents that as soon as the war was won they would be able to go home.

    252 people were displaced. Walking around what is left of Tyneham, today, it seems utterly impossible that there could have been as many as 252 people living here... it is so small!

    When the people of Tyneham left, somebody put a note on the door of the church. The note has become infamous for it's sentiments, especially in light of the fact that the people were never to return! It read:

    Please treat the church and houses with care; we have given up our homes where many of us lived for generations to help win the war to keep men free. We shall return one day and thank you for treating the village kindly.

    In 1948 the military put a compulsory purchase order on the land. The people were never allowed to return - although they kept up their fight.
    The Lord of Tyneham was compensated, accordingly. The people were mostly given compensation for the crops they had planted in advance.

    The military still own the land and still practice on it. As a result the land, having never been over-farmed is pretty much pristine Dorset countryside.
    Because the military still use it for military procedures/training and use live ammo, it goes without saying that mostly it is off limits to the public. However, they do open Tyneham to the public on several dates throughout the year. The dates usually coincide with school holidays. You can find an up to date list at : http://www.dorsetforyou.com/389942

    A lot of the buildings fell into disrepair - the manor house is long since gone... however, there are some building left and they have mostly been made safe.
    The church and the school house have been preserved and are now museums.

    Tyneham is an incredibly pretty place. Isolated and quiet... there is a sadness about it.

    There is a car park but you should note there are no visitor facilities - no toilets and nowhere to buy food or drink so, go prepared!

    Tyneham serves as a place frozen in time - the white telephone box, complete with posters etc... just left as it was (and now kept locked)

    the school house with the books and the children's work etc... helps to get a sense of the characters that once lived here...

    Before I went I read 'The Novel in the Viola' by Natasha Solomons. It is a work of fiction but it is set in Tyneham at the long since gone manor house. .. it helped to bring a little romance to the place!

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

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    The beach

    by grets Written Jul 24, 2004

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    Wide sandy beach, very clean, stretching the whole length of town.

    Promenade between the beach and the road - lovely for strolling any time during day or night.

    Lots to do for children on the beach with donkey rides, Punch and Judy and many other traditional British seaside pursuits.

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    • Beaches

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    Swimming in the sea

    by LINDstu Written Sep 3, 2005

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    Weymouth has a large beach area, some more pebbles than sand. But, the waves are gentle enough for even the disabled to swim in and enjoy !
    Accross the road from the beach are plenty of shops to buy beach accessories including 'jelly' shoes or
    light sandals.
    It was the first time I have swum in England feeling it was safe and clean.

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    • Family Travel
    • Beaches
    • Disabilities

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    Brewers Quay

    by Meadows11 Written Mar 23, 2005

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    Brewers Quay is an old building in Hope Square that used to be a large brewery (there's a clue in the name) and has since been rennovated in to a shopping, dining and tourist area. There are many different shops inside selling everything from linen to marbles, and candy to souvenirs.

    Part of the building is run by the Excise house pub, more information on which can be found in the nightlife section. Also part of Brewers Quay is the Discovery tour, and Timewalk.

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    • Food and Dining

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