Parks and Gardens, London

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  • Parks and Gardens
    by arturowan
  • Parks and Gardens
    by arturowan
  • Lady feeding the Squirrels
    Lady feeding the Squirrels
    by balhannah
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    Hide Park

    by solopes Updated Sep 15, 2014

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    Favorite thing: Taking advantage of the wet weather, London shines with excellent parks. Hide park is a world, where several experiences may be lived, from the calm of people relaxing under the furtive sun, to the free assemblies in its corner.

    Hide park - London
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    London alive!

    by arturowan Written Jul 9, 2014

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    Favorite thing: London is a fantastically busy place, with so much to see & do, really the place is just too much!
    Historic architecture, world class museums & galleries, 1 of the best public transport systems in the world, there has to be something for everybody...
    There really does have to be something seriously wrong with a person if they cannot find a niche of satisfaction to be had in this great city!
    What I love about London is its quiet places, & believe it or not, the city does have a tranquil, even soothing side, existing parallel with the commuter hustle & bustle...
    A paradox of London is the extent of its green-spaces - I have read that a third of the city's surface area is still green, though I do find this difficult to accept for a fact (?)
    Whatever, in London you are never more than a walk away from a park or garden, & this is why I have always felt at home in London...
    Having always lived in the country, I do not regard myself as a 'city person', but I still believe that London is 1 of the cities where I would get by & enjoy myself...
    Cities without green-spaces are suffocating places, but I have never felt this way within central London, there is always a park bench somewhere, to sit & watch the world go by...
    & in London, you are within a world in itself, & that makes for fascinating people-watching, studying architecture, or communing with critters!
    Living in the country I know you need to be a dedicated wildlife watcher & be prepared to spend hours sitting still & silent under a tree, in order to achieve a close encounter with furtive wild creatures...
    But in London, the wild things are often not backwards at coming forwards, & if you do sit on a public bench, you will almost certainly be sharing it with a pigeon which regards it as its own perch!
    If you have something to eat, you can expect a squirrel to be bold enough to come & beg, & there is also a chance of a close encounter with a fox...
    0ne of the wonders of London is not only that it remains a habitat for wildlife, but that cunning creatures here are actually better fed & sheltered than their counterparts 'out in the sticks!'

    Fondest memory: I have liked London ever since my very first visit, when I was still at school...
    0ver the years I have arrived in the city by train or coach, but I prefer the view from a bus - it feels like a labyrinth from the moment you reach outer London, passing the shops & terraces which feel very repetitive until you draw closer to the centre...
    Arriving from the east, out of Essex, it is when I see Stratford railway station that I know the excitement inside, telling me that this really is London!
    Some folks will tell you all sorts of scare stories about this city, & it does have a history of violence, crime & prostitution, but I am a great believer that you get what you are seeking after!
    I have never had a negative experience in central London, & indeed I would recommend that you visit in the winter, because in this well-lit city, the early nightfall can be quite magical...
    The best time to see the Thames is after dark, when the street lights reflect in its water like a mirror - this is when the river & all London is most beautiful...

    London - always best seen from a bus window... A minimalist London lawn!
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    English Gardens

    by draguza Updated Jul 5, 2013

    Favorite thing: One of the most fascinating city gardens is hidden behind towering brick walls near the Chelsea Royal Hospital. Founded in 1673 as an apothecaries garden to train students, Chelsea Physic Garden is still used today for education and medicinal research. 5, 000 plants are somehow charmingly crammed into lovely greenhouses, plots and trails. Their gallery houses gorgeous prints and watercolors. Public hours are restricted to Wednesdays through Fridays and Sundays, April through October. Also on site are a nice little shop and a cafe. Events, activities and lectures are held regularly. Most Londoners have heard of the garden yet few have ever visited this hidden gem

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    Hyde Park

    by draguza Updated Jul 5, 2013

    Favorite thing: At over 350 acres, Hyde Park is one of the largest green spaces in Central London.
    Hyde Park provides facilities for many different leisure activities and sports as well as being the focal point for public events of all sizes.
    An oasis of tranquillity in central London, Hyde Park, together with Kensington Gardens to the west, is the largest of the three royal parks. On the north-east side is Speaker's Corner, a traditional haven of free speech. It is also famous for the Serpentine boating lake, complete with a designated swimming area, and the Serpentine Gallery. Lesser known is the Dogs' Cemetery at the northern end of the park. The graves commemorate more than 200 pooches who enjoyed the park in their day.

    Swans in the park.. Angry in the park
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    Postman´s Park and the memorial.

    by Regina1965 Updated Mar 1, 2013

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    Favorite thing: By St. Botolph without Aldersgate church there is one of the largest parks in the City of London, the Postman´s Park. It isn´t that large though, smallish, I would say, but green spaces in the Square Mile, a.k.a. the City of London, are rare. The park got its name from the postmen having their lunch in the park, but the London Chief Post Office was located close by. The Postman´s Park is built on a burial ground, being located next to a church, and was opened in 1880.

    There is a memorial in the Postman´s Park, the Memorial to Heroic Self Sacrifice (The Wall of Heroes), which was installed in the park in 1900. It is a memorial to those who lost their lives trying to save others. There are so many placards at the memorial, made of glazed ceramic tiles, with heartbreaking stories of people who died trying to save others - even children as young as 8 trying to save their younger siblings. I was so sad and touched that I couldn´t help but crying when I visited it and read the tribute to these heroes on all the placards. It is just heartbreaking, both the love and helpfulness, that caused these people to risk their own life for saving others - and the loss of these helpful individuals and the grief that followed their death :( I think anybody would be touched visiting the memorial.

    The memorial was made by the painter George Watts, and names are still being added to the memorial.

    Fondest memory: Parts of the film Closer were filmed in Postman´s Park.

    There is a Gothic style drinking fountain by the east entrance to the park, dating back to 1876. It is Grade II listed. The east railings are also Grade II listed. And so is the Memorial to Heroic Self Sacrifice - Grade II listed as a "curiosity".

    The park is located by Aldersgate Street, a little north of St. Paul´s Cathedral.

    Postman��s Park - a lovely pond with fish. The Memorial to Heroic Self Sacrifice The Memorial to Heroic Self Sacrifice is The Memorial to Heroic Self Sacrifice The Memorial to Heroic Self Sacrifice

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    GARDEN'S IN JULY

    by balhannah Written Sep 7, 2012

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    Favorite thing: It was July and meant to be Summer when we were in London.

    July turned out to be a good time to see the gardens. The lawns were green and most of the flower beds were well advanced and flowering well. Annuals as well as Perennials were blooming.
    I was more than happy with what I saw in July.

    London gardens London gardens London gardens
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    ANIMALS & BIRDS OF ST. JAMES PARK

    by balhannah Written Sep 7, 2012

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    Favorite thing: St. James Park turned out to be quite a good location for seeing some of London's wildlife.

    As it has the large lake, there are quite a few water breeds that call it home. The Mallard is probably the most well known wild duck, and one we have at home, and I often see in other parts of the world.
    The Tufted Duck, is one we hadn't seen before. It comes from Iceland and northern Europe.
    The Male is mostly black with a distinctive tuft of feathers on the back of its head and white flashes on its sides. It is diver, so now you see them, now you don't!
    We saw other British Duck's, I not sure which. Varieties that can be seen here, include Shelduck, Wigeon, Gadwall, Teal, Pintail, Shoveler, Common Pochard and Goldeneye, Canada and Greylag Geese.

    The shrubberies is where you may see one of the smaller Birds, like Wrens and Robins. Come at night, and perhaps you will see the Tawny Owl.

    Really great to see this Birdlife in the centre of busy London!

    Birds @ St. James Park Birds @ St. James Park
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    THOSE PESKY SQUIRRELS!

    by balhannah Written Sep 7, 2012

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    Favorite thing: Pesky, perhaps to Londoners, but to me, who hasn't got these small creatures in her home country, they were cute!
    In St. James Park, there were quite a few running around and eating nuts that had fallen onto the lawn.
    I spoke to an old lady who was feeding them scraps. Her pleasure was coming here each day to do this. The Squirrel's weren't interested in us, we didn't have food!
    We just hung around and watched as they scampered up and into the food, what lucky Squirrels these are!

    Lady feeding the Squirrels
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    Regent's Park

    by kris-t Updated Jan 9, 2011

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    Favorite thing: Regent's Park (officially The Regent's Park) is one of the Royal Parks of London. It is in the northern part of central London partly in the City of Westminster and partly in the London Borough of Camden.

    Fondest memory: The park has an outer ring road called the Outer Circle (4.3km) and an inner ring road called the Inner Circle, which contains the most carefully tended section of the park, Queen Mary's Gardens.

    Apart from a link road between these two, the park is reserved for pedestrians. The south, east and most of the west sides of the park are lined with elegant white stucco terraces of houses designed by John Nash. Running through the northern end of the park is Regent's Canal which connects the Grand Union Canal to the former London Docks.

    Regent's Park Regent's Park Regent's Park Regent's Park
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    Chelsea Flower Show

    by deeper_blue Updated May 9, 2010

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    Favorite thing: The World Famous Chelsea Flower Show takes place in May for 4 days at the Royal Hospital Showground, Chelsea. Closest Tube station is Sloane Square. Tickets are not cheap but you can see many many beautiful gardens, in 2009 a special award was given to this garden (pictured) made completely out of plasticine!

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    Regent's Park

    by yooperprof Updated Sep 18, 2009

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    Favorite thing: Thank you, George, Prince Regent (later King George IV), for this wonderful urban park that bears your name. You may have been a big schlub, a fat selfish preening conceited fop, but at least you had taste and vision.

    It was the Prince Regent in 1811 who began turning what had been a royal farm and hunting grounds into a public space. Actually, his architectural guru John Nash originally hoped to build a grand royal palace here. That did not take place, but Nash did design several spacious villas and whole series of townhouse rows surrounding the central green space. Nash also helped with the layout of the public gardens in the central zone of the park. It finally opened to the public in 1845, although at first it was just for two days a week.

    Today, Regent's Park is 410 acres of green space. Among the many attractions: a large duck pond, various formal rose gardens, many sports pitches, the London Zoo, an Open Air Theatre, and many long and attractive paths, often lined with towering trees. It's a good place for a picnic lunch, or just a short break from the comings and goings of the city.

    The Pond at Regent's Park
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    St. James' Park

    by yooperprof Updated Aug 21, 2009

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    Favorite thing: The oldest of London parks, 93 acres of Englishness in gardening. St. James' dates back to the 16th century, when Henry VIII used the land here for a deer park. (It had been a swamp, and the grounds can still be quite marshy after a heavy rain. But the soil is good for flowers!)

    Charles II opened the park to the public after the Restoration, and it had a major overhall during the reign of George IV under the supervision of the brilliant John Nash.

    Some of the most romantic and picturesque views in England are here.

    http://www.royalparks.org.uk/parks/st_james_park/

    the flowers that bloom in the spring
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    Hampstead Heath

    by Airpunk Written May 11, 2009

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    Favorite thing: The parkland of Hampstead Heath are a popular recreation area for Londoners and visitors. Being popular as such for centuries, it has many features like small gardens, ponds etc. Some of the ponds are even used by swimmers during summertime.
    Around Hampstead Heath, you will find many points of interest: These are Hampstead itself, 2 Willow Road, Fenton House, Kenwood House,Camden with its famous markets and many more I haven’t discovered yet. Hampstead and the hamlet of Vale of Health (which lies in the middle of Hampstead Heath) are among the most expensive areas in the world. Many celebrities and other millionaires – as well as artists and intellectuals - have first and second homes there.

    For details about the mentioned museums and sights, please check out my respective tips.

    For the Heath and the mansions in Hamsptead, get out and Hampstead tube station. For those who want to know: It is the deepest in the whole underground network!

    Hampstead Heath Clocktower in Hampstead
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  • Airpunk's Profile Photo

    Hampstead Heath

    by Airpunk Updated May 11, 2009

    Favorite thing: The parkland of Hampstead Heath are a popular recreation area for Londoners and visitors. Being popular as such for centuries, it has many features like small gardens, ponds etc. Some of the ponds are even used by swimmers during summertime.
    Around Hampstead Heath, you will find many points of interest: These are Hampstead itself, 2 Willow Road, Fenton House, Kenwood House,Camden with its famous markets and many more I haven’t discovered yet. Hampstead and the hamlet of Vale of Health (which lies in the middle of Hampstead Heath) are among the most expensive areas in the world. Many celebrities and other millionaires – as well as artists and intellectuals - have first and second homes there.

    For details about the mentioned museums and sights, please check out my respective tips.

    For the Heath and the mansions in Hamsptead, get out and Hampstead tube station. For those who want to know: It is the deepest in the whole underground network!

    Hampstead Heath Clocktower in Hampstead
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    Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew

    by DEBBBEDB Updated Feb 9, 2009

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    Favorite thing: under construction

    Adults


    £13


    Concessions


    £12


    Children under 17 (accompanied by an adult)


    FREE



    Late entry (45 minutes before Glasshouses close)


    £12


    Disabled visitors


    £12


    Registered blind/partially-sighted visitors


    FREE


    Essential carers of wheelchair users and
    blind/partially-sighted visitors


    FREE

    Passion flower Rose Water Lily Fall Crocus Cyclamen
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