Eastbourne Things to Do

  • No cabbages please!
    No cabbages please!
    by Mariajoy
  • Redoubt Fortress and Military Museum
    Redoubt Fortress and Military Museum
    by zadunajska8
  • Redoubt Fortress and Military Museum
    Redoubt Fortress and Military Museum
    by zadunajska8

Most Recent Things to Do in Eastbourne

  • Cliffs and Hang-glider

    by Mariajoy Updated Dec 21, 2006

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    There were so many of these guys, of all nationalities, just floating around the cliffs! What a fabulous way to spend a bright and sunny Sunday morning.

    If you are interested in trying hang gliding or paragliding for yourself, check the website!

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  • Beachy Head - The Cliffs

    by Mariajoy Updated Dec 21, 2006

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    Chalk Cliffs at Eastbourne

    The cliffs here are so precarious! Liable to crumble into the sea at any moment, the hapless walker/tourist may inadvertently go over the edge on occasion. The Coastguards have erected warning signs but still accidents happen. Don't be tempted to get too close to the edge. Even so... if you are in the area this is a place you should visit, the most beautiful, scenic and at 530 ft, highest chalk cliffs in Britain.

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  • To the Lighthouse

    by Mariajoy Updated Dec 21, 2006

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    Beachy Head Lighthouse

    Beachy Head Lighthouse. A well known land (sea?) mark of the Sussex coastline.

    Lanternroom.com

    This has more information than anyone could possibly need (or at least more than I am able to give :))

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  • Airborne over Eastbourne

    by Mariajoy Updated Aug 17, 2006

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    Every year in August, there is a three day air show in Eastbourne, "Airbourne" when thousands flock to the beach to see fab aeronautical displays by all kinds of aircraft, from the old Spitfires to the Red Devils. On the last evening there is a big fireworks display too. The show is free and is the largest of its kind in SE England. It can be seen from all along the coast and up on Beachy Head. Some of the planes can be heard in neighbouring towns too - so if you are coming to Eastbourne with young children you might want to bring earplugs or headphones for them as the noise was deafening at times!!

    It's great fun and there are loads of stalls selling refreshments, drinks, icecream, hotdogs, candyfloss etc as well as plenty of things to interest the aircraft enthusiast, including flight simulators!. There was an excellent running commentary giving enormous descriptive detail about the aircraft, pilots and the acrobatics they were performing - some of it real show stopping stuff! The viewers had no time to get bored as the planes came and went in very quick succession with only a few minutes wait between changes.

    Wish I had a zoom lens!!!

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    Eastbourne Pier

    by Elodie_Caroline Written May 9, 2006

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    The Pier in Eastbourne is much prettier than the Pier at Brighton, especially in the dark. When you drive past there at night time, all you ever see going on and off there is very young people, as there is a nightclub on there, so that's not surprising is it. At daytime it is families and old people, so I guess there is something for everyone on there, which is nice.

    Here is a great website about one of the attractions on the pier:
    SolarObscura

    You can tell when it's getting near to Winter though, as half of the lights are dead and gone, it looks kind of jaded then, but you just know that the lights will be sorted out for the Summer months when Eastbourne is in it's splendour!

    Whenever you drive though Eastbourne during the Summer, there is always something going on, different kinds of fairs, air shows with big noisey Jets and lots of other stuff too, Chris and I have quite often commented about coming down here to live.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

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    Beachy Head

    by iandsmith Updated Dec 1, 2005

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    Reiniscent of Dover
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    When I first saw a picture of it, I was transfixed. A lighthouse in the middle of the sea, perched on a minimal rocky outcrop, beneath dramatic white cliffs. Thus it was I arrived at Beachy Head, a misnomer if ever there was one.
    The sheer white chalk cliffs, so reminiscent of the more famous ones at Dover, provide a stunning frame for the barber's pole beneath them. Just walking along the cliff tops is such an enjoyable thing to do and then they throw in the lighthouse as well. The fact that you have to pay to park there irked me much but, since Rosemarie wasn't feeling well, I left her in the car and went off on my own, thus saving what I believe to be a blatant ripoff, common along the coastline in this area of England.
    There's a restaurant to sate the many tourists who understandably flock here and, either side at some distance, there are other car parks, one of them free, but you'd spend almost half a day getting back again.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • National/State Park
    • Beaches

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    A place to stay

    by iandsmith Updated Dec 1, 2005

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    Premium accommodation.

    Along the beachfront, just behind the dunes, this scene is played out over and over. Accommodation and residences vie for space next to the beach. As we were there in off peak times there weren't a lot of people about but it doesn't take much imagination to figure out what it would be like in high summer where getting into one of these would be at a premium.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Beaches

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    Now you see it, now you don't

    by iandsmith Written Nov 18, 2005

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    Fascinating history

    This seemingly nondescript lighthouse nearby to the more dramatic one has, in point of fact, a history as eye-popping as the other is scenic.
    This is the Belle Tout Lighthouse but all is not as it seems. It used to be elsewhere, 55ft elsewhere, as in closer to the edge but, in 1999, in a remarkable feat of engineering it was moved to its present location.
    The reason? Well, those cliffs, the highest of their type in Britain at 530ft, are not as stable as they first appear. Think chalk, think what water does to chalk. You get the picture.
    Anyhow, this became a private residence after Beachy was built but then became a derelict ruin after the Second World War before it was eventually restored and moved.
    You may have wondered why they would have built another one when the original was working perfectly. Well, it has a whole lot to do with actually seeing Belle Tout. Remember that thing that England is famous for. Fogs. At over 170 metres up you couldn't see the thing. Enter Beachy Head Lighthouse.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Architecture

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    On the waterfront

    by iandsmith Written Nov 18, 2005

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    The esplanade stretches as far as the eye can see and, in summer, would be liberally sprinkled with tourists.
    This day, midst the portending gloom and its omens of rain, there were few to mar the facade.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Beaches
    • Family Travel

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    The pier continued

    by iandsmith Written Nov 18, 2005

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    Either side of the Great War saw the shoreward end of the pier remodelled with a new entrance building being added in 1912 and the 'blue room' a 900-seater pavilion in 1922. This pavilion was predominantly used as a ballroom before playing host to the now modern favourite leisure facility of seaside piers, an amusement arcade.
    "During the Second World War the wooden decking was removed and machine gun platforms were installed in the theatre providing a useful vantagepoint from where to repel any attempted enemy landings. In 1951, now back in peacetime, the entrance buildings were again replaced. The theatre was destroyed by fire in January 1970, a new Atlantis nightclub and bar being built in its place. Entrance buildings were again replaced in 1991. In 2003 the Camera Obscura, located in the dome above the 'Atlantis' nightclub, was reopened to the public. Restoration of this Victorian projector has provided Eastbourne Pier with a unique visitor attraction.
    This is a charming pier, which although modernised many times still retains much of its Edwardian splendour. The gift shops, sweet shops, bars and restaurants still make it a very pleasurable place to wander on a pleasant summer afternoon, and at night the splendid illuminations cannot fail to impress the visitor."
    Having seen it myself, I can only concur.

    Related to:
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    • Family Travel
    • Theme Park Trips

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    The pier

    by iandsmith Updated Nov 18, 2005

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    That thing in the ocean

    What is an English seaside resort without its pier? Unworthy, that's what. Yes, to get a name for yourself you have to have that ubiquitous thing sticking out in the ocean. Eastbourne's, in line with everything else in this town, had a squeaky clean appearance that bespoke of civic pride.
    For the following information I am indebted to the "Heritage Trail". I found some of the information fascinating, I hope you do too.
    "The first pile for Eastbourne Pier was driven into the seabed on 18th April 1866. Officially opened by Lord Edward Cavendish on 13th June 1870, the pier was not actually completed for a further two years. Designed by Eugenius Birch, the piles that supported the superstructure sat upon specially made cups, similar to those used on furniture to protect carpets from deep furrowing, that rested on the rock bed. This ingenious arrangement allowed the pier structure to 'move' in bad weather. Using two six-pound cannons, to test whether the superstructure could withstand such a force, proved almost insignificant compared with the adverse weather conditions experienced on this stretch of coastline over the last 128 years. The relatively unscathed Eastbourne Pier is testimony in itself to the substantial core of the construction.
    At 1000ft (303m) long, this pier in common with most of that era was built purely as a promenade, with six small kiosks along its length, and a pair of tollbooths at the entrance. The shoreward end was washed away in a violent storm on New Years Day 1877 and was subsequently rebuilt at a much higher level. The domed 400-seater pavilion was constructed at a cost of £250 at the seaward end in 1888. A 1000-seater theatre, bar, camera obscura and office suite replaced this in 1899/1901. At the same time two saloons were built midway along the pier." Continued -

    Related to:
    • Theme Park Trips
    • Family Travel
    • Beaches

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    Rocky shores

    by iandsmith Written Nov 18, 2005

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    A place to walk, a place to swim, a place to ponde

    This is then, the aforementioned beach, so called. Though sand is my go, it does make for a different experience to crunch on the pebbles and see posts sticking up in the middle of the beach.
    The local sailing club can be noted in the background but I must admit I was ever so curious to know what happened when storms arrived with all those craft left exposed to the elements.

    Related to:
    • Beaches
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Family Travel

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    Sea shore romantic place - The Pier

    by Xdrive Written Oct 19, 2005

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    Eastbourne pier

    This is a charming pier, which although modernised many times still retains much of its Edwardian splendour. The gift shops, sweet shops, bars and restaurants still make it a very pleasurable place to wander on a pleasant summer afternoon, and at night the splendid illuminations cannot fail to impress the visitor.

    The first pile for Eastbourne Pier was driven into the seabed on 18th April 1866. Officially opened by Lord Edward Cavendish on 13th June 1870, the pier was not actually completed for a further two years. Designed by Eugenius Birch, the piles that supported the superstructure sat upon specially made cups, similar to those used on furniture to protect carpets from deep furrowing, that rested on the rock bed. This ingenious arrangement allowed the pier structure to 'move' in bad weather. Using two six-pound cannons, to test whether the superstructure could withstand such a force, proved almost insignificant compared with the adverse weather conditions experienced on this stretch of coastline over the last 128 years. The relatively unscathed Eastbourne Pier is testimony in itself to the substantial core of the construction.

    At 1000ft (303m) long, this pier in common with most of that era was built purely as a promenade, with six small kiosks along its length, and a pair of tollbooths at the entrance. The shoreward end was washed away in a violent storm on New Years Day 1877 and was subsequently rebuilt at a much higher level. The domed 400-seater pavilion was constructed at a cost of £250 at the seaward end in 1888. A 1000-seater theatre, bar, camera obscura and office suite replaced this in 1899/1901.

    During the Second World War the wooden decking was removed and machine gun platforms were installed in the theatre providing a useful vantagepoint from where to repel any attempted enemy landings. In 1951, now back in peacetime, the entrance buildings were again replaced.

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    Royal Lifeboat Instute Museum

    by daryll Written Jul 10, 2005

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    The Lifeboat Museum

    More on history of Lifeboat savers before, during and after the World War. Described alot of strongman those days which has contribute alot on the national services.

    The museum has a fairly large collection of navigation and lifeboats equipment which used during that time.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Seniors

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    Charity Motorcycle Rally

    by Kettleman Written Jun 5, 2005
    Velocette and GPO BSA Bantam

    Eastbourne Lions Club organinse a motorcycle gathering one day in June, this year (2005) it was Sunday the 5th.

    Excellent fun and ride around the countryside. It was my first this year and I'll definitely have a go again next year if I am free on the right day.

    I was entrant F34 in the modern (post 1990) bikes and there wwre loads from a bygone age... the oldest being a 1915 Douglas.

    Related to:
    • Motorcycle

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