Parks and Gardens, London

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  • Birds @ St. James Park
    Birds @ St. James Park
    by balhannah
  • Parks and Gardens
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  • Lady feeding the Squirrels
    Lady feeding the Squirrels
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  • Regina1965's Profile Photo

    Postman´s Park and the memorial.

    by Regina1965 Updated Mar 1, 2013

    5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Postman��s Park - a lovely pond with fish.
    4 more images

    Favorite thing: By St. Botolph without Aldersgate church there is one of the largest parks in the City of London, the Postman´s Park. It isn´t that large though, smallish, I would say, but green spaces in the Square Mile, a.k.a. the City of London, are rare. The park got its name from the postmen having their lunch in the park, but the London Chief Post Office was located close by. The Postman´s Park is built on a burial ground, being located next to a church, and was opened in 1880.

    There is a memorial in the Postman´s Park, the Memorial to Heroic Self Sacrifice (The Wall of Heroes), which was installed in the park in 1900. It is a memorial to those who lost their lives trying to save others. There are so many placards at the memorial, made of glazed ceramic tiles, with heartbreaking stories of people who died trying to save others - even children as young as 8 trying to save their younger siblings. I was so sad and touched that I couldn´t help but crying when I visited it and read the tribute to these heroes on all the placards. It is just heartbreaking, both the love and helpfulness, that caused these people to risk their own life for saving others - and the loss of these helpful individuals and the grief that followed their death :( I think anybody would be touched visiting the memorial.

    The memorial was made by the painter George Watts, and names are still being added to the memorial.

    Fondest memory: Parts of the film Closer were filmed in Postman´s Park.

    There is a Gothic style drinking fountain by the east entrance to the park, dating back to 1876. It is Grade II listed. The east railings are also Grade II listed. And so is the Memorial to Heroic Self Sacrifice - Grade II listed as a "curiosity".

    The park is located by Aldersgate Street, a little north of St. Paul´s Cathedral.

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    St. James' Park

    by dvideira Written Sep 26, 2004

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    st. james' park - london

    Favorite thing: St James's Park is probably the most beautiful and intimate of the capital's central parks.
    It takes its name from the nearby Palace and it is the oldest of London's Royal parks.

    It is a popular place to stroll, feed the ducks or watch the pelicans. In the summer, there are lots of sunbathing office workers. There is a cafe providing refreshments and a playground at the Buckingham Palace end.

    The lake is now a wildlfowl sanctuary, with ducks, geese, pelicans and black swans. The bridge over it gives a view of Buckingham Palace, good at night when the palace is floodlit.

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    Hampstead Heath

    by dvideira Written Sep 26, 2004

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    hampstead heat - london

    Favorite thing: Hampstead Heath divides the hilltop villages of Hampstead and Highgate and has a variety of landscapes: heathland, meadows, hills, ponds and lakes.

    It is known as the "Lungs of London" and it is one of the capital's most popular green space.

    In the 791 acres you can stroll, take a guided walk, jog, sunbathe, picnic, fish, play football, tennis or bowls and swim in one of the ponds or Parliament Hill Lido.

    On the northern edge of Hampstead Heath is Kenwood House, a fine neo-classical mansion, now maintained by English Heritage. The house contains the Iveagh Bequest, the finest private collection of paintings ever given to the nation. In the summer Kenwood House hosts very popular lakeside concerts.

    .

    Fondest memory: What I like most about this place is that, unlike the other parks in London -- so ornamental and planned -- this one is
    is a great semi-natural park, not "designed space" .

    From Parliament Hill, to the south of Hampstead Heath, it offers magnificent views over central London.

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    Kew Gardens - Royal Botanic Gardens

    by dvideira Written Sep 26, 2004

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    palm house - kew gardens - london

    Favorite thing: Three hundred acres of botanical delights grace Kew Gardens, which lies on the south bank of the Thames River between Richmond and Kew in the suburbs of south-west London.

    The spectacular Palm House, built between 1844-48, is the finest surviving Victorian glass and iron structure in the country. It was originally heated by coal, supplied by an underground railway from the Campanile, 100 yards away by Victoria Gate.

    The "Tube" (London Underground) is the best way to get to Kew from the centre or West End of London. Buses serve those living north or south of Kew (Ealing down to Kingston) and the neighbouring suburbs. From north London, Silverlink trains run directly to Kew Gardens station.

    Adults
    £8.50
    Concessions
    £6.00
    Children up to and including 16 years
    (to be accompanied by an adult)
    FREE

    For opening times, please take a look here

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  • dvideira's Profile Photo

    Kew Gardens

    by dvideira Written Sep 26, 2004

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    kew gardens - london

    Favorite thing: Hidden among the trees are some historic buildings including Kew Palace, the Great Pagoda and the Victorian glass houses. From the beautifully tended parkland there are views up and down the river and across to Syon House.

    The Pagoda was completed in 1762 as a surprise for Princess Augusta, Princess of Wales and mother of George III. After the death of her husband, Frederick, Princess Augusta had continued developing the estate at Kew, starting the first botanic garden on a site close to the present Orangery, and having the site landscaped in accordance with the prevailing fashions of the day. The Pagoda was one of several buildings designed by Sir William Chambers, Princess Augusta's official architect, to ornament the estate.

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  • irisbe's Profile Photo

    Victoria Embankment Gardens

    by irisbe Updated Jun 29, 2004

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    Victoria Embankment Gardens

    Favorite thing: Victoria Embankment Gardens is a nice green lung in the middle of the heavy traffic.
    It lies just outside the Embankment Tube station.
    It exists out of a garden with grass parts on which some you are allowed to sit and others you cannot walk on; a cafeteria with terrace where you can have a drink; some statues and a little corner with a stage and real beach chairs from which you can see the performances.

    Fondest memory: When I was visiting there was a kind of Russian folkdance group.
    The music and the jumping feet of the dancers mixed well with the afternoon sun!



    Panoramic picture, click on it to enjoy the full size!



    For more pictures about the park and our meeting there visit my Fotki album.

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  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    Buckingham Palace Gardens

    by kris-t Updated Feb 21, 2006

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    Buckingham Palace Gardens
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    Favorite thing: Buckingham Palace Gardens are the Queen's back garden. The gardens occupy a 42 acre (17 hectare) site in the City of Westminster, London between Constitution Hill to the north, Hyde Park Corner to the west, Grosvenor Place to the south-west and the Royal Mews and Buckingham Palace to the south and east. Notable features include a large 19th century lake, which is graced by a flock of flamingoes, and the Waterloo Vase.

    Fondest memory: Unlike the nearby Royal Parks of London, Buckingham Palace Gardens is not usually open to the public. However when Buckingham Palace is open during August and September, visitors have access to part of the garden. The gardens are where the Queen's garden parties are held.

    The gardens are regularly surveyed for their moths and occasionally visited by the Queen's Swans.

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    • Arts and Culture
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Eco-Tourism

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  • ZanieOR's Profile Photo

    Flowers and bricks

    by ZanieOR Updated Feb 6, 2005

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    Flowers of June

    Favorite thing: There was so much to seen while sightseeing in London (and nearby Hampton Court) it was easy to miss the little things ... the architectural details, the unusual signs and different customs.
    When you get a chance slow down, sit down on a park bench, soak in the day, smell the roses.

    Fondest memory: I remember stopping to admire the juxtaposition of colorful flower against old brick ... a tiny, tiny symbol of the many, many lovely things in London. And the world.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Women's Travel
    • Seniors

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    Kensington Gardens

    by Travelchili Written Nov 30, 2003

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    Kensington Gardens

    Favorite thing: There are many parks and gardens in London, one of them being Kensington. During the sunny summerdays there are many people walking around the pond and feeding ducks or lying down and enjoying the weather. Just please don't leave your litter around!! It is so sad when people don't care about that:(

    What else is there to see/do in the Gardens?
    * you can have a distant views of Kensington Palace
    * see the Peter Pan statue beside the Longwater and the Elfin Oak
    * find the Diana, Princess of Wales Memorial Playground
    * walk - there is the seven-mile Memorial Walk, which continues through Hyde Park, Green Park and St James's Park

    Fondest memory: You can reach Kensington Gardens from three different tube lines:
    * Lancaster Gate (the Central Line)
    * Queensway (the Central Line)
    * High Street Kensington (Circle and District Lines)

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  • pedersdottir's Profile Photo

    An original Watergate

    by pedersdottir Updated Apr 21, 2004

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    Where have all the boatmen gone?

    Favorite thing: Standing near the western entrance to the Victoria Embankment Gardens, the Villiers Watergate is the last remaining remnant of a once-lavish London house fronting the Thames.

    The Dukes of Buckingham made their home here. Now the gate stands watch over potted palms and meandering footpaths. The waters that once lapped at these steps has been pushed away by the creation of the sewage system installed underfoot. Walking through Embankment Gardens the visitor is strolling atop a prime example of Victorian plumbing genius.

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    • Historical Travel
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • Beautiful Parks!

    by CoAir13 Written Sep 23, 2004

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    Green Park

    Favorite thing: London has some of the most beautiful parks I have ever seen. It is great to walk and walk and walk for hours.....then, be able to relax in one of these serene sanctuaries in the middle of the city!

    Fondest memory: After walking all day, going to Green Park and lounging in one of the folding chairs they have set out on the lawn!

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  • pedersdottir's Profile Photo

    Flowers and Fountains

    by pedersdottir Updated Apr 13, 2004

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    Tulips at the Bridge

    Favorite thing: Regent's Park. Oasis of calm in the rush of the city.

    With playgrounds, a boating lake, and the London Zoo, Regent's Park is the perfect place to spend a fine day in the great outdoors.

    A park-within-the park, Queen Mary's Gardens contain formal rose beds, boxwood-edged knot gardens, and a duck pond with Japanese serenity garden all within the Inner CIrcle.

    Lining the boulevards to the east and south of the Park are crescents of finely whitewashed Georgian Townhouses, surely deluxe housing for a fortunate few.

    The Park is reached via the tube, Regent's Park stop, or the #453 bus.

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    • Zoo
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Festivals

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  • LanaFromRiga's Profile Photo

    Hyde Park

    by LanaFromRiga Written Apr 4, 2005

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    Hyde Park

    Favorite thing: London’s largest (145 hectares) park. It’s a magnificent venue for open-air concerts, demonstrations and royal occasions.
    Open 5.30am-midnight, the underground station Hyde Park Corner/Marble Arch/Knightsridge/Lancastr Gate

    Fondest memory: Great place to feel like in a rural area, but in the centre of London.

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    a day in the park

    by maple_air Updated Dec 1, 2004

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    Buckingham Palace viewed from hthe park

    Fondest memory: When you want to forget the hustle and bustle of the city, and you want to just spend a few moments on your own, not to think about anything and just enjoy what that very moment has to offer to you....head out to the park. Which is just what i did one crisp november morning.....to St. James Park, just next to Buckingham Palace

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  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    Regent's Park

    by kris-t Updated Jan 9, 2011

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    Regent's Park
    3 more images

    Favorite thing: Regent's Park (officially The Regent's Park) is one of the Royal Parks of London. It is in the northern part of central London partly in the City of Westminster and partly in the London Borough of Camden.

    Fondest memory: The park has an outer ring road called the Outer Circle (4.3km) and an inner ring road called the Inner Circle, which contains the most carefully tended section of the park, Queen Mary's Gardens.

    Apart from a link road between these two, the park is reserved for pedestrians. The south, east and most of the west sides of the park are lined with elegant white stucco terraces of houses designed by John Nash. Running through the northern end of the park is Regent's Canal which connects the Grand Union Canal to the former London Docks.

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    • Eco-Tourism
    • Family Travel

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