Historical, London

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  • Canada Gate
    Canada Gate
    by balhannah
  • Historical
    by Regina1965
  • The Norwegian flag in St Olave´s church.
    The Norwegian flag in St Olave´s church.
    by Regina1965
  • rickyvilla81's Profile Photo

    Plague! Plague! Fire! Fire!

    by rickyvilla81 Written Mar 10, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The Monument to the Great Fire of London, 1666, is to be found next to - wait for it - Monument Station, and was built in the 1670s by the great London architect Sir Christopher Wren. He was charged with building over 50 new churches, and several other civic buildings, which had been totally destroyed in the Great Fire. In a way, had the Fire itself not happened, Wren may never have got his lucky break.
    Now the story goes like this.
    In 1665, London was visited by the most terrible outbreak of bubonic plague since the Black Death, borne by fleas that lived on the backs of Black Rats. Alas, when the first illnesses occurred, Londoners didn't realise it was a rat problem, and blamed the countless cats and dogs that were kept in the city. So they killed every single one - poor Fido. This of course meant that the rats were allowed to flourish unchecked - and the plague spread like news of Bill and Monica. A third of Londoners died.
    And then in early September 1666, the baker Thomas Faryner, whose bakery was in Pudding Lane, left his oven on one night, and it started a fire. Not a big one, not one to cause any disturbance. In fact, the Mayor of London at the time refused to even get out of bed for the news, claiming that "a woman could pisss it out"!
    Wise as ever. The Fire did spread, to the warehouses on the banks of the Thames, which were filled with brandy, pitch and other highly inflammable substances. Up went the flames, engulfing the densely built wooden houses, and within four days, the medieval city of London was gone forever.
    Miraculously only nine people were killed! It finished off the rats, though, and the plague, and Wren got to rebuild London on a grander scale. The Monument is a testament to the Fire, and is crowned with a golden ball of flames. There are 311 steps to the top, and if the column (which is the largest 17th century column on Earth) were to fall, the tip of it would reach Pudding Lane, where the Fire began.

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  • The best introduction

    by derry Written Aug 26, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Visit the Museum of London for a fascinating introduction to the city's history. Find out about the city from prehistoric times, with lots of fascinating exhibits and reconstructions. View remnants of the city walls from the museum's windows; listen to oral history; walk through a Victorian street. The perfect way to start getting to know this amazing place!

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

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  • Geoff_Wright's Profile Photo

    A Short History of...

    by Geoff_Wright Written Aug 25, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: A Short History of London

    Any visitor to London should know a little of its long history, so here goes. Londinium was an early Roman outpost, and after the departure of the Romans, it lost its obscurity until 886, when it again emerged as an important town under the control of King Alfred. Under the Normans and Plantagenets, the city grew commercially and politically and during the reign of Richard I (1189-99) obtained a form of municipal government from which the modern City Corporation developed. Medieval London saw the foundation of the Inns of Court and the construction of Westminster Abbey. By the 14th century London had become the political capital of England. The reign of Elizabeth I (1558-1603) brought London to a level of great wealth, power, and influence. In 1665 the great plague (the Black Death) took some 75,000 lives. This was followed by the Great Fire of London (see below) in September 1666, which lasted for 5 days and virtually destroyed the city. Sir Christopher Wren played a large part in the re-building of the city, designing more than 51 churches, notably the rebuilt St. Paul's Cathedral. Until Westminster Bridge was opened in 1750, London Bridge, first built in the 10th century, was the only bridge to span the River Thames. During the Victorian era London acquired tremendous prestige as the capital of the British Empire and as a cultural and intellectual centre. Many of the buildings in central London were destroyed or badly damaged in air raids during the Second World War, and some buildings still show evidence of this damage to this day.

    Fondest memory: Unfortunately I don't have many photos of London, but there are loads of really good web sites available. I have found some of them that relate to the topics I've described, and made the links to the pages, so just click on them as you go, and discover what London is all about. Have a great tour! Geoff.

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    Lewes Castle, Lewes

    by Plendil Written Aug 25, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Fondest memory: Stop at Lewes (pronounced Lewis I think) and have a look around the castle. Unfortunately I did not have time to do this so one day I may return because it looked quite a decent place to spend a few hours.

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  • Even if you are not a history...

    by AndrewMilk Written Aug 24, 2002

    Favorite thing: Even if you are not a history buff, you must see the sights in London. I sometimes like to avoid tourist spots, however there is so much history there you really must see as many places as possible. My favorite place was St Paul's Cathedral. Breathtaking.

    Fondest memory: The history in London puts the US to shame. I visited areas that I had learned about as a child, and that had been there for hundreds of years.

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  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    Tower of London - Tower Green

    by kris-t Updated Jan 31, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Tower Green

    Favorite thing: Tower Green is an open piece of ground right at the heart of the Tower of London.

    During the Middle Ages, the area was used as a burial ground.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Museum Visits

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  • jorgec25's Profile Photo

    The oldest piece at the British Museum

    by jorgec25 Written Sep 21, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    British Museum

    Favorite thing: The oldest piece at the British Museum is located at the beautiful library, and is something like 1.8 million years old and it's a chopping tool.

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

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  • Gypsystravels's Profile Photo

    London Phone Booths

    by Gypsystravels Updated Jan 2, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    My beautiful baby
    1 more image

    Favorite thing: Dotted throughout London you'll find these phone booths. Many are being eliminated and it makes for a nice pic.

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  • spgood301's Profile Photo

    More pictures from the British Museum

    by spgood301 Written Dec 21, 2006

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    From the British Museum
    4 more images

    Favorite thing: Here are some more pictures from the British Museum. I hope they give you some idea of what this fascinating museum is all about. Next time you're in London, do stop by.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

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  • ginte's Profile Photo

    National Maritime Museum

    by ginte Updated Oct 22, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: National Maritime Museum is the largest of its kind in the world, with over two million items in its collections. It's a place for a visit for almost a whole day and very inspiring.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Family Travel

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  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    Tower of London -The Martin Tower

    by kris-t Written Feb 6, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Tower of London -The Martin Tower
    1 more image

    Favorite thing: For 200 years this tower was known as the Jewel Tower because the Crown Jewels were displayed here from 1669 to 1841. Today the Martin Tower houses the exhibition Crowns & Diamonds

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

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  • HarShe's Profile Photo

    Historical pub

    by HarShe Written Dec 24, 2005

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Sherlock Holmes Pub

    Fondest memory: I did not get a chance to go in, but was intrigued by the name. I have been told it is one of the oldest pubs in old London town.

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  • BluBluBlu's Profile Photo

    Maple leaves...

    by BluBluBlu Written Oct 17, 2005

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    Favorite thing: This is a memorial for those Canadians that died in WW2...its in Green Park...and is subtle...but cool!

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  • BluBluBlu's Profile Photo

    At last...

    by BluBluBlu Updated Oct 16, 2005

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: This is a recent memorial sighted in Whitehall that finally recognises the role women played in the 2nd World War...I like the fact that its an impression of hats & coats...they've just popped out...

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  • daryll's Profile Photo

    The Greek 'Panthenon'

    by daryll Updated May 30, 2005

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Greek sculpture

    Favorite thing: I was just imagining how fantastic it could be for those days people live during the period romans and greeks!

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

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