Frinton-on-Sea Off The Beaten Path

  • 1902 Frinton Wireless school
    1902 Frinton Wireless school
    by PeterVancouver
  • Memorial at Frinton for Bill Bishop
    Memorial at Frinton for Bill Bishop
    by PeterVancouver

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Frinton-on-Sea

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    Pedlars Wood...

    by arturowan Updated Dec 19, 2013

    Frinton might not be the sort of place to go for the sake of a walk in the woods, but if such a desire should inspire you, the only place to go is Pedlars wood...
    The wood is not a public place, but actually owned by a local resident, who's responsible for transforming it from an overgrown rubbish tip on wasteland, that became redundant with the failure of the Frinton Court Park, modernist housing estate (see separate tip...)
    Pedlars Wood is now a conservation area, either side of Central Avenue, between the main road into Walton, & the parallel railway line...
    Public admission is permitted by the owner into the area on the right side of the humpback bridge, where there is a path & benches, an ornately carved 1 of which, was stolen in June 2013
    Pam Garrad, the site's legal owner & custodian, has now written a history of Pedlars Wood, & published it to raise funds for the conservation work there to continue...
    The entire woodland area is 7 acres, & the mature trees provide home to both green, & greater spotted woodpeckers, & a rookery...
    In late April, Pedlars Wood is carpeted with bluebells & other spring flowers, & to date has won 3 awards for conservation...

    Related to:
    • Birdwatching
    • Beaches
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Holland Haven...

    by arturowan Updated Jul 31, 2013

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    Holland Haven is a nature reserve, tucked away behind the sea wall, linking Holland-0n-Sea to Frinton-0n-Sea...
    This area is not above sea level, & would have been lost to coastal erosion, were it not for the continuing sea defences construction on this part of the Tendring Penninsula...
    The nature reserve is a part of Holland Marshes, which flood rapidly during times of heavy rainfall, & there is a permanent brackish pond, surrounded by dykes, so gumboots might be required if visiting the reserve in wet weather...
    Because water levels are maintained artificially high on site, Holland Haven has become a breeding ground for aquatic insects, especially damselflies, & some rare beetles, while special efforts are being made to encourage the rare Fisher's Estaurine moth, by growing Hogs Fennel & long coarse water grasses...
    Some areas of the reserve are grazed by cattle, & there's a sheep pen near the wooden bird hide, where can be seen on the border of the reserve & the local farm, large boxes for nesting owls...
    (A barn owl could be seen everyday on the site, early in 2013, but as a result of the wintery March & April, has not been seen since...)
    The main interest to visitors are the many types of birds to be seen in the area, which vary depending on the time of year, but as well as the estuarine & marine migrant visitors, there are skylarks, owls, raptors, & flocks of lapwings, either at home here, or using it as a 'pit stop' during migration...
    The serious bird observer has a choice of 2 hides on site - a metal container that requires climbing a ladder, in order to view across the marshes, or a wooden hut that faces onto a dyke of reeds & clubrush, with a view towards Frinton golf course...
    Both hides are open to the public, so do not be put off by a few 'anorak' types on site, who think these facilities are for their own personal recreation...
    These are the 'trainspotters' of birdwatching, known as 'twitchers'...
    & do not take fright if you see these very serious about their 'twitching', characters on site, because they tend to wear camo-clothes from head to toe, so appear like terrorists lurking in the undergrowth, with their tripods & over-sized binoculars & zoom lenses...
    Scary-looking, but harmless, I suppose...

    Related to:
    • Golf
    • Beaches
    • Birdwatching

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    Memorial for PC 389 Bill Bishop

    by PeterVancouver Updated Feb 5, 2012

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    Memorial at Frinton for Bill Bishop

    On Wednesday August 22nd 1984, with other officers, Bill Bishop confronted a man recognised as a person wanted for armed hold ups that day in both Walton and Frinton Post Offices.

    He shouted at him `Armed Police. Stop!' at which the robber lifted the carrier bag, which concealed a gun, and shot him in the head. Police Sergeant Mervyn Fairweather was shot in the groin. Another colleague then fired at the gunman, hitting him in the back and side. Bill Bishop died five days later in Saint Bartholomew's Hospital in London. A thirty five year-old Brentwood man was arrested at the scene but, because of injuries he had sustained, he was detained under guard in Colchester hospital and later charged with murder.

    On Friday 19th July 1985 he appeared at Norwich Crown Court, sitting in a wheelchair as he was paralysed from the waist down. He was charged with Bill Bishop's murder and the attempted murder of Police Sergeant Fairweather. He denied both charges. The jury found him guilty of Bill Bishop's murder. They found him not guilty of attempting to murder Police Sergeant Fairweather, but guilty of wounding him. He was sentenced to life imprisonment and the judge commented that he would have recommended a minimum of twenty years in gaol had his injuries not reduced his danger to society. Mr. Justice Boreham also praised the bravery of the officers who had been with Bill Bishop when confronted by the robber and went on to say `I only wish Bill Bishop was here to hear the commendation'.

    On Wednesday 19th February 1986, the then Home Secretary, Douglas Hurd unveiled a brown granite memorial stone on Frinton Greensward, adjacent to the seafront site where Bill Bishop fell.

    Gerry Sandford was my Grandfather and was Postmaster of the Frinton PO for eleven years from March 1953

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Road Trip

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    Frinton - Worlds 1st telegraph School

    by PeterVancouver Updated Aug 31, 2005
    1902 Frinton Wireless school

    Frinton can justly claim a world 'first' with its Wireless Telegraph School established there in 1901 with the opening of a residential school for training probationary engineers for Marconi's International Marine Communication Co.

    The school occupied one building; the adjacent house was the residence for the school's students, with a 120 ft. sectioned wooden mast standing between the two. The majority of the students' time at Frinton would have been concerned with the use, maintenance and repair of the transmitting and receiving equipment. It is thought that the station's local test transmissions were usually to a small (possibly portable) station located somewhere in Pole Barn Lane, some 500 yards away.

    However, the school's large mast would have enabled the students to work easily with the main Marconi site in Hall Street, Chelmsford and with coastal stations at Dovercourt and North Foreland. Just why Marconi came to Frinton is unclear, although a brief look at any map of this stretch of coast shows it to be readily accessible, with clear sea paths to North Foreland and the Kent coast.
    The School at Frinton was closed in 1904 and the work was transferred to the Hall Street Works in Chelmsford. The mast was dismantled the same year, but the large concrete base was not removed until the 1940's and pieces of the extensive buried earth mat of stranded wires are still being found in the garden today.
    The building has not changed much, apart from the loss of a chimney and some mock Tudor cladding. The addition of more houses both behind and in front has reduced the size of the original site somewhat, and the garage and television aerial are part of the new age. The Wireless School was surprisingly not situated on the sea front, but some half-a-mile inland on Upper Third Avenue, which remains to this day as a quiet private residence, aptly named, Marconia.
    A plaque was subsequently affixed to the house to commemorate its historical significance.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

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Frinton-on-Sea Off The Beaten Path

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