Greenwich Favorites

  • Canary Wharf from Greenwich
    Canary Wharf from Greenwich
    by toonsarah
  • View from the hill
    View from the hill
    by toonsarah
  • The Shard from Greenwich
    The Shard from Greenwich
    by toonsarah

Most Recent Favorites in Greenwich

  • pieter_jan_v's Profile Photo

    WHERE TO GO AT GREENWICH?

    by pieter_jan_v Written Dec 1, 2014

    Favorite thing: The Discover Greenwich Visitor Centre is located in one of the buildings of the Old Navy College at:

    Pepys House, 2 Cutty Sark Gardens - Greenwich, London, SE10 9LW.
    Open: Daily: 10AM - 5PM.

    Where to go at Greenwich? Greenwich attractions
    Related to:
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    • Architecture
    • Photography

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  • toonsarah's Profile Photo

    Enjoy the views

    by toonsarah Updated Aug 11, 2014

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    Favorite thing: As well as enjoying all that the Observatory has to offer, a climb up the hill in Greenwich Park is rewarded with some wonderful views as you can see. The elegant buildings of the Old Naval College, the Queen’s House and the Maritime Museum lie at the foot of the hill. The Thames flows beyond, with lots of river traffic coming and going. And on the far bank rise the dramatic skyscrapers of London’s Docklands. Further to your left (the west) you can see some of the buildings of the City, the new Shard and even the London Eye. And even if you can’t manage the hill, there are still good views to be had along the river bank, as my second and third photos show.

    To make the most of the views you might want to bring a picnic to enjoy in the park, or buy supplies in Greenwich (there is a branch of Marks and Spencer’s Simply Food near the market).

    View from the hill The Shard from Greenwich Canary Wharf from Greenwich

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  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    The first marine chronometer

    by kris-t Updated Apr 15, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: 'In 1730 John Harrison, a self-educated English clockmaker, created a description and drawings for a proposed marine clock to compete for the Longitude Prize.
    It took Harrison five years to build Harrison Number One or H1.
    In 1741, after three years of building and two of on-land testing, H2 was ready.

    Harrison spent seventeen years working on this third 'sea clock'. Certainly in this machine he left the world two enduring legacies — the bimetallic strip and the caged roller bearing.

    Later he proceeded to design and make the world's first successful marine timekeeper that for the first time, allowed a navigator to accurately assess his ship's position in longitude. H4 took six years to construct.'

    Fondest memory: John Harrison (24 Mar.1693 – 24 Mar. 1776) came 39th in the BBC's 2002 public poll of the 100 Greatest Britons.

    Today the restored H1, H2, H3 and H4 can be seen on display in the National Maritime Museum at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich. H1, 2 and 3 are still running; H4 is kept in a stopped state.

    Also you can find a big variety of Harrison related souvenirs in museum on-line shop.

    P.S. There is a great historical drama 'Longitude' with Jonathan Coy, Christopher Hodsol and Jeremy Irons. We wish we saw this movie before visiting Greenwich.

    Related to:
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    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

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  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    The Painted Hall ceiling

    by kris-t Updated Feb 4, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: 'The allegorical theme of the huge and exuberant Lower Hall ceiling is the triumph of Peace and Liberty over Tyrany, and pays due tribute to William and Mary and British maritime power.'

    Within the oval frame are the four seasons. Beyond the arch in the Upper Hall Queen Anne surveys the continents of the world.

    Fondest memory: Elsewhere much use is made of trompe l’oeil painting, on the columns, windowsills and in the Vestibule.'

    The Painted Hall ceiling The Painted Hall ceiling
    Related to:
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  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    Painted Hall of Greenwich Hospital

    by kris-t Updated Feb 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Painted Hall of Greenwich Hospital is probably the finest dining hall in Europe.
    It was decorated with paintings by James Thornhill, this decoration took 19 years to complete.

    Fondest memory: 'In 1824 the Hall became the ‘National Gallery of Naval Art’ and remained so until 1930s, when its contents were transferred to the newly created National Maritime Museum.

    By 1939 the Painted Hall was once again in use as a dining room. It remained in daily use until the Royal Navy's departure in 1998.

    The Painted Hall and Chapel are open daily, 10am – 5pm, with free admission.

    Painted Hall of Greenwich Hospital Painted Hall of Greenwich Hospital
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  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    Chapel of St.Peter and St.Paul

    by kris-t Updated Feb 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: 'The Chapel of St Peter and St Paul was the last major element in the Hospital’s construction and was completed to Thomas Ripley’s design in 1751.'

    In 1779 the Chapel was gutted in a disastrous fire, thought to have been started by smoking in an adjacent tailor’s workshop. It was redesigned and rebuilt than reopened in 1789.

    The Painted Hall and Chapel of the Hospital remain open to members of the public, and a service is held in the Chapel every Sunday at 11am which is open to all.

    Fondest memory: First Sunday in the mounth 3-00 p.m. free organ recital

    Every Sunday 11-00 a.m. Said Eucharist

    The Chapel of St Peter and St Paul The Chapel of St Peter and St Paul The Chapel of St Peter and St Paul The Chapel of St Peter and St Paul The Chapel of St Peter and St Paul
    Related to:
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    • Religious Travel
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  • jo104's Profile Photo

    Squirrel Nutkin

    by jo104 Updated Jul 28, 2009

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: These squirrels are fairly tame they want your food so if you fancy a photo opportunity with a grey squirrel pack in a few nuts - actually on second thoughts they eat pretty much anything. Make sure you are up to date on your tetanus shots just in case.

    Greenwich Park

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  • Confucius's Profile Photo

    I went aboard the Cutty Sark!

    by Confucius Updated May 21, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: This beautiful clipper ship was built in 1869 and was first used in 1870 to transport tea from the ports of Canton and later Hong Kong back to London. After 1877 it was used for the Australian wool trade for about 10 years and then sold to some Portuguese traders who used it to travel to Portugal's colonial possessions. It finally returned to London for maintenance in 1922 and reverted to British ownership when an old mariner bought and restored it to its present condition.

    Fondest memory: The ship is now a museum and inside you can see prints, paintings, and several relics from its seafaring days as well as an interesting collection of merchant ship figureheads leaning out from the lower deck's walls.

    May 2007 update: Now closed until 2010 for renovations and unfortunate fire damage.

    The Cutty Sark Is Permanently Moored At Greenwich
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  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    Thames

    by kris-t Written Feb 5, 2006

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Greenwich Hospital from the bank of the Thames

    Fondest memory: The hospital occupied its prime riverside site on the south bank of the river Thames in Greenwich, London for over 170 years, closing to pensioners in 1869.

    Greenwich Hospital
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  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    Greenwich Park

    by kris-t Written Feb 5, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: One of the Royal Parks of London, and the first to be enclosed (in 1433), Greenwich Park is a former deer-park in Greenwich and one of the largest single green spaces in south east London.

    Fondest memory: The park stretches along a hillside and is perhaps best imagined as being on two levels. The lower level (closest to the Museum, Queen's House and, beyond them, the River Thames) lies to the north; after a stiff walk uphill, there is a flat expanse that is, essentially, an enclosed extension of the plateau of Blackheath

    Greenwich Park
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  • johnwilky53's Profile Photo

    greenwich by the thames

    by johnwilky53 Written Mar 6, 2005

    Favorite thing: well worth a visit next time your in london.but before you go check out haldenes greenwich page,cos shes done it,bin it,sin,it and wrote a great script..superb visit.

    Fondest memory: pie and mash and a pint of stella in the trafalgar.

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  • irisbe's Profile Photo

    Greenwich covered market

    by irisbe Updated Sep 12, 2004

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    Favorite thing: Already in 1831 this market was at this present location.
    Although it started as a general market, since 1958 it became a fruit and vegetable market.
    Nothing remains the same… so in 1984 again it shifted towards an “Arts and Crafts’ market, opened only on Fridays and weekends. Lucky for me it was a Sunday!.
    The former warehouses surrounding the market became different shops.

    Greenwich covered market
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  • irisbe's Profile Photo

    Gipsy Moth IV (1966)

    by irisbe Updated Sep 12, 2004

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    Favorite thing: Near the river Thames, keeping the Cutty Sark company, the Gipsy Moth IV is waiting to be admired by any one passing by.
    It was the ship on which Francis Chichester, aged 64, set off for a trip around the world.
    He started the journey from Greenwich and he arrived at Plymouth nine months and 1 day later, we write down: 28th May 1967.
    He took a little break before he sailed back to Greenwich and got knighted by the Queen.


    Note:

    The trip with the Gipsy Moth IV was his second attempt to sail around the world. His first trip with his Gipsy Moth biplane ended with an accident and the trip never got completed.

    Gipsy Moth IV (1966)
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  • irisbe's Profile Photo

    Greenwich Foot Tunnel

    by irisbe Updated Sep 12, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Greenwich Foot Tunnel connects the Cutty Sark Gardens and Island Gardens (Isle of Dogs).
    With it’s 1,2176 feet in length at 50 feet deep, it allowed the South London residents to get to their work, located in the docks of the Isle of Dogs.
    It is a design of Sir Alexander Binnie.
    When it opened on August 4th in 1902, it left a bill of 127.000 Pounds.
    The circular; entrance buildings, here pictured at the photo, are similar at both sides of the river.
    A lift or a spiral stairs will get you the 50 feet down into the tunnel, lined with about 200.000 glazed white tiles.
    You have to check if the lift is running. Sometimes it is not!
    You can enter the tunnel between 6 am and 11 pm.

    I have failed going down because of lack of time, but I sure will try next time to walk all the way to the other side!

    Fondest memory: Next time I go down I will tell you if it reminds me of any of the pedestrian tunnel in Antwerp `-)

    Greenwich Foot Tunnel
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  • irisbe's Profile Photo

    Cutty Sark

    by irisbe Updated Sep 12, 2004

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    Favorite thing: The maritime trust clipper ship Cutty Sark, was built in 1869 for the Scotsman Captain JohnWillis Junior.
    It is the only remaining tea clipper in the world. These kind of ships were meant to cross the Atlanic and Pacific Oceans.
    It was built at the Dumbarton yard of Scott and Linton and has a weight of 963 ton.
    At the time she was trusted to the water of the Clyde, she shared the reputation with the “Thermopylae” to be the fasted ship operating on sail alone. The sails were designed by John Rennie. and began it sailing trips to end to be a legend.

    Fondest memory: In 1951, on occasion of the festival of Britain, she was towed to a mooring outside Greenwich. It was in 1954 that she got her present location in a specially constructed dock at Greenwich.
    In 1957 she was opened to the public as a maritime museum

    Cutty Sark
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Greenwich Favorites

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