Greenwich Transportation

  • Thames Clipper at Greenwich
    Thames Clipper at Greenwich
    by Britannia2
  • Greenwich Pier
    Greenwich Pier
    by spidermiss
  • On the boat journey: St Paul's Cathedral
    On the boat journey: St Paul's Cathedral
    by spidermiss

Most Recent Transportation in Greenwich

  • Britannia2's Profile Photo

    Thameslink DaySave

    by Britannia2 Updated Apr 28, 2015

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    This is a ticket that offers unlimited travel on Goviva Thameslink train services between Brighton and Bedford including the Wimbledon / Sutton loop - this ticket is only available at several Tourist Information Centres (TIC) in the London area and Greenwich is one of these. However purchasers should note that FCC trains do not serve Greenwich - the nearest station you could use this ticket is London Bridge mainline.
    You can use the ticket on all Thameslink Netork services (Brighton - Bedford and Wimbledon branches) FCC trains only. After 10.00 an not for north bound services leaving Moorgate or St Pancras between 16.30 and 19.01 for any journey between St Albans and Bedford inclusive.
    1 day - adult £19. Up to 4 accompanied children - £2 each. No rail card discounts (2015 prices)
    Only available at the TIC at Pepys House, 2 Cutty Sark Gardens. NOT available at Greenwich or Maze Hill stations or at the DLR stations.
    I bet they have never sold a ticket - however good value if required. I have included the FCC website link but it does not mention the ticket - however good for maps and train times.

    First Capital Connect Train
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    Cutty Sark for Maritime Greenwich station

    by pieter_jan_v Updated Dec 10, 2014

    The Cutty Sark for Maritime Greenwich station is at the heart of Greenwich.
    The station is served by the Docklands Light Rail (DLR).
    The station opened in 1999 and is one of 3 complete underground railway stations on the line.

    The Bank tube station is the final destination of the DLR from Greenwich.

    Real time PubliC Transportation info on the Greenwich map.

    Cutty Sark for Maritime Greenwich station Cutty Sark for Maritime Greenwich station
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    Greenwich foot tunnel

    by pieter_jan_v Written Dec 1, 2014

    You can walk to Greenwich from the other side of the river using the Greenwich foot tunnel.
    The tunnel opened in 1902, replacing a ferry connection from the Docklands.
    At the start only stairs were available, but not much later lifts were added to reach the tunnel 15 meters lower.

    The tunnel is part of the UK's National Cycle Route 1, that runs from Inverness to Dover.

    Greenwich foot tunnel
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  • spidermiss's Profile Photo

    From Greenwich to Embankment

    by spidermiss Updated Aug 24, 2014

    I opted to return to London via the River Thames instead of facing buses and the trains during Friday's rush hour. So I rode on a Thames Clipper from Greenwich Pier to the Embankment. It wasn't cheap (around 6 gbp one way (July 2014) but it was worth it for the views along the River Thames and is a lot more relaxing to travel on than other modes of transport. Oyster Cards are accepted and you receive a small discount using them on the River Thames Ciipper services.

    It took me approximately 45 minutes to travel from Greenwich Pier to the Embankment.

    Greenwich Pier On the boat journey: Tower Bridge Embankment Pier On the boat journey: St Paul's Cathedral On the boat journey: Tower of London
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  • spidermiss's Profile Photo

    From Central London to Greenwich

    by spidermiss Updated Aug 24, 2014

    I took the 188 bus from Russell Square to Greenwich (the bus travels onto North Greenwich where it terminates). On my way I had to change buses at Elephant and Castle (near Southwark) but I was able to get a transfer ticket so I didn't have to pay for another journey. The journey, without the change at Elephant and Castle, usually takes 45 minutes or longer depending on traffic.

    Crossing the River Thames on the bus Crossing the River Thames on the bus Passing Tower Bridge on our way to Greenwich Surrey Quays (on our way to Greenwich) Surrey Quays District (on our way to Greenwich)
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    Greenwich Foot Tunnel

    by spidermiss Updated Aug 24, 2014

    Greenwich Foot Tunnel, designed by a civil engineer, Alexander Binnie and took three years to complete. It opened in 1902 with the purpose of giving docks workers, living on the south side of Thames, reliable and pedestrian access to the Isle of Dogs docks and shipyards. The tunnel is over a 1000 feet long and is 50 feet under the River Thames and is accessed from either Cutty Sark Gardens or Islands Gardens.The lifts (installed in 1904 and upgraded in 2012) and the stairs at both ends takes the pedestrians down below.

    It is worth stopping at the Island Gardens for the amazing views of the Old Royal Naval College across the Thames and then take the foot tunnel across to Greenwich.

    The Foot Tunnel Entrance, Cutty Sark Gardens The Foot Tunnel Entrance, Cutty Sark Gardens The tunnel down below! The tunnel down below! Old Royal Naval College from Island Gardens Park
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    Docklands Light Railway and other travel options

    by toonsarah Written Aug 11, 2014

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    In addition to travel by water, either on the clipper or a sightseeing cruise, there are plenty of land-based ways to travel to and from Greenwich. I find the most convenient to me the Docklands Light Railway or DLR as it is usually called. This has a station, Cutty Sark, in the centre of Greenwich’s main shopping area, right by the market and only a few minutes’ walk from most of the sights. Catch an eastbound train from Tower Gateway or Bank and change at Westferry for a southbound one (there are also some direct trains from Bank – look for one with the destination Lewisham). Alternatively you can catch the Jubilee line of the Underground to Canary wharf and change there, but be aware that the two systems use different stations a short distance apart.

    Other options include the Jubilee line to North Greenwich and then bus 188, or a mainline train from Charing Cross or London Bridge to Greenwich station, followed by a ten minute walk into the centre. Whatever route you take, you should be in the heart of the action in Greenwich in less than an hour.

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  • toonsarah's Profile Photo

    To Greenwich on the Clipper

    by toonsarah Written Aug 11, 2014

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    On our most recent visit to Greenwich we took a new (for us) route – we came on the Thames Clipper service. This is a boat bus service and a great way to travel on the river. You don’t get the commentary that you get on the sightseeing cruises but you don’t pay their high prices either – and you can even use your Oyster Card.

    There are five regular routes which between them cover the river from Putney in the west to Woolwich in the east, although to cover that distance you’ll have to change in central London. We boarded the RB1 service at the London Eye and travelled the approximately 35 minutes to Greenwich Pier. Boats run every 20 minutes during the day, more frequently during the peak rush hour times, and less frequently after 9.00 pm. There is no need to book in advance – just turn up and pay at the booth on the pier, or use your Oyster card, which entitles you to a 10% discount on the fares. A single fare on the longer routes (west London to the centre or central London to Woolwich) is £6.80 or £6.12 with the Oyster discount. You can also get return tickets (but we planned to return on the DLR – see next tip) and River Roamers if you plan to use the service a lot.

    Seating on board is plentiful (maybe less so during the rush hour) and there is a snack bar where you can buy coffees, beer and wine, crisps and chocolate etc. The boats are fully wheelchair accessible and there are accessible toilets on board. All in all, this is a very comfortable way to travel.

    On the Clipper From the Clipper near Greenwich Greenwich Pier

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  • Britannia2's Profile Photo

    Thames Clippers

    by Britannia2 Written Apr 6, 2014

    With an Oyster card it is just £5.85 from central London to Greenwich on a fast Thames Clipper. The Clippers stop at all of central Londons piers and go east to Greenwich and then further to the 02.
    There are refreshments on board but beware that sometimes the toilets are not very pleasant -you are not on board for long so it should not be a problem.
    A great way to get to Greenwich and see Londons sights from the river and not the street.

    Thames Clipper at Greenwich

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  • pieter_jan_v's Profile Photo

    O2 Dome Bus station - North Greenwich

    by pieter_jan_v Updated Aug 2, 2013

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    Next to the O2 Dome at North Greenwich is the Bus station located.

    The North Greenwich bus station is served by these buses:
    -108 Stratford Bus Station and Lewisham Bus Station
    -129 Greenwich Town Centre / Cutty Sark
    -132 Geddes Place
    -161 Chislehurst War Memorial
    -188 Russell Square Station
    -422 Bexleyheath Bus Garage
    -472 Thamesmead Town Centre
    -486 Friswell Place

    O2 Dome Bus station - North Greenwich O2 Dome Bus station - North Greenwich North Greenwich Bus station
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    If you can't walk on the water, walk under it!

    by planxty Written Dec 31, 2012

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    There are various options for reaching Greenwich, which is on the South side of the river Thames from the North side, which is incidentally where I live. You can drive through the Blackwall or Rotherhithe tunnels, take the Tube, a bus or even the hugely terrifying Air Line cable car if you are an adrenaline junkie. There is, however, another slightly quirky way with a great deal of history behind it and I rather like it. That way is the Greenwich Foot Tunnel.

    I was recently showing VT member Regina1965 round the East End and Greenwich. I asked her if she fancied seeing the tunnel and she said she did so that was decided. It runs from Island Gardens at the Southern end of the Isle of Dogs on the North side to just beside the Cutty Sark on the South side. You can tell each end of it by the distinctive dome shaped entrances (pictured). I had not been through the tunnel for a long time and I had remembered the lovely wooden lift compartments, complete with seats that used to take you up and down if you didn't fancy the stairs. Well, as you can see, the interior is still as it was but a recent refurbishment has installed very modern glass and chrome doors. Frankly, I think they are hideous and I am surprised they were allowed to instal them in such a historic place.

    Once at the bottom, it becomes a slightly eerie place although it is perfectly safe. It is colder than above ground, always feels slightly damp and it echoes. I know it has been used as a location for numerous videos and films. I don't mind it but I have walked friends through here before who positively hated it and it is certainly not recommended for claustrophobes. Regina mentioned that it made her feel slightly off balance which is a reaction I had not encountered before and no, we hadn't been to the pub first (that came later)!

    So how did this excellent piece of engineering come into being? Begun in the last year of the 19th century and completed in 1902, it was primarily a means of bringing workers from the South side of the river to their places of employment in the London Docks. There was a ferry previously but it was not reliable so the tunnel was built, mostly at the urging of Will Crooks, a famous local politician of the time.

    One thing to beware of here is cyclists. Despite numerous signs telling them not to, inconsiderate cyclists still insist on riding through the tunnel. Don't get me wrong, I am a cyclist myself and have nothing against the concept but it is fools like this that get us all a bad name. An additional nuisance is skateboarders who mostly infest the place at the weekends.

    The tunnel is always open although the lifts may not be working all the time and you'll have toi use the stairs. It is a bit of a trek but not too bad. It is free to use. You really should take a wander through here if you are in the area.

    Greenwich Foot Tunnel, London, UK. Greenwich Foot Tunnel, London, UK. Greenwich Foot Tunnel, London, UK. Greenwich Foot Tunnel, London, UK. Greenwich Foot Tunnel, London, UK.
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    Olympics: Avoid the Tube; take the Train

    by SurfaceTravel Updated Jul 26, 2012

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    The London 2012 Olympics and Paralympics will run from July 27 to August 12 and from August 29 to September 9 respectively. Public and road transport throughout London will most likely be prone to delays, confusion, and severe overcrowding during these times, particularly during the Olympic Games. Greenwich Park is hosting Equestrian and Pentathlon events the following dates specifically: Jul. 28 - 31, Aug. 2 - 6, 8 - 9, 11 - 12, 30 - 31, and Sept. 1 - 4.

    Most tourists in London tend to follow the Tube network for public transportation, as this is a main method of travel within central London. By following that well-known Tube map, they would make their way to Greenwich via the Jubilee Line and then transfer to the Docklands Light Railway (DLR) to Cutty Sark. This route will therefore likely be very crowded and miserable during the dates above.

    What is not evident on the Tube map is the regular surface commuter train network. You can take these trains using your same Oyster Card or travel card that you would use on the Tube/DLR. Trains run directly to Greenwich Station from Charing Cross, Cannon Street, and London Bridge stations in central London. I would, however, avoid getting on or off at London Bridge, as Network Rail will be implementing insanely confusing routes in and out of that station that will most likely cause more delays and crowding.

    There are also direct trains from Charing Cross, Cannon Street, London Bridge, and also Victoria to Blackheath Station. Blackheath is a small quaint village near the upper (south) entrance to Greenwich Park. It's a pleasant 15 minute walk across the Heath from the station.

    The trains are more direct, faster, and generally much more civilised. Furthermore, you will likely be travelling against the regular commuting crowd, so reasonably likely to get an actual seat. I would recommend this route to Greenwich, whether or not there are Olympic Games on. Trains generally run every 20 minutes.

    - The usual web-site for travel planning by commuter train is: www.nationalrail.co.uk
    - Web-site specifically for planning travel during the Games: www.london2012.com/venue/greenwich-park/travel
    - Another web-site: www.londonjourneyolympics.org

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    Train to Greenwich

    by Britannia2 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Many tourists think that the only way the way to Greenwich is the Docklands Light Railway (DLR). This is because a quick look at the tube map shows Greenwich can be reached in this way but although this is a good way to get to Greenwich the main line train is actually quicker.
    Take a train directly from Charing Cross, Waterloo East, Cannon Street or London Bridge and the journey is less than 15 minutes - Greenwich is the stop after Deptford. This is Londons oldest railway route.
    The trains are modern, clean and off peak there are always seats. The website link has more details. The train company is South Eastern Trains.
    Greenwich station (pictured) is a recently renovated building and a short walk (turn left outside the station) to the town centre. The station has a small cafe, toilets and a book stall.

    London bound train enters Greenwich station
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  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    By Bus

    by kris-t Updated Feb 3, 2011

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    To Greenwich town centre: 177, 180, 188, 286, 386

    To Greenwich Park (Blackheath): 53, X53.

    The 188 bus from Russell Square comes through the town centre on its way to North Greenwich Underground station.

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    By DLR

    by kris-t Written Feb 3, 2011

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    Docklands Light Railway direct to Cutty Sark.

    Cutty Sark station is a twenty-minute journey from Bank and Tower Gateway Stations and only ten minutes from Canary Wharf, where you change from the Jubilee Line to the DLR using the covered walkway to Heron Quays Station.

    Lewisham and Stratford are major gateways for those coming from Kent and Essex respectively.

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