Buckingham Palace., London

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  • Buckingham Palace, London
    Buckingham Palace, London
    by antistar
  • Buckingham Palace, London
    Buckingham Palace, London
    by antistar
  • Buckingham Palace, London
    Buckingham Palace, London
    by antistar
  • breughel's Profile Photo

    On guard in April 2014.

    by breughel Updated Apr 2, 2014

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    Irish Guards.

    On guard in April 2014.
    With the Easter vacation there will be many tourists going to see the change of the Queen's Guard at Buckingham Palace.
    Most spectacular and colorful are the five Guards regiments of foot with their scarlet tunics and bearskin caps (now made of synthetic fiber).

    I would therefore recommend visiting on a day that Grenadier Guards, Coldstream Guards, Scots Guards, Irish Guards or Welsh Guards are on duty because it happens that other regiments - less colorful although elite soldiers - alternate with the Guards.
    For the month of April 2014 the various Guards regiments are on duty except on 3, 6, 9 & 12 April where they are replaced by the Queens Colour Squadron RAF.

    The easiest way to recognize the various Guard regiments is by their plume on the bearskin cap: white for the Grenadiers, red for the Coldstream, blue for the Irish (Prince William is colonel of the Irish Guards since 10 Feb. 2011), white and green for the Welsh and no plume for the Scots.

    Buckingham Palace guard change timing is the following:
    11:15 Guards, with bands, start arriving
    11:30 Official start time
    12:00 Guard change ceremony ends
    Please note that there is no Guard Mounting Ceremony in the forecourt of Buckingham Palace in very wet weather.

    For details see my reviews "Change of Guards at Wellington Barracks." and "Who is on guard?" or "Thorough inspection of the New Guard."

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  • cleocat's Profile Photo

    The iconic home of the queen

    by cleocat Written Jan 28, 2014

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    Buckingham Palace

    Even my mother who is not very interested in the Royal Family, first request was to see Buckingham Palace. We arrived in time for the change of guards and it is just such an awesome scene. A quick visit to the palace is a must when visiting London.

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    Changing of the guards

    by solopes Updated Dec 12, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    London - UK
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    It is a "must see" in London the changing of the guards, in the royal palace. Many hundred people compress against the grids, to see a show that, in the palace's yard, has not much to see.

    Part of the changing, daily at 11.00, the other each two days, at 11.30, the show is mainly in the surrounding avenues, with the parade of troops and bands to and from the ceremony.

    Let me tell you a story that defines English (and shames me):

    I was in Whitehall and saw a band, with the big black hat, coming down the avenue. I stepped forward into the avenue and inclined myself framing the scene, waiting for the band to approach enough to fill the picture. When I finished I looked back, and shame on me: three lines of cars were stopped behind me, the crazy guy who forgot that in England traffic is by the left hand. All London waiting for my picture, without honking or any other sign of impatience.

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  • xoxoxenophile's Profile Photo

    Famous palace & iconic royal guards

    by xoxoxenophile Written Sep 27, 2013

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    Royal Horse Guardsmen at Buckingham Palace
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    We went to Buckingham Palace to watch the Changing of the Guard. You usually can't go in the palace unless the queen isn't there, which I don't think happens very often. We could see the outside of it of course, and some of the royal guards--both the mounted ones and the regular ones with the furry hats--some of them were even part of a sort of royal marching band, though we couldn't hear them play. It's very crowded around Buckingham Palace during this time, and the Changing of the Guard takes a very long time and is a bit boring. We left after 45 minutes and it still wasn't done! Unless you are really close it's difficult to get a good picture. I think it may be a better idea to visit the Palace on an excursion to the Wellington Arch and Green Park nearby as well, and not during the Changing of the Guard. It's probably way less crowded and you can get closer to it and get better pictures.

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  • antistar's Profile Photo

    Buckingham Palace

    by antistar Updated Jul 1, 2013

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    Buckingham Palace, London
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    Drowning in flowers after Diana's death, decorated by a gaggle of awkward royals decked out in formal dress to welcome newlyweds from the balcony, the changing of the guard, the dull pomposity of Trooping the Colour clogging the airways every year... this is what I've come to know of Buckingham Palace. But to many it's a place of wonder - one of the most famous buildings in the world. Its principle facade, that fronts onto the Mall and Admiralty Arch, is instantly recognisable as the home of the British Monarch.

    Well it's actually only the official London residence of the Queen. The Royal Family have many homes, and many more throughout history. There's Sandringham, Windsor Castle, and Balmoral to name a few. There's nothing really special about Buckingham Palace, and yet at the same time there really is. Probably because it's the most imperious of their homes - it oozes somber stateliness making it perfect for the big occasions, both of celebration and sadness. And that's probably why people remember it the most.

    It's also the most accessible of the Royal residences. Part of that is because it's so central - easily reached from anywhere in London. It attracts the tourists in their droves, and the British public can throng here at a moment's notice. It's also now possible to visit the palace. After the fire at Windsor Castle caused millions of pounds of damage, to be paid for out of the public purse, Buckingham Palace opened up a few of its rooms to tourists in an effort to pay some of that cost.

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    Queen Victoria Memorial

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Jun 25, 2013

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    Queen Victoria Memorial

    The Victoria Memorial is a sculpture placed at the centre of Queen's Gardens in front of Buckingham Palace and dedicated to Queen Victoria.
    The Memorial was dedicated in 1911 by George V and his first cousin, Wilhelm II of Germany, the two senior grandsons of Victoria. The sculptor was Sir Thomas Brock. It was completed with the installation of the final bronze statues in 1924.
    The surround was constructed by the architect Sir Aston Webb, from 2,300 tons of white marble.

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    Passing The Palace

    by Balam Written Mar 12, 2013

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    From Admiralty Arch we walked down the Mall passed Clarence House and over towards Buckingham Palace, It was packed with people when we visited because the Queen was at home and everybody was hoping she would take the dogs out for a walk or something, it was far to crowded to see or even get near the changing of the Guard but we did see the Life Guard regiment of the Household Cavalry ride up to the Palace, shortly after the Scots Guards marched back from The palace.
    It was really crowded with people and it took us a long time to walk past the palace and get out of the crowds, If you are going to visit at this time it will be crowded so you need to add extra time on for this and please be careful of pick pockets, make sure all your stuff is safe!

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  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Victoria Monument

    by mikey_e Written Dec 11, 2012

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    The Victoria Monument from below
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    The Victoria Memorial stands prominently outside of Buckingham Palace, at the West end of the Mall. It is dedicated to Queen Victoria, the prolific Monarch who first made the Palace the seat of the Royal Family. Although the statue was dedicated in 1911, the most notable part – the bronze memorial – was not installed until 1924. Designed by Sir Aston Webb, the memorial is said to have a nautical theme, as a memento of the naval power that is said to have provided the British Empire its dominance amongst its European neighbours. The memorial is topped with a bronze statue of Victoria herself, but also contains smaller, darker statues (also of bronze) that depict the Angels of Justice, Truth and Charity. The monumental scale of the Memorial lends itself well not only to official functions, but also to the various tourist groups seeking to get snapshots of Buckingham Palace and the Mall.

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  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Royal Residence

    by mikey_e Written Dec 11, 2012

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    Buckingham Palace
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    Buckingham Palace is one of those places where the hordes of tourists are as much part of the attraction as the attraction itself. For those of us who are used to the seats of power and the homes of world leaders being bunkers, it can sometimes seem like Buckingham Palace is wide-open and vulnerable, although expenditures on security apparatus and personnel would prove otherwise. Perhaps it is just the fact that gates – and there are some splendid gates at the front of the Palace – are insufficient for the task of keeping out those who would seek régime change through violence. Buckingham Palace’s site passed back and forth between royals, the aristocracy and others until, finally, in the 1760s, the house on it was renovated in order to provide a living space for Queen Charlotte. These renovations continued for some seventy years, adding massive amounts of space and a neo-Classical façade. It wasn’t until Queen Victoria’s ascent to the throne, however, that it became the residence of the monarch, which it has remained to this day. Although Queen Victoria preferred to live outside of London during the latter part of her reign, the Palace was not sold and King Edward VII, upon his ascension, put it once again in the centre of Royal life and hospitality. The Palace is today open to the public only in August and September, although MPs have recently requested that the public be allowed to view the premises over greater periods each year.

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  • davidjo's Profile Photo

    JOIN THE CROWDS AT THE QUEEN'S PAD

    by davidjo Written Nov 27, 2012

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    Buckingham palace
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    Buckingham Palace--what can we say, probably the most well known house in the world!!! but did you know that on the site when the Duke of Buckingham purchased the land in 1702 stood a notorious brothel!!! Of Course everybody knows it is the official home of the Queen or ruling monarch. but in1761 George III purchased it for his wife, Queen Charlotte and not until 1837 in Queen Victoria's era did it become the recognised official residence of the Monarch. John Nash, the famous architect enlarged it with the three wings which formed the courtyard in the middle. In August and September the State Rooms are open to the public (£18), who will enjoy seeing wonderful paintings by Rembrandt and Rubins and some of the other treasures in the 19 rooms.
    Great crowds gather there to celebrate Royal Weddings and other events. The palace has 775 rooms including 188 for the staff and 72 bathrooms, 40,000 light bulbs, 1514 doors, 760 windows that are cleaned every 6 weeks(although you are unlikely to see Her Majesty up on a ladder cleaning them herself!!! And believe it or not the kitchen is able to cook for as many as 600 people having a sit down meal!!! The forecourt and railings were not completed until 1911 where the Changing of the Guards takes place every second day at 11.30 in autumn and Winter.
    The Garden has many different species of birds, 350 flowers and is used for garden parties, children's parties, classical concerts and even a charity tennis match.
    The queen has visited many countries even though she does not own a passport and although her birthday is April 21 another day is officially chosen for public celebrations.

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    The Changing Of The Guard

    by Evenith666 Written Nov 22, 2012

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    The LifeGuard Regiment
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    The best must-see event in London, and it happens every other day!

    The Changing Of The Guard ceremony is just that, the changing of the guards at Buckingham Palace. Being on a tight schedule, we hadn’t specifically planned on seeing the ceremony, but happened to be in the right place at the right time, stood on the Mall as we watched the guards ride and march past.

    We saw The Life Guard regiment of the Household Cavalry ride down The Mall towards the Palace, and shortly after the Scots Guards marched back up after being relieved by the cavalry regiment.

    The ceremony occurs every other day (see website below) and starts at Horse Guards Arch at 11am. This part of the ceremony last about half an hour and the guard can be seen on The Mall at around 11:40.

    The website below gives information on times and how to spot the different regiments of foot guards. The red-coated cavalry are The Life Guard regiment, and the blue-coated ones are the Blues and Royals.

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  • Evenith666's Profile Photo

    The Mall

    by Evenith666 Updated Nov 22, 2012

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    The Mall is the ceremonial road leading from Buckingham Palace to Admiralty Arch and Trafalgar Square. We walked down The Mall on our way to Buckingham Palace.

    Created in the early 20th Century, The Mall is similar to other ceremonial routes in Berlin Mexico City Oslo, Paris and many other capital cities of the world. As part of the development, a new façade was constructed for Buckingham Palace as well as the large Victoria Memorial. At just over half a mile The Mall is the most famous road in London, and used for either the first leg or final leg of Royal processions such as those for Weddings and Coronations. Its tarmac is coloured red to give the illusion of a giant red carpet leading to Buckingham Palace.

    It I closed to traffic on Sundays, public holidays and royal processional days, when crowds gather all the way along to watch the Royal Family appear on the Balcony, such as VE Day in 1945, and the wedding of Prince William and Catherine Middleton in 2011.

    The annual London Marathon finishes on The Mall, and it was also the start and finish line for the marathon course, road race and the race walks of the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic games.

    The Mall also sees The Changing Of The Guard at Buckingham Palace every day, with the guards marching up or down The Mall on their way between the Palace and their Barracks. We were lucky enough to see the Long Guard, featuring a standard bearer and trumpeter. The Long Guard is used whenever The Queen is in residence at Buckingham Palace.

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  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    THE HORSE GUARDS

    by balhannah Updated Sep 7, 2012

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    Still at Buckingham Palace, and the Foot Guards have marched into the Palace grounds. The crowd around mostly rush over to the Palace gates to see the changing of the guard, so I moved to the front of the roped off area. Lucky I did, as it wasn't long before the Horse guards came along, and I had a front view!
    We just watched them go past as many of the people did, then the crowd started to disperse and move away.

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    CHANGING OF THE GUARD @ BUCKINGHAM PALACE

    by balhannah Written Sep 7, 2012

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    Here they come!
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    Changing of the Guard or Guard Mounting is the process involving a new guard exchanging duty with the old guard.
    First of all, you need to know what day and what time, so click onto the listed website.

    Next, What time to get there for a good position?
    We were there half hour before, and already the crowd was thick. I asked a Bobby for a good position, and he told me roadside of the Palace gates, this is where we went. I was lucky, as there were short people in the front, so I could see over the top of them.
    If you are standing there, then the guards will come to your right, and march around to the left and into the Palace Gates.

    The handover is accompanied by a Guards band which plays all styles of music. I was rather surprised! You may hear traditional military marches to songs from films and musicals and familiar pop songs.

    When The Queen is in residence, there are four sentries at the front of the building. When she is away there are two.

    The Queen's Guard usually consists of Foot Guards in their full-dress uniform of red tunics and bearskins. If they have operational commitments, other infantry units take part instead.

    At Buckingham Palace, Guard Mounting takes place at 11.30 am.
    It is held daily from May to July, and on alternate dates throughout the rest of the year.

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  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    BUCKINGHAM PALACE

    by balhannah Written Sep 7, 2012

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    Buckingham Palace
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    Does anybody come to London and not come and see Buckingham Palace? I wonder!

    As it happened we came here twice, and walked past several times. I should have timed my visit a week later, as the Palace was open for Public Tours then.

    How much do you know about Buckingham Palace?
    I guess that it's the official London residence and principal workplace of the British monarch, and also where state occasions are held.
    It hasn't always been known as Buckingham Palace, it was originally known as Buckingham House, a large Townhouse built for the Duke of Buckingham in 1705. George III in 1761, used it as a private residence for Queen Charlotte, then it was known as "The Queen's House".
    During the 19th century it was enlarged, finally becoming the official royal Palace of the British monarch on the accession of Queen Victoria in 1837.
    I didn't know the palace Chapel was destroyed by a German bomb in World War II, and this is where the Queen's Gallery was built and is now open to the public displaying works of art from the Royal Collection.
    The East front is where the Royal family traditionally congregates to greet crowds outside.......
    The Buckingham Palace Garden is the largest private garden in London.

    The state rooms, used for official and state entertaining, are open to the public each year for most of August and September, as part of the Palace's Summer Opening.
    Please check the website for opening times.

    This year [2012], there is a special exhibition Diamonds: A Jubilee Celebration

    ADMISSION IN 2012....[INCLUDING AUDIO TOUR]
    Adult £18.00
    Over 60/ Student (with valid ID) £16.50
    Under 17 £10.25
    Under 5 Free
    Family £47.00 (2 adults and 3 under 17s)

    NO PHOTO'S ALLOWED IN THE PALACE

    Photo's allowed in the garden

    Allow 2-2.5hours to see everything

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