Bloomsbury, London

4.5 out of 5 stars 19 Reviews

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  • Bloomsbury
    by TexasDave
  • Entrance to the Foundling Museum
    Entrance to the Foundling Museum
    by davido7236
  • Bloomsbury
    by DUNK67
  • CatherineReichardt's Profile Photo

    Jeremy Bentham: a study in how NOT to mummify!

    by CatherineReichardt Updated Jun 1, 2012

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    Many tourists in London travel to the Bloomsbury area to see the Egyptian mummies at the British Museum, but few realise that only a few blocks away, lurks a homegrown - and rather less successful - mummy.

    University College London (UCL) - my alma mater - is the third oldest university in England, and is closely associated with the famous 18th century author and philanthropist Jeremy Bentham. Bentham was a strong advocate of broadening access to education, and was one of the original shareholders who financed the establishment of the University of London (the first college of which was UCL) in 1826. The establishment of the University of London was hugely significant because it created a secular alternative to the religiously affiliated colleges of Oxford and Cambridge universities, thus making university education available to non-Anglican groups such as Dissenters, Catholics and Jews for the first time.

    Bentham's somewhat ghoulish wish was that his body be publically dissected after his death. Afterwards, his head was mummified and displayed with an 'auto icon'- essentially his skeleton padded with straw and dressed in one of his own outfits - which was subsequently put on display in a wooden, glassfronted case that still stands in the College's South Cloisters .

    However, over the years, it became clear that 18th century British scientists had a thing or two to learn from their Egyptian forebears, and the mummification resulted in a leathery-looking brown lump with bulging eyes. The decision was taken to sculpt a more aesthetically pleasing wax head, complete with some of Bentham's hair (presumably to lend some authenticity?) which now sits on the autoicon.

    When I was a student, the mummified head was displayed in the glass case along with the wax-topped auto icon. I am a suggestible soul, and I will readily confess that if I was in the College towards nightfall when the Cloisters were quiet, I would avert my gaze and speed past as fast as possible without breaking into an unseemly sprint. However, having been stolen once to many by rival colleges, the mummified head is now securely locked away from public view and only the auto icon remains on display.

    According to Wikipedia, on the "100th and 150th anniversaries of the college, it [the mummified head] was brought to the meeting of the College Council, where it was listed as "present but not voting". Having subsequently spent a number of years lecturing at a university elsewhere, which taught me a thing or two about the eccentric world of academia, this assertion sounds just bizarre enough for it to be true!

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    Bloomsbury

    by Kap2 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Gandhi in Tavistock Square

    This is a place to wander around, the cerebal part of London... lots of squares and the less square....

    In the heart of London, it is centre of the intellectual past and present, highlights

    include

    Russell Square
    Tavistock Square
    Bloomsbury Theatre
    RADA
    Senate House
    Russell Hotel
    Woburn Walk

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    Church of Saint George

    by MM212 Updated Nov 9, 2009

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    Inspired by the Mausoleum of Mausolus
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    Located in the Bloomsbury area in London, the Church of Saint George is quite peculiar with its Neoclassical façade and pyramidal tower. It was built in 1730 by the architect, Nicholas Hawksmoor, a student of Sir Christopher Wren (designer of Saint Paul's Cathedral). It is said that the impressive Neoclassical front portico of the church was modelled after the Temple of Bacchus in Baalbek, Lebanon, while the step tower was inspired by the Tomb of Mausolus at Halicarnassus (located near Bodrum, Turkey). Both are symbols of the ancient pagan past, but in a Christian place of worship! The tower contains sculptures of the symbols of the British monarchy: the English lion and the Scottish unicorn.

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    • Architecture

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    Bedford Square

    by TexasDave Updated Jun 30, 2009

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    Described as the best preserved of London's 18th century squares, Bedford Square deserves a little investigation on your way to or from the British Museum. Most of the town houses are now offices but all are original construction. The door arches are made of Coade Stone, an artificial stone made in Lambeth, South London, from a formula that stayed a secret for generations.

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    Cartoon Museum

    by christine.j Updated Mar 11, 2009

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    I had first read about this museum on Colin's - VTname Britannia2 - page about London and decided to go there. It's hidden in a small street , quite close to the British Museum. Even though there were not too many visitors, it was not the quiet atmosphere that is usually associated with a museum.Giggling, chuckling, even loud laughing could be heard all over and I soon joined in. This is a wonderful,small museum!
    I liked the fact that explanations are given next to the cartoons. Especially with political cartoons it's hard to remember after some time which person or event the cartoon refers to.
    Because of the copyright picture taking is not allowed, understandable, but still a pity. I had wanted to describe some of the cartoons to my husband, but it's hard to remember just that very stroke of the pen which makes the whole thing so funny.
    Entrance fee is £ 4.

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    Foundling Museum

    by davido7236 Updated Jun 3, 2008

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    Entrance to the Foundling Museum
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    Philanthropist Captain Thomas Coram founded the Foundling Hospital in 1739, to care for some of the abandoned London street children - it is estimated that perhaps 1,000 babies a year were left to die in alleys and rubbish tips at that time. The hospital cared for about 27,000 children during its life until the 1950's, and even had a special anthem written for it by Handel.
    It is a small museum but very moving, especially the display cases of tokens left by mothers which allowed them to identify their children if they were subsequently claimed, and the handwritten petitions of mothers pleading that the hospital accept their offspring.
    In the early days only a proportion of those seeking entrance were accepted, which could mean the difference between life and death. Groups of mothers would select coloured balls to determine which of their (about one-in-three) babies would be accepted into the hospital.
    We enjoyed the photographs, uniforms, cutlery and the recordings of former inmates describing thier lives.
    The museum has exhibits relating to the cartoonist and satirist Hogarth, as well as the composer Handel, including scores of his music, wills and other items connected with the composer and with the hospital.
    It is quite different to many other London museums and there are activities for children, audio-visual displays and a good website.

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    Whoose afraid of Virginia Woolf ?

    by sourbugger Updated May 4, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Careful ! I bite.

    Not me for a start, get 'yer coat girl, you've pulled.

    The 'Bloomsbury set' or the 'Bloomsberries' were very much a intellectual clique that existed from roughly the start of the 20th century until the second world war. They lived, partied and worked (occasionaly) in the area of London known as Bloomsbury. This area comprised the area roughly between Tottenham Court Road, Euston Road, Southampton Row and New Oxford Street. It was owned by the Bedford Estates, and thus by the Duke of Bedford. There is therefore something of a coherence about the architecture in this area.

    With the poximity of both the British Museum and Imperial University, the various writers artists, economists of the social network have spawned a forest of Blue Plaques in the area. The group itself were somewhat distrusted in their time. This was partly because most took an anti-war stance and partly because their sexual morals were somwhat different to the norm. The bohemian lifestle means thet can perhaps been seen as 'proto-hippies' where homosexuality, open marriages, bi-sexuality and other sexual liasons were common.

    It's an area to gently stroll around and discover, especially after a visit to the British Museum.

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    Tavistock Square - more to see

    by Kap2 Updated May 19, 2006

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    Dame Louisa Aldrich-Blake

    Dame Louisa Aldrich-Blake (1865-1925) is two ways unless she had a twin! She gained distinction in surgery. In 1893 she was the only woman taking the Bachelorship of Surgery, gained first class honours and qualifed for the Gold Medal, and later was the first woman to gain the Master of Surgery degree.

    The statue tells more of her institutional success.....

    the scuplture is a study in stern resolve a contrast to Gandhi's serene humility.... which is nearby

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    • Women's Travel

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  • The Foundling Museum

    by Mariajoy Updated Jan 29, 2006

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    Foundling Museum
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    Bloomsbury is a wonderful part of London to explore on foot, and as I was in the area I decided to check out The Foundling Museum.

    In the 1700's the wealthy sea captain Thomas Coram, was appalled by the number of abandoned babies he saw in London so he set about founding an orphanage for illegitimate babies under 1 year old and in good health. He was supported in his endeavours by the composer Handel and the painter of social history Hogarth and so as well as the the orphanage, this site was also London's first ever public art gallery - the funds gained from the patronage of London's elite maintained the foundling hospital.

    The orphanage changed location in the 20th century but the original Foundling Hospital still stands and is home to the largest display of Handel's musical scores anywhere in the world and a collection of Hogarths and Gainsborough paintings which hang in the original Court Room where destitute mothers would have to stand before well to do and well meaning Christian *Ladies* who, keen to support the arts and show how charitable they were, would decide if the baby would be taken in, be put on the reserve list, or be rejected.

    You won't see dormitories full of ancient lead-painted cots, or row upon row of inky desks (they weren't taught to write - it wasn't considered necessary for the jobs they would be doing) but you will see a small cabinet displaying tiny little love tokens, left on their babies by desperate mothers - little beaded bracelets, brooches, notelets, and all kinds of mementos - Mothers who gave up their babies hoping that one day they may have a better life. The children were just educated enough to work as maid servants and apprentices, but they were fed and well taken care of and at least had a chance of a better future. It's heartbreaking... take tissues!!

    The Coram Family still works today to help the socially deprived and vulnerable children of London.

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    Gower Street

    by grandmaR Updated Sep 3, 2005

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    Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts

    We often "navigated by scaffolding" (there was a lot of it around including some at Gatwick). We walked down Gower Street to this scaffolding most mornings. The bus stop was next to it, and I think it conceals the Slade College of Art or some other building of UCL. Due to my former job, I often take pictures of scaffolding by reflex.

    Next door is the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art which was established in 1904 by Sir Herbert Beerbohm Tree, the leading actor manager of the day. In 1905 the Academy moved to this building at 62 Gower Street.

    Their history says: "Fees of six guineas a term are doubled the following year, except for the children of actors, who only pay half. A managing Council is established on which Tree is joined, among others, by Sir Johnston Forbes Robertson, Sir Arthur Wing Pinero and Sir James Barrie. Within a few years they are augmented by other major figures, including W.S. Gilbert, Irene Vanbrugh and, perhaps most significantly, George Bernard Shaw. "

    Queen Elizabeth II made a speech here in 2000.

    Ordinarily this would be an off-the-beaten-path tip, but since the Bloomsbury section of the London tips doesn't have many things in it (because the British Museum is about IT for things to see), I thought I'd include it here in a relatively harmless place.

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    Roman Britain in the British Museum

    by grandmaR Updated Aug 4, 2005

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    Venus rising from the sea mosaic
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    I wanted to see the Rosetta Stone, the Elgin Marbles, and in addition I wanted to pick one section to look at in depth. I didn't think that I needed to look at stuff like Egyptian Mummies that I could see at the Smithsonian at home without flying across an ocean, so it should be something unique to the British Museum. What I picked was Roman Britian.

    I looked up on the website and found that there were free Eyeopener Tours, and there was going to be one on Roman Britain while we were there, so we visited the museum when we could take that tour.

    This mosaic is on the south wall, and is called Mosaic from a villa (Roman Britain, 4th century AD From Hemsworth, Dorset)

    "This panel is the flooring of an apse at one end of a large and imposing reception room. The scene is of Venus, the Roman goddess of love and beauty, rising from the sea, standing on a shell. She is surrounded in the outer border by fanciful dolphins and other marine creatures."

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    • Archeology
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    Universities, Hotels and the British Museum

    by grandmaR Updated Apr 24, 2005

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    Street in Bloomsbury
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    Bloomsbury is a well defined area south of the Euston Road, east of the Tottenham Court Road, north of High Holborn and west of Judd Street and Hunter Street. It has a large number of Universities and institutions of higher learning, and it also has the British Museum and good public transportation, with both buses and tube stops nearby. The London Eye is NOT in Bloomsbury and neither is the BT tower, although tips for those things have been grouped here.

    We stayed in an inexpensive hotel near the British Museum on Gower Street. We got breakfast as part of the price. It was a nice area but there weren't many really close by restaurants.

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    St Pancras Church

    by Kap2 Updated Apr 10, 2005

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    Greek Revival

    Greek Revival style built in 1820s the most expensive church of its time, this area was the development frontier of Georgian London....

    and the frontier of Europe was changing with the collaspe of the Ottoman Empire and re-emergence of Greece....

    Remember Lord Byron died two years after the construction of this church fighting for Greek independence...

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    The London Eye.

    by DUNK67 Updated Nov 26, 2004

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    London Eye
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    Take a half hour long "flight" rising to 450 foot in the air in one of 32 capsules in this oversized ferris wheel with views all over historic London.

    Admission Prices

    Price
    Adult £11.50, Child (5-15) £5.75, Under 5 FREE, *Senior (60+) £9.00, *Students £9.00. Groups of 15 or more fare paying guests receive a ten per cent discount.

    *Except weekends and the months of July and August.

    Guide Books £3.00

    Availability
    31 January to 30 April 2004:
    9.30am - 8.00pm

    May/September 2004:
    Monday - Thursday: 9.30am - 8.00pm
    Friday - Sunday: 9.30am - 9.00pm

    June 2004:
    Monday - Thursday: 9.30am - 9.00pm
    Friday - Sunday: 9.30am - 10.00pm

    July/August 2004:
    9.30am - 10.00pm daily

    Exceptions:

    5 January – 30 January 2004: closed for annual maintenance

    Bank holidays: 09.30am - 9.00pm

    22 May - 3 June 2004: open until 10.00pm

    1 - 5 September 2004: open until 10.00pm.

    Every Tuesday the first flight will be at 10.30am, except during school holidays and the months of June, July and August.

    Well we experienced our first flight at the hands of British Airways on Sunday 21st November 2004, the security was just like flying with a thorough searching of bags and questioning about sharp objects, even after departure from the capsule two people searched it with mirrors for hidden objects.

    We bought the tickets from the ticket office in the adjacent County Hall although you can buy them in advance over the phone or on the net.

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    Telecom Tower

    by benidormone Written Nov 3, 2004

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    BT Tower

    The BT Tower opened in 1964, and has a height of 191 meters and was until 1990 when the Canada Tower was finished London's tallest structure. The building was the first ever purpose built telecommunications tower built of its type. The 34th floor used to be a revolving restaurant which completed its turn every 22 minutes. The restaurant was bombed by the IRA in 1971 but stayed open until 1980 when the lease expired. Now its not possible anymore to visit the tower.

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