Royal Pavilion, Brighton

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  • Hollihocks at the Royal Pavilion Brighton

    by Mariajoy Updated Feb 16, 2006

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    Architecturally magnificent, built by George IV in the 18th Century, Brighton Royal Pavilion place is an extremely popular "Must see" activity for tourists and visitors to this popular "City by the Sea" - it is just so beautiful to look at. It's £5.95 entrance for adults - but we were quite happy just to look at the outside as it was such a lovely day and there were hoardes of people queuing to get in!

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    Visit the Royal Pavillion and Gardens.

    by amapola66 Updated Feb 2, 2008

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    Royal Pavillion - Spring 2007
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    A must for history lovers, the total splendour of the palace is rather awe inspiring and although I have lived here a few years now, it still gets my attention when it is lit up at night.

    Visit the website to see details of the rooms (link below).

    I like to hang out in the gardens reading a book with a drink and a 'sarnie' in the summer months, very relaxed and surrounded by well kept exotic plants and a cafe that sometimes holds concerts.

    Many people have been holding their weddings there recently, and don't blame them, a great venue. Pictured, the Pavillion and gardens during the Brighton Festival May 2005.

    You have to pay to get into the house, but the gardens and museum (which features one of Salvador Dali's Lips sofas among other things) are free.

    Also listed below, is a link to Brighton & Hove's museums.

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    India collides with China!

    by BluBluBlu Written Aug 24, 2005

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    This weird building looks like a Palace from Rajasthan on the outside, but on the inside it looks like something from the Forbidden City...with a few lavish touches from a drunk interior designer! Oh well...weird taste our royal family had!

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    The Royal Pavilion.

    by a5floor Updated Nov 9, 2003

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    The Royal Pavilion was build for Prince George IV (also know as Prince Regent). This magnificent building was decorated in the Chinese style.
    The story about the Royal Pavilion is next:
    The Royal Pavilion began life as little more than a 'modest farmhouse' which George, Prince of Wales, rented when he first began visiting Brighton in 1783. He enjoyed the informal atmosphere of the town and in 1787 he asked Henry Holland to create a classically styled villa on the iste, known as the Marine Pavilion. From 1802 the interiors were decorated in the Chinese taste.
    In 1811 George became Prince Regent and soon after this, between 1815-1822, John Nash enlarged the villa and transformed it into the present Pavilion, the exterior inspired by Indian architecture.
    George IV was king from 1820-1830. His brother William IV (1830-37)shared George's fondness for the town, but their nice, Queen Victoria (1837-1901), felt Brighton to be 'far too crowded' and sold the Pavilion to Brighton in 1850, having first stripped it of all its fittings and furniture.
    Since then original furniture and decorations have been returned and rstored. Exhibits include items on permanent loan from H.M. The Queen.
    An extensive structural and interior restoration programme was completed in the 1990s.

    The price for an adult to get in, is GBP5.80 (on 22 August 2003).

    Open 10am - 6pm daily June - Sept, 10am - 5pm daily Oct - May.

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    THE ROYAL PAVILION

    by balhannah Updated Nov 21, 2013

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    Royal Pavilion
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    A visit to the Royal Pavilion should not be missed if you are at Brighton.

    First, I think we nearly walked the whole way around the Pavilion to find the entry point, some how, we must have missed the sign pointing to the entrance. It was all good though, because we saw all sides of the Pavilion. The outside was impressive, so what would the inside be?

    This Pavilion was built for the Prince Regent, later King George IV, between 1787 and 1823.
    The Royal Pavilion is home to some of the finest collections and examples of the chinoiserie style in Britain.
    Looking forward to seeing all this, we headed inside only to be disappointed to find........
    NO PHOTO'S ALLOWED

    In the book I bought, it says that the entry is "low key," and gradually builds up, this is true, but in my eyes, that haven't seen much like this before, it was incredible right from the very start.

    The entry Hall where I walked is where King George IV and his important guest's would have walked many times before me.

    Room's I went through were the Long Gallery, filled with imitation and real Bamboo decoration's, this would have been a room for entertainment.
    The Banqueting room, fit for a King in all ways! The Chandelier grabbed my attention, one word "huge!"
    I saw the "Great Kitchen," the "Banqueting Room," and the "Saloon," which is one of the oldest areas in the Pavillion.
    The Music room gallery and the Music Room itself were where the King enjoyed his passion for music.
    The Yellow bow room's, were the Bedroom's of George IV's brothers and the Dukes of York and Clarence.
    Lastly, the King's & Queen's Apartment's, and I finished the tour.

    It was an incredible sight for me! I just couldn't believe the opulence/extravagance in this Pavilion, not something I could live with, but very nice to see once in my lifetime!

    Exit, as usual, was through the gift shop which was more than busy.

    ADMISSION CHARGES......until 1st April 2014
    Adult £10.50
    Child (5-15) £5.90
    2 adults with up to 2 children £26.90
    1 adult with up to 2 children £16.40
    Concessions (ID required) Seniors (60 or over)- Students - Unemployed - Disabled £8.50
    We entered with our British Heritage Pass which was Free Entry for us.

    OPEN......Open daily
    October to March 10am–5.15pm (last tickets at 4.30pm)
    April to September 9.30am–5.45pm (last tickets at 5pm)

    Closed 24 December (from 2.30pm) and all day on 25 and 26 December
    Closed 23 January to 3 February 2012 for essential maintenance

    July & August are the busiest months, especially on the weekend's.

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  • spidermiss's Profile Photo

    The Royal Pavilion

    by spidermiss Updated Sep 5, 2010

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    The Royal Pavilion, Brighton
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    The Royal Pavilion is an exotic building that was built as a home in for King George IV for when he was in Brighton. Brighton was the place to be during the fashionable Regency society. King William IV and Queen Victoria also used in Pavilion.

    Visitors can visit The Pavilion and it has been restored to how they were when they were first built in 1823 with its Indian exterior and Chinese interior designs. Visitors can take an audio guided tour around The State Rooms including the Banqueting Room and The Music Room; The Royal Bedrooms where King George spent his last days; and other rooms such as the Great Kitchen and the servants' corridors.

    There are a number of events that are held at The Pavilion throughout the year and you can enjoy having refreshments in the Royal Pavilion Tearoom.

    It's also worth exploring the Romantic Regency gardens and the former stable block (now Brighton Museum & Art Gallery).

    It cost me 9.50 GBP (August 2010)

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  • Justin_goa's Profile Photo

    Royal Pavillion

    by Justin_goa Written Jan 15, 2006

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    Great architecture.. Indian influence is evident.
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    The Royal Pavilion grew over 35 years from a simple farmhouse to a spectacular palace.
    In 1787 Henry Holland extended the original farmhouse into a neo-classical building know
    From 1815-1823 John Nash used new technology to transform the Pavilion into the Indian
    style building that exists today. He enlarged the building and added the domes and
    minarets that characterise his design by superimposing a cast iron framework over
    Holland's Marine Pavilion. as the 'Marine Pavilion'.

    The Royal Pavilion's lavish interiors combine Chinese-style decorations with magnificent furniture and furnishings.
    Adorned with gilded dragons, carved palm trees and imitation bamboo staircases, the Palace's unique style mixes Asian exoticism with English eccentricity.
    Daring and inventive colours feature throughout, and there are many original items on loan from HM The Queen.
    OPENING HOURS

    October to March 10.00am-5.15pm (last tickets at 4.30pm)
    April to September 9.30am-5.45pm (last tickets at 5.00pm)
    Closed from 2.30pm on 24 December and all day on 25 & 26 December 2005

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    Royal Pavillion

    by jo104 Updated Aug 28, 2007

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    you may be mistaken for thinking this is the palace of a foreign king but you'd be wrong. This was the Indian style seaside home of George iv, mind you none of the bedrooms have a seaside view which must have been rather disappointing.

    The Banqueting hall is exquisite with ornate chandeliars & the painted with chinese themes on large canvasses. In the kitchen you can see many "old fashioned" instruments being the forerunner of todays modern appliances.

    In one of the sitting rooms an item of furniture caught my eye, being a stand of approx 5ft odd with a large padded circle attached to a frame - from listening to the audio guide I learnt that ladies stood in front of this so as to gaurd their wax based make up from the fire and from heating up - this is where the phrase to "Have a long face" comes from.

    I always enjoy visiting historic homes where you can see furniture & fittings from the time so the Brighton Pavillion was a treat.

    An adult ticket was GBP7.70 with a free audio guide, I suggest this is not a place for young children - the children that were unfortunately there on the day we visited were clearly bored & unruly making it unpleasent for all other visitors. Children (under 16) GBP5.10

    There are guides in some of the rooms which will answer any questions you may have.

    There is only disabled access to the ground floor levels as the first floor levels are only by staircase. Opening times 10am - 4.30pm & 9.30am- 5pm (summer) No photography is allowed so best to purchase a guide book

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    ORIENTAL SPLENDOUR BY THE BRITISH SEASIDE!

    by themajor Updated Jul 15, 2008

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    Turrets Syndrome

    There aren't many people who can claim to have a royal palace on their doorstep but the residents of Brighton and Hove can do just that. But curiously even something as outrageously splendid and madly misplaced as the Royal Pavilion can be overlooked by those who are most familiar with it. Having walked through it, past it and around it for decades - yes, I am that old a resident! - you tend to take it's beauty and existence for granted. Rather along the lines of..."I know this really great place for coffee. Oh, that? Um, it's only the Royal Pavilion. Let's get some cake!" But then there are days when the sunlight catches it just so, or when it's illuminated at night and you simply beam with pride.

    Built between 1815 and 1822 as a seaside residence for the rakish Prince Regent (who eventually became King George IV) it's Indian and Chinese influences are apparent throughout. if you want interior design sensory overload then some of the rooms here are an excellent place to start. Queen Victoria did actually sleep here but in keeping with her Victorian values she didn't care for the place and was happy to sell it to local councillors who bought it for the town for the princely sum of £53000 in 1850. Needless to say, £53000 will get you considerably less than a palace in today's Brighton!

    I suppose I could get a quick plug in here and tell you that I once filmed a short piece on the Royal Pavilion for BBC Television...but perhaps not. No, suffice to say that you simply can't visit the town without taking a peek at the Pavilion. The internal decorations are quite as dazzling as the exterior - if you want to see a dragon holding a chandelier than I respectfully suggest that you need go no further.

    Adult entry £8.50
    Open Daily
    October to March 10.00am-5.15pm (last tickets at 4.30pm)
    April to September 9.30am-5.45pm (last tickets at 5.00pm)
    Closed from 2.30pm on 24 December and all day on 25 & 26 December

    *** The Royal Pavilion will be closed on Wednesday 16 and Thursday 17 July 2008 due to a national strike ***

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  • nigelw6443's Profile Photo

    The Royal Pavillion

    by nigelw6443 Written Sep 23, 2003

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    The Royal Pavillion

    The Pavillion is probably Brightons most famous landmark and well worth a visit.

    In 1783 the Prince regent had a house built in Brighton and later had John Nash remodel his mansion into the extravagant Brighton Pavilion (more properly titled "The Royal Pavilion"), an oriental pleasure palace with domes and turrets. The interior of the Pavilion is as incredibly opulent as the exterior.

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  • Brighton Royal Pavillion

    by julia79 Written Jan 7, 2009

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    Brighton Royal Pavillion
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    Great architecture!
    It is a royal residence built in 19th century.

    Opening Hours:
    Open Daily
    October to March 10.00am-5.15pm (last tickets at 4.30pm)
    April to September 9.30am-5.45pm (last tickets at 5.00pm)
    Closed from 2.30pm on 24 December and all day on 25 & 26 December
    PLEASE NOTE: THE ROYAL PAVILION WILL CLOSE 19-30 JANUARY 2009 FOR ESSENTIAL MAINTENANCE

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    A rather grand beach hut

    by sourbugger Written Oct 8, 2007

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    The pavilion (from Freefoto.com)

    In an episode of Blackadder the Third, (see separate tip for relevance), Edmund asks the Prince regents to “Take out the drawings of that beach hut in Brighton”. The Prince regent is, of course, George IV who built this amazing pleasure dome in Brighton.

    More Disneyesque than Pluto’s jockstrap it is Brighton’s No1 tourist draw. Built by John Nash at the beginning of the 19th century is served as the playground for the young prince. Here, all kinds of excesses would have taken place. In the best traditions of Las Vegas, what happened in Brighton – stayed in Brighton.

    Built in an Englishman’s idea of the ‘Indian style’ with domed turrets and colonnades, the form Royal palace (now the property of the local Council) is so over the top in it’s decoration that it defies all sense. Or taste.

    The palm tree designs abound, and of special note in the kitchen. Unusually these were not hidden the subterranean depths, but right next to the dining room and fitted out to the very highest standards of the day. The Prince made sure that visitors were as impressed by them as much as the entertaining rooms.

    Other rooms have a Chinese motif, a style that was then copied in virtually every stately home in the land. The place is covered in dragons, much to the delight of my 2-year old who spend the whole time shouting “Dragon” and “Fire” at the top of his voice. The latter caused a few attendants to panic somewhat.

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    THE ORIENTAL PAVILION

    by DAO Updated Dec 18, 2006

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    When you first come catch sight of the Royal Pavilion, you think this has to be some Raja’s Palace transported here from India. It is the most exotic architectural work in the UK. The Prince of Wales (Later King George IV) was sent to Brighton by his doctor who told him that seawater would cure his gout. He first rented a farmhouse on the site in 1786 and asked Henry Holland to extend the building. In 1803 the Indian designs first took shape that had been drawn up by William Porden. From 1815-1822 The Designer John Nash extended and built the complete Palace that you can see today in all of its glory. Visitors can easily see influences like the Taj Mahal and Islamic minarets.

    George IV was quite the Playboy and loveable Rouge. He married a Catholic (1st marriage) which was illegal. He was born in 1762 and enjoyed a life of Womanising, Gambling, Alcoholism and generally getting into debt. He also enjoyed dressing up. He became Prince Regent when his father, George III went mad. After his death he became King and did not really aspire to much. Its sad that the Official Pavilion website describes him as a Party Animal, and not much more. Well, he did this place right and it is well worth the visit. At least the outside. The Admission charges are rather high to go inside. You can go into the first room and take pictures for free.

    Opening Hours
    October to March 10.00am-5.15pm (last tickets - 4.30pm)
    April to September 9.30am-5.45pm (last tickets - 5.00pm)
    Closes early on 24 December and closed all day on 25 & 26 December

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  • Elodie_Caroline's Profile Photo

    The Royal Pavilion - From Cabbages to Kings!

    by Elodie_Caroline Updated Sep 16, 2007

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    Brighton Palace Pavilion front
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    Brighton was originally called Brighthelmstone and was a small fishing town until the mid 18th century. The 'society' people of London started using the town after the therapeutic findings of Dr Richard Russell, who was using the sea water externally and internally, sometimes heated with milk, sometimes not, as treatment.

    George IV started coming here with his uncle, The Duke of Cumberland, to play cards, live the high life, and escape his debts. George rented a house from Thomas Kemp, a farmhouse on the Stiene, and eventually retired here, living with the mistress he had secretly and illegally married. He then enlisted the help of Henry Holland to design the first vestiges of The Pavilion. The work commenced in 1815, by then Prince George was the Prince Regent.

    The Pavilion started out with a central domed rotunda,surrounded by Ionic columns. The architect that done the actual work was called John Nash, who had earlier worked for the prince regent on a house in London.

    By the mid 19th century, the people of Brighton has realised the worth of the Pavilion, so they bought the Pavilion off of Queen Victoria in the 1840s.

    You must go and see this magnificent place! and don't believe anyone that says it's not impressive, it's beautiful!

    So, from farmhouse to palace; now you know why I used the title of cabbages and kings.

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  • socrates_07's Profile Photo

    The Royal Pavilion

    by socrates_07 Written Jan 5, 2005

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    The Royal Pavilion

    When I arrived in Brighton, one of the first sight I saw was the Royal Pavilion. I have to admit, I didnt inform myself about this city so I had no idea about that builing. When I saw it I thought I must be in the wrong city. Ok, it was my first time in England but that kind of builinds were the last I expected.

    It took till the last day to visit the Royal Pavilion. Its a very interesting museum which George, Prince of Wales rented when he first visited Brighton in 1783.

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