London Off The Beaten Path

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Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in London

  • Galaxy31's Profile Photo

    A Day at the Olympic Park

    by Galaxy31 Written Nov 10, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I have decided to visit the Orbit at the Olympic Park couple of weeks ago and see what the park has to offer.
    This was my first visit and I didn't know what to expect but it was a pleasant ride through the park and glad that I have visited.
    As I cycle there I got to say that signs are not existence from CS2 (Cycle Super highway 2 route) where you need to turn into the park and I have ended cycling for another mile around it until I have found the entrance.
    Except from walking through the park and discovering what it has to offer it was good to see that cycling its allowed in the park.
    There were about three cabin cafes but not with a seating area, a lot of climbing frames and water fountains for children.
    They do tend to have free events going on for adults and children which were free when I went and I wished I had more time to attend one of them which it looked interesting and it was called Newton’s Cottage free events. This is their website www.newtonscottage.org but I still got time to attend at least one of them.
    Its worth a visit and its free.

    Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park
    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Cycling
    • Family Travel

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    Fairlop Oak Pub

    by cleocat Written Nov 6, 2014

    Barkingside is a residential area about 40 min outside central London. Not much around for sightseeing, but if you happen to be in the area, visit the Fairlop Oak pub. Prices are easily half or even less of what you would pay in London. Good old family pub with a great British atmosphere.

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    Open House London 2014 in Hackney.

    by HackneyBird Written Sep 17, 2014

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    Here is a full list of Hackney venues involved in Open House London 2014.

    * 30 Crown Place, EC2A
    * Rivington Place, EC2A
    * Village Underground, EC2A
    * Camera Obscura, E1
    * Adelaide Wharf, E2
    * Bridge Academy, E2
    * Haggerston School, E2
    * Restored Historic Almshouse at the Geffrye Museum, E2
    * Self-built Straw Bale Building, Hackney City Farm, E2
    * Clapton Girls Academy, E5
    * Redundant Architects Recreation Association, E5
    * Round Chapel, E5
    * Arcola Theatre, E5
    * Dalston CLR James Library & Hackney Archives, E8
    * Dalston Eastern Curve Garden, E8
    * Levitt Bernstein Studio, E8
    * Hackney Empire, E8
    * Oto Projects, E8
    * St Barnabas Mission Hall & Church, E8
    * St Augustine's Tower, E8
    * Writer's Shed, E8
    * 51 Southborough Road, E9
    * Cardinal Pole Catholic School, E9
    * Gingerbread House, E9
    * Hackney Marshes Centre, E9
    * Lauriston School, E9
    * Sutton House, E9
    * 52 Whitmore Road, N11
    * Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation, N1
    * Free Speace Wenlock Barn Estate, N1
    * Kingsland Basin Moorings, N1
    * National Centre for Circus Arts, N1
    * Castle Climbing Centre, N4
    * Clissold House, N16
    * Clissold Park, N16
    * Clonbrock Road, N16
    * Garden School Hackney, N16
    * Growing Communities Eco Classroom, n16
    * Our Lady's Convent High School, N16
    * St Mary's Old Church, N16
    * Stoke Newington School, N16
    * The Studio, N16
    * Waddington Studios,N16

    WALKS/TALKS/TOURS

    * From Brownfield to Greenfields: A Walking Tour, EC2A
    * Further Beyond the Olympic Park: North to Walthamstow Wetlands, E5
    * Further Beyond the Olympic Park: South to the Thames, E9
    * The Floating Cinema: The International Village Shop Workshop and Tour, E9
    * Woodbury Wetlands: Hidden Nature Reserve in Stoke Newington, N4
    * Hackney's Timber Buildings: walking tour, N1

    Hackney Empire, E8 C L R James Library & Hackney Archives, E8 St Augustine's Tower, E8 Geffrye Musuem, E2
    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

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    Walthamstow Market

    by Galaxy31 Updated Sep 16, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Walthamstow market it’s the longest but not the largest market in England and maybe in Europe.
    Its cover over a kilometre long and it has begun trading in 1885. It has over 500 stalls selling fruit, vegetables, flowers, clothes and much more.
    On each side of the market you will find High Street chain stores and independent small shops also lots of cafes, fast food outlets and pubs.
    What it was a very nice idea it was the seating areas that they have created between the stalls with tables
    by the coffee houses. It was nice to sit down and relax in the middle of the market.
    The market it’s open from Tuesday to Saturday and on a Saturdays in the square of the market it’s the French market.
    The market it has still got that cockney feel into it.
    Nearest Station: Walthmstow Central Station or St James Street railway.

    Walthamstow market Walthamstow market Walthamstow market
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
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    GEFFRYE PERIOD GARDENS

    by Galaxy31 Updated Sep 16, 2014

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    On the right hand side of the museum and after you go through the burial grounds you enter first the herb garden with its in 12 bed sections and herbs that have the same common use are grouped together. They are medicinal, cosmetic, household, dye plants, culinary and aromatic herbs and a few of them are poisonous and harmful if they are eaten. At the entrance of the herb garden you will see the place where the time capsule it’s laid and in the middle there is a fountain.

    The rest of the garden it’s section in four different gardens that represents the periods from the 17th century to 20th century and each garden has got it’s unique design and flowers to reflect that.
    You will find rosemary, bay, camomile, honeysuckle, hibiscus, passion flowers, figs, yew, climbing pear tree, roses tulips and many more.
    The period gardens at Geffrye museums are free to attend but are open only between April and October.

    Geffrye museum garden Geffrye museum garden Geffrye museum garden Geffrye museum garden Geffrye museum garden
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    Inside of a 19th Century Almhouse

    by Galaxy31 Updated Sep 16, 2014

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    These tips I have copied and paste from my 18th century tip.
    When you go into the 19th century room you can see the difference in their living accommodation.
    They had more of a luxury items such as oil lamps instead of candles, frames and pictures on their mantelpieces and dried flowers around the rooms.

    In 2002 Geffrey museum has restored couple of almshouses and off I went to see them and I’m wasn't disappointed. The 18th century almshouse it was on the ground floor and the 19th century on the first floor.
    The almshouses were occupied by poor pensioners and they have been build to house the poor and needy.
    All together were 14 almshouses with 50 residences and back in 18 and 19th century you would have entered the front door and you would have a room on each side with the staircase in front of you to the first floor landing with identical rooms, the cupboards under the staircase it was used as storage and their wash room and fuel storage were in the basement.
    The museum has created these two rooms with so many details that it does take you years back.
    The room had a floral bedspread with a lot of frames and a clock on the mantelpiece, an armchair and the oil lamps were burning on each side of the fireplace.
    The buildings are Grade I listing and they have their original fixtures like the staircase, panelling and closets.

    Photography it’s allowed for own use but not tripods are allowed.
    The nearest station it’s Hoxton on the over ground.
    Visiting times: Saturdays: **20 September, 4 October, 1 November and 6 December 2014
    Tuesdays: 14 and 28 October, 11 and 25 November and 9 December 2014
    Wednesdays: 17 September, 1 and 15 October, 5 and 19 November and 3 and 17 December 2014 Timed entries are at 11am, 12pm, 2pm and 3pm, with additional 4pm tours from April - October.
    The entry price its £3.00 per person.
    It's free to go on Open House weekend.

    19th Century Almhouse 19th Century Almhouse 19th Century Almhouse 19th Century Almhouse 19th Century Almhouse
    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

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    inside of an 18th Century Almhouse

    by Galaxy31 Updated Sep 16, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In 2002 Geffrey museum has restored couple of almshouses and off I went to see them and I’m wasn't disappointed. The 18th century almshouse it was on the ground floor and the 19th century on the first floor.
    The almshouses were occupied by poor pensioners and they have been build to house the poor and needy.
    All together were 14 almshouses with 50 residences and back in 18 and 19th century you would have entered the front door and you would have a room on each side with the staircase in front of you to the first floor landing with identical rooms, the cupboards under the staircase it was used as storage and their wash room and fuel storage were in the basement.
    The museum has created these two rooms with so many details that it does take you years back. The room had a single bed with a plain blanket, a dresser, a small dining table with a couple of chairs and a fireplace. Back then the cooking was done on the open fireplace in the room.
    The buildings are Grade I listing and they have their original fixtures like the staircase, panelling and closets.
    I will love to go back around Christmas time just to get the feel of the place.
    Photography it’s allowed for own use but not tripods are allowed.
    The nearest station it’s Hoxton on the over ground.
    Visiting times:Saturdays: **20 September, 4 October, 1 November and 6 December 2014
    Tuesdays: 14 and 28 October, 11 and 25 November and 9 December 201
    Wednesdays: 17 September, 1 and 15 October, 5 and 19 November and 3 and 17 December 2014 Timed entries are at 11am, 12pm, 2pm and 3pm, with additional 4pm tours from April - October.
    The entry price it's £3.00 a person.

    18th Century Almhouse 18th Century Almhouse 18th Century Almhouse 18th Century Almhouse 18th Century Almhouse
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

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    Thames Barrier Park

    by Galaxy31 Written Sep 11, 2014

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    The Park it has a very unsual design but it's a pleasure to walk through it and children love to play around the hedges.From the top you can see the hedges forming a beautiful design with their curves and the wildflowers growing around them.
    At the end of the park you can see the Thames Barrier and on the side theres a large space for picnics and a water fountain.
    The Thames Barrier Park it's on the north bank side of the Thames and it was opened in 2000 on a 22 acres derelict land and it was designed by Patel Taylor.

    Nearest Station Pontoon Dock on DLR

    Thames Barrier Park Thames Barrier Park Thames Barrier Park Thames Barrier Park
    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking

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    Pleasure Garden Festival

    by Galaxy31 Written Sep 11, 2014

    I love festivals and every opportunity I find I'm there from music events to street entertainment I just love the buzz of it.
    This festival was by the Thames next to Pleasure Gardens. It was a family oriented festival but it had a bit of everything for everybody. There was food stalls from noodle bar to burgers & ice cream even an afternoon tea by the river.
    Most of the street festivals in London are free and it's a great way of spending time if you are on a tight budget.

    Pleasure Garden Festival Pleasure Garden Festival Pleasure Garden Festival Pleasure Garden Festival Pleasure Garden Festival
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    • Festivals

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  • arturowan's Profile Photo

    3 Abbey Road...

    by arturowan Written Sep 10, 2014

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    3 Abbey Road is the iconic recording studio which has made the thoroughfare of that name, along where it is located, a centre of pilgrimage for music fans from all over the world...
    Both the Abbey Road NW8 street sign, & the wall ouside the actual studio, are scrawled with the names & messages of those who have made the journey especially to see where a favourite album of theirs was recorded...
    Abbey Road posesses the most famous pedestrian crossing in Britain, immortalised for all time on The Beatles album of that name - a photo that has been mimicked countless times since the iconic shot was taken in 1969
    The history of recording at 3 Abbey Road began in November 1931, when the Georgian townhouse, as it then still was, was aquired by the Gramophone Company, the predecessor of EMI - who would own it until 2012
    0riginally used for the recording of symphonic music, the popular history of Abbey Road began in 1958, when Cliff Richard & The Drifters, recorded Move It, in Studio 2
    This was not the same band as The Shadows, with whom Cliff subsequently became a star, but The Shadows did go there in order to record their Live At Abbey Road album...
    However, as far as making Abbey Road a name in itself, was the period from 1962-1970 when The Beatles recorded there entire studio sequence of albums on site...
    It was not until 1970 that EMI decided to promote their main London studio, in association with their best-selling band, by naming it Abbey Road Studios...
    From 1970, after the break-up of The Beatles, the band that tookover & became associated with making innovative use of the studios, was Pink Floyd...
    I will not itemise all the bands & singers who have utilised the recording studio at Abbey Road over the decades, but anybody reading this will be sure to have their favourites, in order to understand why those such as Paul McCartney, were shocked when EMI announced they had no further use for this shrine-of-homage, due to a business decision in 2012
    In order to prevent its decades of history being destroyed & desecrated by property developers, 3 Abbey Road was made an English Heritage Grade 2 Listed building by the British government...
    Located in Saint John's Wood, central London, between Hill Road & Garden Road, 3 Abbey Road demonstrates how a location can become a tourist centre without any official attempt to make it so - it is an iconic place which stands for 'people power' & the spirit of Rock'n'Roll...
    Postcode = NW8 9AY

    A place of pilgrimage...
    Related to:
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    • Arts and Culture
    • Music

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    House of Shattering Glass...

    by arturowan Written Sep 9, 2014

    1 Lansdowne House was converted into a recording studio & office in 1957
    The conversion of the former residential property was done by Dennis Preston, with the help of engineer, Adrian Kerridge, to the specification of record producer, Joe Meek (see separate tip...)
    The original design was built for William Flodthart, a benelovent South African diamond tycoon, who wanted to create a live-in studio for aspiring artists...
    The design included a squash court, whcih was converted into the recording studio, & a smokers room, which became the control studio...
    As a studio, Lansdowne House influenced the course of popular music as soon as it was opened, when Joe Meek engineered Lonnie Donegan's, Cumberland Gap...
    Lonnie Donegan spearheaded the Skiffle Revolution with this single, which went to #1 in the Hit Parade in 1957
    Skiffle was the punk-rock of its era, which required minimal outlay on instruments, & teenagers who took up playing in this style, included The Beatles...
    Joe Meek would leave Lansdowne House in 1960 - setting up his personal studio in the far less user-friendly set-up at the now notorious, 304 Holloway Road - a move that would ultimately prove tragic...
    Lansdowne House became EMI's alternative studio to their hallowed Abbey Road...
    Although no other London studio can quite compare to the 1 that The Beatles made an album title out of, Landsdowne House, nonetheless, amassed an impressive recording clientele, including;
    Acker Bilk
    Animals
    Art Garfunkel
    Bryan Ferry
    David Essex
    Gerry Rafferty
    Joe Brown
    Marianne Faithfull
    Marty Wilde
    Rod Stewart
    Steve Harley (& Cockney Rebel)
    Uriah Heep
    EMI carried out a major upgrade of the recording equipment at Lansdowne House in 1967, replacing the valve technology originally installed, with 8-track machines...
    The House 0f Shattering Glass, as the studio became known, because of its outstanding acoustics, was closed for commercial purposes in 2006
    It has now returned to its obvious use, as apartments...
    Postcode = W11 3LP

    Lansdowne House...
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    304 Holloway Road...

    by arturowan Written Sep 5, 2014

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    304 Holloway Road was the home studio of recording pioneer, Joe Meek...
    Converted from a standard 3-room apartment, Meek moved in his own design of recording equipment, & not only persevered against the poor acoustics, but also his downstairs landlord banging the ceiling with a broom, when he made too much noise!
    Meek's response was to move a loudspeaker onto the stairwell, & increase the volume...
    His first chart hit recorded at that address, went all the way to #1 for John Leyton, in 1961
    Johnny Remember Me - a melodramatic ballad about a tragic love, written by Meek's psychic friend, Geoff Goddard...
    Meek himself was obsessive about anything 'occult', believeing he was in contact with the spirit of Buddy Holly, he kept a ouija board at 304 Holloway Road, to attempt psychic communication...
    Meek posessed a paranoid & depressive personality, & when he received a transcontinental call from producer Phil Spector, he accused the Californian of spying on him...
    (Interestingly, fellow record producer, Brian Wilson, would also develop a similar paranoia & mental illness, focused on Spector, around the same time...)
    As Meek was gay, there was some cause for his paranoia, as this was still against the law in UK at the time, it is thought he might have been being blackmailed by those in the know...
    As the pop hits ceased, Meek drifted into financial difficulties, & was threatened with a lawsuit for plagiarism, by French composer, Jean Ledrut, who claimed he had actually written Joe's solo hit; Telstar...
    In a fit of depressive panic, Joe Meek loaded a shotgun he had confiscated from his former protege & Tornados' bassist, Heinz Burt, (who had enjoyed a solo Meek-produced hit; Just Like Eddie...
    Meek killed his landlady, Violet Shenton, then turned the gun on himself...)
    3 weeks after his burial, the court considering the case of plagiarism against him, ruled in Meek's favour, but he had never received any royalties from his own hit, because of the legal wrangle...
    There is no doubt that Meek's electronic production effects, were light years ahead of their time, & were not realised again, until George Martin's work with The Beatles, & Brian Eno with ROXY MUSIC...
    Visitors to his former address in Islington can find an unofficial 'black plaque', dedicated to Meek's achievemnets there...
    It is unlikely that Joe Meek's former studio will ever achieve official 'blue plaque' status, because of his violent final acts...

    Period news report... Joe Meek in his studio... 304 Holloway Road, Islington... Police attend the crime scene...
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    • Arts and Culture
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  • Anjuschka's Profile Photo

    Exhibition Rd - A great place with eateries...

    by Anjuschka Written Sep 2, 2014

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    One day I came along Cromwell Rd right from the Hyde Park area.
    I was walking around and intended to go to South Kensington Station.

    At Exhibition Rd you find little cafés & restaurants and it is situated near
    South Kensington Tube Station.

    It's a charming place where you might find something to eat with your favourite foods.

    The place is surrounded by Thurloe Pl, Thurloe Square.

    Nearby on the way to the Tube station you also will be able to rent a bike at a Barclay Bycicle Hire point. There are a few more little cafès to find.

    Here are a few of them:
    *The Kensington Creperie: http://www.kensingtoncreperie.com/
    *Greenfields Cafe
    *Casa Brindisa
    *Le Pain Quotidien: http://www.lepainquotidien.co.uk/
    *PAUL South Kensington: http://www.paul-uk.com/
    *Sole Luna Pizza & Pasta: http://www.soleluna.co.uk/
    *Oriental Canteen

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  • jonathanbarker's Profile Photo

    Stockwell, a quiet suburb

    by jonathanbarker Updated Sep 1, 2014

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    On Saturday 30th August 2014 I was invited to attend a gig/EP launch by a Folk trio called JAMsharp in a pub/venue in Stockwell. I travelled by train from Reading to Vauxhall and then walked about a mile to Stockwell. I had some time to explore the centre of Stockwell. I saw the Stockwell War Memorial which has been tastefully decorated with murals dedicated to heroes of the two world wars, including Violette Szabo, a lady from Stockwell who was working for the British espionage organisation (SOE). Sadly she was executed at the Ravensbruck camp in Germany. However in 1958 a film based on a book "Carve her name with pride" was made starring the British actress Virginia McKenna. Another mural shows poppies. In the same square there is a statue of the Bronze woman, a negro woman holding up a baby. In this area there are plenty of independent shops, pubs and cafes.

    The Violette Szabo mural The Bronze woman statue Poppies mural Stockwell Clock Tower
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    Regent Street by BUS - walking takes you faster...

    by Anjuschka Updated Aug 30, 2014

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    You even could name any other London shopping streets...

    When I went by bus from Camden Town to Victoria Station (with lots of shopping goods!) I came across the Regent Street.
    I usually passing it on foot - but that day I kind of enjoyed the view from the bus.

    YOU PROBABLY WILL BE FASTER ON FOOT WALKING FORTH AND BACK!!!
    IF THERE WEREN'T THAT MUCH PEDESTRIANS!!! :D

    Stuck on a BUS on a busy London street could be very annoying.
    My luck was - I was on my way back to my accomodation and just "relaxed" going on bus...

    I went on the fron seats on adouble decker bus to enjoy the view properly.

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London Off The Beaten Path

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There are many well-beaten paths in London as befits one of the major travel destinations in the world, but that is not the whole story.  Visitors may well visit Buckingham Palace,  the...

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