London Local Customs

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Most Recent Local Customs in London

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    THE RED POST BOX

    by davidjo Written Nov 29, 2012

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    Red post boxes are visible all over London, and c the age can be determined quite easily as boxes with 'POST OFFICE' on them will be from before 1980 as the latter ones have 'ROYAL MAIL'on them. Another way to determine the age will be to take a look at the Royal Cypher, which will indicate the ruling monarch at the time of installation. The post box will have details on a sign showing collection times during the week. The first box was installed in 1853 and have varied in design since then. Since 1905 the boxes have mainly been made from cast iron, but there are still some post boxes from Queen Victoria era but the rarest Boxes are the ones from Edward VIII who only reigned for 11 months before abdicating (only 150 were ever made). As can be seen at the bottom Carron Company in Stirlingshire made many of the boxes.

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    THE OLD BLUE POLICE LAMP

    by davidjo Written Nov 29, 2012

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    TRADITIONAL BLUE POLICE LAMP
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    It was traditional for a blue lamp to be hung outside police stations but fewer are to be seen nowadays. They actually hung the first ones in 1861 but Queen Victoria became distressed as it reminded her of the blue room where her husband Albert died. She used to pass the Bow Street Police Station on the way to the Opera House so the police replaced it with a white light.

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    MEWS

    by davidjo Written Nov 27, 2012

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    Mews was the name given to horse and carriage stables that were located behind the main house below the living quarters where it was common to have a small alley between the rows of 17th and 18th century houses in London. Nowadays the mews have been converted into small apartments, garages or accommodation for the housemaid or other workers and the real estate price would be very high indeed. Many of the mews still have cobblestones.

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    GENTLEMEN'S CLUBS

    by davidjo Written Nov 26, 2012

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    ornate cannonballs at Calvary and Guards
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    Many Gentlemen's Clubs came into being in the 19th century and were frequented by the aristocracy who were able to gamble which was illegal in UK at the time. Each club was characterised by their member's interest such as sport, politics, literature etc. It was normal for a gentleman to belong to only one club where they would treat it as a second home and perhaps watch musical performances, play games and hang out with their friends. Most clubs you have to be invited to join and if you recommend someone there is also the possibility that other members may blackball you if they think your candidate is unacceptable. At one time their were over 400 clubs but nowadays their are only a few left, and some even open their doors to women. Famous clubs still operating are the Army and Navy Club, the Athenaeum , Brooks's, Calvary and Guards, Lansdowne Club.

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    STATUES

    by davidjo Written Nov 19, 2012

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    London is dotted all over with with statues and a within the space of 300 metres i came across 5 statues in Portland Place, but the one below didn't appear to have a plaque with a description on it. Other statues that i did see were of Quinton Hogg who was a British politician, General Vladysaw Eugeniusz Sikorski, a Polish military and political leader who led his country in exile during the 2nd world War, Joseph Lister, the British Surgeon who discovered the merits of sterilising equipment, and Field Marshall George Stuart. I personally was not aware of who all these people were, bu i is fun to research and learn about there achievements, so now i will photograph any statue for this purpose.

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    BLUE PLAQUE

    by davidjo Updated Nov 19, 2012

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    Blue Plaques are signs organised by English Heritage to commemorate a famous person who lived in the building. In just 300 metres i came across 5 of the plaques attached to buildings Portland Place. There are 850 plaques, the first of which was installed in 1867 to commemorate Lord Byron but since then the building was demolished but the oldest surviving plaque is of Napoleon 111 , also 1867.

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    BLUE PLAQUE

    by davidjo Written Nov 18, 2012

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    Blue Plaques are signs organised by English Heritage to commemorate a famous person who lived in the building. In just 300 metres i came across 5 of the plaques attached to buildings in Great Portland Street. There are 850 plaques, the first of which was installed in 1867 to commemorate Lord Byron but since then the building was demolished but the oldest surviving plaque is of Napoleon 111 , also 1867.

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    RED DOUBLE DECKER BUS

    by davidjo Written Nov 18, 2012

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    familiar site

    The red double deckers in London has become a recognised symbol on the streets, first used after the second world war. They were shorter than the single buses but could carry more passengers. Over the years newer models were designed especially to allow access for disabilities.

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    Talk to someone who knows ...

    by Jerelis Written Sep 21, 2012

    I guess we all agree on this on; there is nothing more exciting than going travelling - exploring another country, experiencing a different culture, travelling around in new ways, sampling the local cuisine and chatting to the local people for a different perspective on life.

    However during our travels we learned that there is one certain thing that you should be aware of and prepared for to make sure that the trip is as easy and enjoyable as possible. We always try to see everything once we're there, but this is not always an act of responsible travelling. We always talk to the locals and we know that they have the information about just the right spots to visit and how to undertake them. It will not only enhance your experiences but also avoid any unnecessary hassles.

    For me the travel tips I have written down in this section made the most of mine travel experience and I came home in the same happy, healthy state that I left.

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    Voltage, frequency and plug ins.

    by Jerelis Written Sep 21, 2012

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    Two round pins system.

    Maybe it sounds a bit weird, but as an experience traveler I know that you every now and then need this kind of information in advance: electricity in the United Kingdom is 230 Volts, alternating at 50 cycles per second. If you travel to England with a device that does not accept 230 Volts at 50 Hertz, you will need a voltage converter.

    There are three main types of voltage converter. Resistor-network converters will usually be advertised as supporting something like 50-1600 Watts. They are light-weight and support high-wattage electrical appliances like hair dryers and irons. However, they can only be used for short periods of time and are not ideal for digital devices. Some companies sell combination converters that include both a resistor network and a transformer in the same package. This kind of converter will usually come with a switch that switches between the two modes. If you absolutely need both types of converter, then this is the type to buy.

    Outlets in England generally accept 1 type of plug: Two round pins (see the picture). If your appliances plug has a different shape, you may need a plug adapter. Depending on how much you plan to travel in the future, it may be worthwhile to get a combination voltage converter and plug adapter.

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    THE LONDON CAB

    by balhannah Written Sep 7, 2012

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    Seeing the London Cabs travelling in droves along the streets of London, well, it brought a smile to my face!
    Just like in the movies, there are dozens of them lined up behind each other, all in a hurry, that is, if the traffic jams let them!
    No longer all Black, these days, they are all colours.

    I was interested in them, and wondered why they are named the "Hackney Carriage."
    This name refers to a taxicab licensed by the Public Carriage Office in Greater London or by the local authority.
    Up until 1947, Hackney carriages were a two-wheeled, one-horse hackney vehicle called a Noddy, then cars replaced horse-drawn carriages.

    Have you ever been in a Taxi where the driver doesn't know where he is going?
    In London, hackney-carriage drivers have to pass a test called "The Knowledge," so they know the London streets, important buildings etc., receiving a yellow badge for the suburban areas and a green one for all of London. Those who have just passed the "knowledge" are known as 'butter boys'
    Somehow, I think they still get lost!

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    LONDON CITY

    by balhannah Written Sep 6, 2012

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    London City

    The City of London is an area of London that has remained almost unchanged since the Middle Ages. It is now only a tiny part of the metropolis.

    My photo is of a boundary marker I saw. I thought it quite impressive to our signs at home, that is all they are, but here, St. George's Dragon was on the post, spitting fire and holding the St. George shield.

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  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    British cuisine - Steak and kidney pie

    by kris-t Written Jun 24, 2012

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    My Steak and kidney pie
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    An other sentative dish of British cuisine - Steak and kidney pie (other names: Kate and Sidney pie, snake and kiddy pie, and snake and pygmy pie).

    Rich meat and kidney filling and light golden pastry makes Steak and kidney pie a British favorite.

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    British cuisine - Christmas pudding

    by kris-t Updated Jun 24, 2012

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    My Christmas pudding

    It's interesting that originally the pudding was designed as a method of preserving meat in the early 15th century!

    The ingredients of today are very different to what was originally used in medieval England and also are very different from family to family.

    My Husband's family use to make pudding with prunes, potatoes, carots and lots of suggar. I prefer more complicated recipe with cooking time about 8-10 hrs.

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    British cuisine

    by kris-t Updated Jun 24, 2012

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    London, England
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    Starting tip about British cuisine I can not get rid of the wish to quote phrase from "Pourot"
    movie - "British don't have cuisine, they have a meal"... But don't they really?

    Let see: English cuisine, Scottish cuisine, Welsh cuisine....
    I think this definition of British cuisine is quite right: "unfussy dishes made with quality local ingredients, matched with simple sauces to accentuate flavour, rather than disguise it".

    British dishes: fish and chips, the Sunday roast, steak and kidney pie, and bangers and mash, Cheshire cheese, the Yorkshire pudding, Arbroath Smokie, and Welsh cakes.

    Also at Christmas time the traditional Christmas pudding in this list.

    We wount forget also that the custom of afternoon tea and scones has its origins in Imperial Britain.

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London Local Customs

leics's Profile Photo

Local customs in London?  To be honest, the visitor will never learn them all. From standing on the right on a Tube (Underground / Metro / subway) escalator to knowing that a black taxi...

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