Royal Pavilion, Brighton

4.5 out of 5 stars 58 Reviews

  • The Royal Pavilion, Brighton
    The Royal Pavilion, Brighton
    by spidermiss
  • Royal Pavilion Brighton
    Royal Pavilion Brighton
    by cleocat
  • Royal Pavilion
    by Dabs

Been here? Rate It!

hide
  • jo104's Profile Photo

    Royal Pavillion

    by jo104 Updated Aug 28, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    you may be mistaken for thinking this is the palace of a foreign king but you'd be wrong. This was the Indian style seaside home of George iv, mind you none of the bedrooms have a seaside view which must have been rather disappointing.

    The Banqueting hall is exquisite with ornate chandeliars & the painted with chinese themes on large canvasses. In the kitchen you can see many "old fashioned" instruments being the forerunner of todays modern appliances.

    In one of the sitting rooms an item of furniture caught my eye, being a stand of approx 5ft odd with a large padded circle attached to a frame - from listening to the audio guide I learnt that ladies stood in front of this so as to gaurd their wax based make up from the fire and from heating up - this is where the phrase to "Have a long face" comes from.

    I always enjoy visiting historic homes where you can see furniture & fittings from the time so the Brighton Pavillion was a treat.

    An adult ticket was GBP7.70 with a free audio guide, I suggest this is not a place for young children - the children that were unfortunately there on the day we visited were clearly bored & unruly making it unpleasent for all other visitors. Children (under 16) GBP5.10

    There are guides in some of the rooms which will answer any questions you may have.

    There is only disabled access to the ground floor levels as the first floor levels are only by staircase. Opening times 10am - 4.30pm & 9.30am- 5pm (summer) No photography is allowed so best to purchase a guide book

    Was this review helpful?

  • annase's Profile Photo

    Eccentrix mix of everything

    by annase Updated Aug 1, 2007

    The Pavilion was built in the 19th Century as a seaside retreat for the Royal family. However, it is no longer a royal residence, but is open to visitors as well as banqueting and weddings. During the World War I, it was used as a hospital for wounded Indian and West Indian servicemen. When you look at the building now, you wouldn't think that it was initially just a simple farmhouse which was then and over the years it expanded into the magnificent Indian palace that it is today. Indeed, in 1787, it was converted to a neo-classical building know as the 'Marine Pavilion' by a chap called Henry Holland. In the early 19th century, it was then transformed into the building that it is today by enlarging it and adding domes and minarets.

    Having checked the Pavilion's website after my visit, I reckon I took photos from the wrong side of the building as the other side is much more impressive! ;-) Apparently the interiors are the best bit of the pavilion, which is a shame since I only went to the bookshop!!! The style is described as something of an eccentric mix of Asian/Chinese and English style, and it looks very colourful.

    Me and an old Bentley
    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • DAO's Profile Photo

    THE ORIENTAL PAVILION

    by DAO Updated Dec 18, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    When you first come catch sight of the Royal Pavilion, you think this has to be some Raja’s Palace transported here from India. It is the most exotic architectural work in the UK. The Prince of Wales (Later King George IV) was sent to Brighton by his doctor who told him that seawater would cure his gout. He first rented a farmhouse on the site in 1786 and asked Henry Holland to extend the building. In 1803 the Indian designs first took shape that had been drawn up by William Porden. From 1815-1822 The Designer John Nash extended and built the complete Palace that you can see today in all of its glory. Visitors can easily see influences like the Taj Mahal and Islamic minarets.

    George IV was quite the Playboy and loveable Rouge. He married a Catholic (1st marriage) which was illegal. He was born in 1762 and enjoyed a life of Womanising, Gambling, Alcoholism and generally getting into debt. He also enjoyed dressing up. He became Prince Regent when his father, George III went mad. After his death he became King and did not really aspire to much. Its sad that the Official Pavilion website describes him as a Party Animal, and not much more. Well, he did this place right and it is well worth the visit. At least the outside. The Admission charges are rather high to go inside. You can go into the first room and take pictures for free.

    Opening Hours
    October to March 10.00am-5.15pm (last tickets - 4.30pm)
    April to September 9.30am-5.45pm (last tickets - 5.00pm)
    Closes early on 24 December and closed all day on 25 & 26 December

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Trains

    Was this review helpful?

  • Indian-like Architecture!!!

    by Manyana Written Aug 26, 2006

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I had a high expectation before i saw this palace just to arrive and find it a big disappointment. Among all the other indian or british palaces i've been to, from Taj Mahal in India, to Hampton Court in the UK, this one is the smallest and least real! The architecture was supposed to adopt the indian style.
    It was a farmhouse that was transformed over 35 years into the current palace. Henry Holland has gradually expanded it from a farmhouse to a building, then came John Nash who added the indan touch by his domes and minarets.
    I have not been inside the palace but the online photos show it's a piece of art. I was more interested in the outer architecture which wasn't great really. although some parts were under maintenance but i still found it pale and dull to look at somehow. the online pics look very dazzling and tempting but they're all the inner halls and rooms not the outer palace body. i also didn't like the fact that it wasn't surrounded by other buildings or it was located in the city centre. yes, brighton is a small town but i wish if this palace could stand alone, it'd be more wonderful, a palace at the seaside!

    Opening hours: everday usually from 10am to 5pm.
    Tickets: Adult, £7.50-Child, £5

    Royal Pavilion dome the entrance a view
    Related to:
    • Singles
    • Road Trip
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • USCgirlie's Profile Photo

    Opulent, extravagant palace

    by USCgirlie Written Mar 28, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Royal Pavilion, probably Brighton's most famous attraction, was home to three British monarchs. It has been decorated opulently with an Indian exterior design and a Chinese interior design. Inside, you will see beautiful furnishings, most of them original, in addition to striking colors, extravagant light fixtures, and bamboo like staircases. Admission is 6 quid (pounds), however, the palace is just as nice to look at on the outside. In the daytime, you can admire the detail of the exterior. At night, the palace is lit up and looks simply amazing. Many buses pass by the Royal Pavilion, making it easily accessible throughout Brighton.

    at its most beautiful...at nighttime the Pavilion by day
    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • aukahkay's Profile Photo

    Royal Pavillion

    by aukahkay Written Mar 27, 2006

    George IV was the oldest son of George III. He rebelled against his strict upbringing, embarking on a life of drinking, womanising and gambling that scandalised the country and got him heavily into debt. He became Prince Regent in 1811 when his father was thought to be mad, and was crowned in 1820. He died in 1830 leaving a rich art collection and an architectural legacy including Buckingham Palace, Windsor Castle and the Royal Pavilion.
    The Royal Pavillion is an ornate oriental structure resembling a Maharajah's palace. The Royal Pavilion's lavish interiors combine Chinese-style decorations with magnificent furniture and furnishings. Adorned with gilded dragons, carved palm trees and imitation bamboo staircases, the Palace's unique style mixes Asian exoticism with English eccentricity.

    Royal Pavillion Royal Pavillion
    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Dick33's Profile Photo

    Very odd

    by Dick33 Written Mar 21, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The out side of the Pavilion is what they thought a Indian palace should look like so it is a bit of a shock when the inside is oriental.
    Built by George iv but not liked by Queen Victoria it was sold to Brighton council.
    It is a very odd and unique house and well worth a look around.

    Opulance gone mad
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • Hollihocks at the Royal Pavilion Brighton

    by Mariajoy Updated Feb 16, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Architecturally magnificent, built by George IV in the 18th Century, Brighton Royal Pavilion place is an extremely popular "Must see" activity for tourists and visitors to this popular "City by the Sea" - it is just so beautiful to look at. It's £5.95 entrance for adults - but we were quite happy just to look at the outside as it was such a lovely day and there were hoardes of people queuing to get in!

    Hollihocks A nice arch Ever so slightly wonky photo

    Was this review helpful?

  • Justin_goa's Profile Photo

    Royal Pavillion

    by Justin_goa Written Jan 15, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Royal Pavilion grew over 35 years from a simple farmhouse to a spectacular palace.
    In 1787 Henry Holland extended the original farmhouse into a neo-classical building know
    From 1815-1823 John Nash used new technology to transform the Pavilion into the Indian
    style building that exists today. He enlarged the building and added the domes and
    minarets that characterise his design by superimposing a cast iron framework over
    Holland's Marine Pavilion. as the 'Marine Pavilion'.

    The Royal Pavilion's lavish interiors combine Chinese-style decorations with magnificent furniture and furnishings.
    Adorned with gilded dragons, carved palm trees and imitation bamboo staircases, the Palace's unique style mixes Asian exoticism with English eccentricity.
    Daring and inventive colours feature throughout, and there are many original items on loan from HM The Queen.
    OPENING HOURS

    October to March 10.00am-5.15pm (last tickets at 4.30pm)
    April to September 9.30am-5.45pm (last tickets at 5.00pm)
    Closed from 2.30pm on 24 December and all day on 25 & 26 December 2005

    Great architecture.. Indian influence is evident. Old design.. Yellow room Banquet room
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Designerartgirl's Profile Photo

    The Royal Pavilion, Brighton

    by Designerartgirl Updated Dec 9, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This was the summer palace of one of the kings of the past (king george ***), who decided he loved asian culture so much, he wanted to recreate it here in england. The palace is whats left. The majority of it has been left untouched so as you walk through you can see how the other half lived.

    I find that if you walk past it, or through the gardens at night it is even more spectacular, because the entire place becomes eluminated

    There is a museum right next door as well.

    If you dont want to go in, a walk through the gardens is also quite nice, especially as a short cut to the shops.

    Open everyday, except 25/26 December

    April - Sept : 9.30 - 5.45pm
    Oct - March : 10.00 - 5.15pm

    Admission fee of about ?8 is charged for adults although there is concessions for others i believe.

    Brighton Pavillion
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • Tom_Fields's Profile Photo

    The Royal Pavilion

    by Tom_Fields Written Nov 13, 2005

    The original, simple farmhouse at Brighton was expanded and embellished over the years. In 1787, Henry Holland built it into the Marine Pavilion, a neo-classical style building. Then, from 1815 to 1823, John Nash expanded it still further. He incorporated the Indian architectural elements which give it the distinctive appearance that it has now. Nash deserves credit for his originality, but the building eventually developed leaks.

    Due to this maintenance problem, and the high cost of keeping up the grounds, Queen Victoria sold it. Now, it's open to the public.

    Close-up of the Royal Pavilion Another view
    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces

    Was this review helpful?

  • BluBluBlu's Profile Photo

    India collides with China!

    by BluBluBlu Written Aug 24, 2005

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This weird building looks like a Palace from Rajasthan on the outside, but on the inside it looks like something from the Forbidden City...with a few lavish touches from a drunk interior designer! Oh well...weird taste our royal family had!

    Was this review helpful?

  • weewatty's Profile Photo

    Royal Pavilion

    by weewatty Written Aug 10, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This place caught my eye because it looks right out of place in Brighton.

    Not sure what goes on here, but it looks pretty nifty in a Taj Mahal sorta way.

    Anyway, it's worth a look, and i am sure i could going find out some bits and bobs about it but at present can't really be arsed. Feel free to discover the delights of the interior of this building and share with me, in the meantime enjoy looking at the picture i mustered up the energy to take.

    Taj Mahal, Brighton, Englandshire
    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Family Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • unexplored's Profile Photo

    Royal Pavilion

    by unexplored Written Jul 25, 2005

    An extraordinarily, lavish fantasy. It was the fanciful idea of Prince George who used to come to Brighton to hang out with his wayward uncle, the Duke of Cumberland. He fell in love with the seaside and decided Brighton was the perfect place to party.

    Was this review helpful?

  • jeffmartinartist's Profile Photo

    My dream kitchen

    by jeffmartinartist Written Jul 2, 2005

    A friend that we were staying with insisted that he take us to the Royal Brighton Pavilion to see the kitchen and this is a scan of the postcard I stuck into my book. This kitchen is fantastic and to anyone that has seen the movie ‘The cook, the thief, his wife and her lover’ is has that feel of a great working kitchen and on that scale.

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Brighton

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

18 travelers online now

Comments

Hotels Near Royal Pavilion
5.0 out of 5 stars
0.1 miles away
Show Prices
4.0 out of 5 stars
0.2 miles away
Show Prices
2.5 out of 5 stars
2 Reviews
0.2 miles away
Show Prices

View all Brighton hotels