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  • Foyles Book Store, Central London
    Foyles Book Store, Central London
    by spidermiss
  • Foyles Book Store, Central London
    Foyles Book Store, Central London
    by spidermiss
  • Foyles Book Store, Central London
    Foyles Book Store, Central London
    by spidermiss
  • marsistanbul's Profile Photo

    STANFORDS: The world's largest map&travel book store

    by marsistanbul Updated Apr 16, 2008

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Stanfords in Covent Garden is Stanford's main store,situated on Long Acre.
    Their Motto is Explore-Discover-Inspire.
    Stanfords is an other amazing place to visit in London and I'm never ever being boring when I be there,always exciting and cheerful..
    Very refine maps&Atlases,guide ,travel books,writing&other literature,globes,walking-trekking books,detailed road maps of hundreds countries,and cities..walking and trekking accessories..
    Do you want to walk Himalayas or San Gimignano or Nepal..first you should come and visit Stanfords..It gives you amazing inspiration..
    opening hours, 9.ooam-7.30pm
    sat: 10.ooam-7.oopm
    sun:12.oo noon-6.oopm

    What to buy: Stanfords stocks a great range of trekking maps and guides for walking of all levels in destinations all over the world and some useful trek kit too..GPS accessories,software units..
    waterproof small phone just 17.99 pound
    London mini map 1.95 pound-it is the best seller:)
    Inca trail-Machu Picchu map 7.95 pound
    And,what I bought.. Clare Jones's "Unforgettable things to do before you die" 18.99 pound
    The Motto is simple Explore-Discover and Inspire...

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

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  • tvor's Profile Photo

    Foyles Bookshop: Everything you want in a bookstore

    by tvor Updated Apr 2, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Foyles is over 100 years old and is still privately owned. This in itself lends to a unique feel, instead of the usual national chain stores selling books to the masses. There are five floors of books, an art gallery, cafe, lifts and air conditioning! There are many specialist subjects available as well as gifts, stationery.

    They are open late six days a week and open on Sundays until 8. The main store is on Charing Cross Road and there is now a branch in the Royal Festival Hall.

    Also check out Silvermoon, a specialist area for women's books and interests. There's a link off the main website to their section with online book shopping there as well.

    What to buy: Books, gifts

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  • Spincat's Profile Photo

    Bookseller Crow on the Hill: Best South East London Bookshop

    by Spincat Updated Feb 9, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Independent bookshops in London are having a bad time (surprise).
    Yes, Amazon and the knock-down prices in supermarkets & big chains like Borders.
    Bookseller Crow on the Hill's blog describes how customers will browse for ages in the shop and depart with a blatant ' I'm going to order from Amazon'. However, this place remains in business and Time Out described it "as one of the best.

    The shop has an amazing selection for its size and the owners and staff can suggest what you are looking for from just a snippet : "It's that book about a murder.. they find a dead body;" "I think it has a sort of red cover and the author's name begins with an M;" "It's the latest one by whatisname."

    They stock a wide range of independently published books too, titles you may never see anywhere else: i recommend 'Lonely Werewolf Girl' by Martin Millar (though I hope that one is widely known elsewhere). They also introduced me to one of the best (funny/poignant) books I have read for a long time 'What was Lost' by Catherine O'Flynn.

    They sell a small selection of gifts, like T-shirts ("667 the neighbour of the beast") and cards. Always good music playing ... well, almost always.

    They are based in Crystal Palace, a great part of South east London for a day out. Lots of good small shops, cafes and restaurants, almost no chain stores - and a lovely park to explore.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

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  • mollymoo0oo0's Profile Photo

    Waterstone's Piccadilly: Books, more books, and still so much more!!

    by mollymoo0oo0 Updated Nov 8, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Waterstones is a chain of bookshops, with Piccadilly as its flagship store.

    Apart from being my favourite bookshop, it is also HUGE with a fantastic travel section which gets it's own mezzanine and has a very cosy big leather sofa for sitting down to peruse the squillions of great travel/language books.

    There are also many lectures and events that take place here (see website for details).

    And as if that isn't enough to whet your appetites... there's a double bonus:
    ... there's an extra fantastic fruit and veg smoothie bar on the top floor! .....if you don't do smoothies, there's a cafe in the basement, and if you MUST have alcyhol, checkout the groovy cocktails in the bar somewhere upstairs (5th floor)... it has a really nice view across london too!!

    What to buy: books, magazines, smoothies....

    What to pay: whatever your budget, there will be something in here for you...

    Related to:
    • Study Abroad
    • Arts and Culture

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  • mollymoo0oo0's Profile Photo

    Stanfords bookshop: Map your travels all over the w0rld!!

    by mollymoo0oo0 Updated Nov 8, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In their own words, 'Stanfords is the UK’s leading specialist retailer of maps, travel books and other travel accessories, having been established in 1853 by Edward Stanford. Our flagship store in Covent Garden, London, first opened its doors in January 1901 and can justly claim to offer the world’s largest stock of maps and travel books under one roof. '

    I love this place!! Stacked full of books, maps and much more for the traveller, travel-lover or dreamer about the w0rld we live in...

    What to buy: You can buy maps of all kinds for all over the w0rld, and I've used it for buying many a city map before wandering off on an adventure somewhere (saving time and money when I arrive!)

    Also there are plenty of other travel memorabilia here, and it's fantastic for gifts for a fellow lover of travel :)

    What to pay: Varies... prices are average, it's the quality of service and range of goods that excel here!

    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Study Abroad
    • Budget Travel

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  • Sjalen's Profile Photo

    Books for Cooks: Cook your way through the World

    by Sjalen Written May 2, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A shop with cook books from all over the World is heaven for anyone who likes food. Sections are divided by country, and now I'm not just talking France, Italy, India and so on, I'm talking Portugal, Sweden, Argentina, Indonesia and all the rest even if the major cuisines are over represented compared to more exotic ones. There is also a categorising by food type so you will find veggie books, breakfast books, whisky books, cooking with children and much more. On top of this, they have a small kitchen where they try dishes out and where you can rest your feet (something you can also do in the cosy sofa in the middle of the shop) with a bite of something. They also run cookery classes so it is worth checking their webpage to see what's going on if you are interested.

    What to buy: Well...I got a collection of Central European food so now I've got that Sauerbrat recipe and those Hungarian desserts :)

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining
    • Arts and Culture

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  • Sjalen's Profile Photo

    The Travel Bookshop: The ultimate VT shop!

    by Sjalen Written May 2, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This must surely be on any VT member's agenda when in London. Not for its featuring in a certain Notting Hill movie but for its content. Shelf upon shelf full of books all about travels :) I'm in heaven when I enter even if I get serious problems with indecisiveness and never buy more than the odd book. They've got lots of the stuff you're looking for, and lots that you never knew you wanted but simply have to have, such as guides to London's odd corners, British traditions, travelogues from far off corners of the former Soviet and more serious things such as books on poverty stricken regions of Africa. Wherever you want to go in the World, there will be something about it here, and you will also get those coffee table books you might want to splash out for, with the gorgeous photos of Italy you love, as well as childrens travel books with stickers of flags and so on.

    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Religious Travel
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

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  • Jenniflower's Profile Photo

    Wesley Owen: Christian Book Store and Gifts

    by Jenniflower Updated Apr 9, 2007

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    There are not many Christan book shops in London, Central or Greater London.

    I think we are spoilt in South Africa, where there are usually about two Christian book shops in each mall! And there are loads of malls!

    The Kingston branch is a small book shop, and does carry a lot of stock.

    What to buy: They stock all kinds of reading material, Bibles, music, stationery, some gifts etc.

    Their children's section is nice in that the puzzles and books are interactive sometimes.

    Lovely for the little ones!

    What to pay: Prices are average toward expensive.

    Related to:
    • Seniors
    • Religious Travel
    • Women's Travel

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  • Foyles: Foyles

    by mke1963 Updated Mar 27, 2007

    Foyles is a London institution, and is the biggest bookshop in the city.
    Extending over four floors (at least? I always run out of money by the time I get to the second floor)
    Not so long ago, Foyles had a reputation for being one of the worst places to find books. The whole place was a disorganised mess, and the joke was that the place was staffed by Albanian foreign-language studies, living in London to learn Urdu.
    Today, the staff are just as likely to be Albanian, but the service is excellent and friendly and the whole place has been brightened up and reordered so it is fairly straighforward to find what you want.

    A little known fact is that Foyles also runs an airline.

    Some miss the good old days, but it's just so much easier to find what you want. If you want crap service and total retail disorganisation, head for the Friendship Store in Beijing instead.

    What to buy: Books. If it isn't in Foyles, it's probably not available new in London (but you may have luck in one of the many second-hand bookstores further down the road!)

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  • Manara's Profile Photo

    Foyles: Like a dear old friend

    by Manara Updated Mar 12, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The first time I went to Foyles I was a student who had just finished her first year at university. I immediately fell in love with this bookstore. The ground floor was just a big bookshop like many others, but when I moved to the upper floors to look for specific subjects I found there the same atmosphere and even the smell of university libraries. The shop has changed a lot in the last few years, it looks more up-to-date now, it has a cafe, a gallery ... but what really matters to me is that it still has its five floors packed with books!
    My love has been constant, during all these years, and I have paid a visit to Foyles on each and every trip to London.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Business Travel
    • Study Abroad

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  • Muarrij's Profile Photo

    Foyles Book Shop: Traditional English Book Shop

    by Muarrij Written Jan 9, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Foyles was founded in 1903 by two brothers: when William and Gilbert Foyle failed their Civil Service examinations, they decided to sell their textbooks. Such was the response to their advert that they could have sold them many times over, so they determined to start a bookshop. The unwanted textbooks became the modest foundation stone of what was to become the world’s greatest bookshop. The business has been on Charing Cross Road since 1906 and is still privately owned.

    What to buy: The bookshop has a vast selection of books and the service is personal. I do not frequent this shop as much as I used to, as its much easier to order online these days, nonetheless I thoroughly recommend visiting it just for the buzz. Charing Cross road also has many other privately owned bookshops some even offering discounted second hand books.

    What to pay: The prices here are quite reasonable.

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  • nomadig's Profile Photo

    Soho's Original Bookshop: Centrally located bargain books

    by nomadig Updated Dec 10, 2006

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Soho's Original Bookstore on Brewer Street in Soho

    Soho's Original Bookshop is a chain of small bookstores that sells leftovers and other bargainly priced books on the groundfloor and has an adult store on the basement. Their original store is located on Brewer Street, in middle of busy Soho. The neighbourhood might be a bit too much in the most pure purists, but rest assured that it is a safe enough area.

    The bookstore has books from various genres, including art, fashion, fiction, style and travel. The selection is not huge, and the prices are not that bargained, but sometimes you can make real finds there. I, for example, have bought several Iain Banks books from this specific store with unbeatable prices.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Budget Travel

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  • nomadig's Profile Photo

    Waterstone's: The Europe's biggest bookstore

    by nomadig Written Dec 2, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Waterstone's at Piccadilly, London

    Waterstone's at Piccadilly is the seventh heaven for any bibliophile. Seven floors, filled with books that deal almost with any subject published on Earth, makes the bookstore the biggest on Europe. The location of the store couldn't be better, it's a couple hundred meters off Piccadilly Circus, nearby giant HMV and Virgin.

    Fiction, including sci-fi and mystery, is well presented on the aisles. The newest of the new are available right after the entrance for easier selection. Several floors are dedicated to non-fiction books, such as computing, business management, self-help and others. The basement floor has an excellent magazine selection.

    There is a lounge bar on the upper floors that has nice views over London rooftops. It's an excellent place to savour some coffee and study the purchased books.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

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  • BluBluBlu's Profile Photo

    Foyles: Books, books, books...

    by BluBluBlu Updated Nov 9, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    There are tons of book shops in London, from small specialists to the big chains like Waterstones. Personally I prefer Foyles. In the last few years it has been refitted and, they've introduced some extra elements . Inside you'll find a cafe, an art gallery, themed events and even a jazz music shop!

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  • nomadig's Profile Photo

    Lovejoys: Bargain books

    by nomadig Written Nov 6, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Lovejoys on Charing Cross Road in London

    When you are looking for decent prices on books, Lovejoys Book Shop on the end of Old Compton Street is a good destination. The small bookshop has several shelves of books with moderate pricetags. Some of the books are in a bit crummy shape, and some seem to be standing on shelves for half a decade or more -- but they might still be a good deal.

    The service is non-existent, but fortunately the books are easy to find and the cashier accept payments. Note that the shop doubles in the basement.

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