Buckingham Palace., London

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  • Buckingham Palace, London
    Buckingham Palace, London
    by antistar
  • Buckingham Palace, London
    Buckingham Palace, London
    by antistar
  • Buckingham Palace, London
    Buckingham Palace, London
    by antistar
  • breughel's Profile Photo

    Who is on guard?

    by breughel Updated Jun 16, 2012

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    Irish Guards at Wellington Barracks.
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    The guard duties are normally provided by a battalion of the Household Division and occasionally by other infantry battalions or other units.
    As you might know the Household Division is made up of seven Regiments:
    The Household Cavalry Regiment.
    The Life Guards and The Blues and Royals; they wear a metal helmet.
    The five regiments of foot: Grenadier Guards, Coldstream Guards, Scots Guards, Irish Guards and Welsh Guards. They wear the bearskin cap (is now made of synthetic fiber).

    To know who is on guard on the day of your visit, look at the following website www.changing-the-guard.com , at "Guard Mount Schedule" where you will find what battalion is on guard on a specific day.
    If you want to see the scarlet tunics and bearskin caps choice a foot guard regiment. During my last visit there was an alternation between the Irish Guards and the Blues and Royals. I choose the day with the Irish Guards with the band of the Grenadier Guards.
    The Irish Guards wear a bleu plume on their bearskin cap.

    June 2012 second half, every day: Coldstream Guards and Scots Guards alternate.

    There is no Guard Mounting in very wet weather.

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  • smschley's Profile Photo

    Buckingham Palace

    by smschley Updated Feb 2, 2008

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    Buckingham Palace, is one of several estates used by the British Royal family (, is one of the major tourist attractions in London. It originally was a country house built for the Duke of Buckingham. The royal family uses, but does not own, Buckingham Palace, Kensington Palace, St James's Palace, Hampton Court, Windsor Castle and other residences. They are owned by the state and cared for by the National Trust. Balmoral and Sandringham are the queen's personal property.

    In 1825 George IV commissioned John Nash to remodel the existing house into a palace where he could then hold Court and conduct official business. Due to a lack of sufficient funding, the existing house was incorporated in the new palace. Interesting George IV never lived in the palace. In 1850 the large east wing was added, including a large 40 meter long ballroom. In 1913 the East Facade was remodeled to what you see today. In 1837 only three weeks after her Accession Queen Victoria took up residence, and Buckingham Palace has served as the official London residence of Britain's sovereigns since 1837. Since her time a flag is hoisted each time the monarch is in the castle. Today the Palace contains 600 rooms and resides on a 40-acre garden.
    .
    Buckingham Palace is open to the public for two months each summer, August and September, with 18 rooms to view, including the Throne Room and State Room. There is always high demand for tickets. You can avoid the long lines for Palace tours by purchasing tickets before you go through Global Tickets, 234 W. 44th St., Suite 1000, New York, NY 10034 (tel. 800/223-6108). You'll have to pick the exact date on which you'd like to go. Visitors with disabilities can reserve tickets directly through the palace by calling tel. 020/7930-5526.

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  • easyoar's Profile Photo

    The Duke of York's Column

    by easyoar Written Feb 15, 2005

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    The Duke of York's Column

    Most British people know the nursery rhyme about the Grand Old Duke of York, who had 10,000 men (soldiers that is, it's not trying to suggest anything about his sexual orientation!). He was apparently a great leader in the army.

    Well to commemorate him, a large column was built inbetween the Carlton House Terrace on the Mall. It is led up to by a flight of steps which are not unsurprisingly called the Duke of Yorks Steps. On top of this column is a statue of the Duke of York (its a similar type of thing to Nelson's Column, but not as good and not as well known).

    Anyhow, to pay for this column, some bright spark had the idea of docking a days pay off every soldier in the British Army. You can easily imagine, that if he was popular before the column, he almst certainly wasn't afterwards!

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  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    Royal Mews

    by kris-t Written Feb 27, 2006

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    Royal Mews
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    The Royal Mews is the mews (stables and in recent times also the garage) of the British Royal Family in London. They have occupied two main sites, firstly at Charing Cross, and since the 1820s at Buckingham Palace.

    The present Royal Mews is in the grounds of Buckingham Palace, to the south of Buckingham Palace Gardens, near Grosvenor Place.

    The Royal Mews is open to the public on certain days. The Gold State Coach and other carriages are kept there, along with about 30 horses.

    There is also a Royal Mews overlooking Hampton Court Green near Hampton Court, but it is not open to the public. The old stables of St James's Palace, which stood where Lancaster House is now, where also sometime referred to as the Royal Mews.

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  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    BUCKINGHAM PALACE - CHANGING OF THE GUARD

    by LoriPori Updated Mar 10, 2006

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    Changing of the Guard
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    The five regiments of Foot Guards --- Coldstream, Grenadier, Irish, Scots and Welsh --- wear red ceremonial tunics and for the "Guard" at Buckingham Palace. The CHANGING OF THE GUARD ceremony takes place daily at 11:30 a.m. and lasts for about 45 minutes.
    Another wonderful sight to see is the Ceremonial Parade.

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  • smschley's Profile Photo

    The Changing of the guard

    by smschley Updated Dec 24, 2006

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    It’s tough to think of London and not have the “Changing the Guard” come to mind. For us it would have been inconceivable to travel to London and not catch it. The Changing of the guard is held at Buckingham Palace daily for nearly the whole summer. This ceremony consists of around 40 'new' guards replacing the 'old' ones that have been on duty. The uniformed guards march with their band across Birdcage Walk around the Victoria Memorial into the grounds of the Palace where they change places with the on-duty guards, who then march away from the Palace.

    These guards belong to the “Household Division”, and are not just ceremonial guards but are also serving Soldiers and some of the most elite and skilled soldiers in the British Army. While upholding the traditions of the past, they also perform duties throughout the world as professional soldiers and have fought in virtually every major area of conflict with great distinction since the 17th Century. This explains why changes may occur in the guard change as the soldiers are required for operational duties.

    The Household Division is made up of seven Regiments comprising: two Household Cavalry Regiment (The Life Guards and The Blues and Royals); and five Regiments of Foot Guards. The responsibility of guarding the Sovereign by the Household Troops dates back to the time of Henry VII. They also take an active role in protecting their Sovereign, and

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  • 807Wheaton's Profile Photo

    Buckingham Palace inside and outside

    by 807Wheaton Updated Oct 28, 2005

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    Buckingham Palace beautifully landscaped in the su
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    The second time we visited London we were able to go inside Buckingham Palace. We were absolutely floored by the amount of fine pictures and works of art assembled over four centuries by successive sovereigns. The State Rooms are in regular use and the style and manner in which the works of art are shown reflect their original purpose. The Royal Collection is owned by the Queen. When Windsor Castle was damaged by fire Buckingham Palace was opened as a way of collecting funds to help pay for the restoration of Windsor. You can pay for your admission with a credit card.

    Two other parts of Buckingham Palace, the Queens Gallery and the Royal Mews are open to the public also.
    Changing the Guard at Buckingham Palace is held daily in the spring and summer but during the autumn and winter guard mounting takes place on alternate dates, so be sure to check and see what day this event will occur. It never happens on very wet days.
    The guard will not come down the street if there is an unoccupied car sitting on the street.
    Sometimes a car will be removed, and towed away so that the Changing of the Guard can procede.

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  • irisbe's Profile Photo

    Don't ever "change"!

    by irisbe Updated Jul 2, 2004

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    Guard at Buckinham Palace

    I think I missed the changing of the guards at Buckingham Palace. Oh what a pity!
    I think that is a good excuse to visit again `-)

    This poor guy just started his turn and he doesn’t look very happy!

    No wonder… all those silly tourists making it a sport to make him force a grimace or wink; or those fighting to be the closest near him to get on that obligatory picture together.
    (Long live Photo Shop! I scratched them all out!)
    He must hate all those arms around him and all those breasts over his shoulders! Oh poor kid what he has to endure!



    It reminds me of a Dutch song of Boudewijn De Groot :

    “Ja tante Julia,
    ik lijk alweer veel ouder.
    Ik speel piano als u wilt,
    maar haal uw borsten van mijn schouder.”

    Translated it sounds like:

    “Yes aunt Julia, I seem again more mature. I play piano if you want, but take those breasts of my shoulder”

    Hilarious it becomes however when translated using Babel Fish of AltaVista:

    “Yes aunt Julia, I seem again much parent. I play piano if you want, but obtain your udders of my shoulder.”

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  • irisbe's Profile Photo

    Royal Coat of Arms and The Shield

    by irisbe Written Jul 10, 2004

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    Royal coat of arms and The Shield

    The picture that goes with this tip is taken from the entrance gate of Buckingham Palace.
    The Royal Coat of Arms and the Shield I will notice at other locations as well, although on this one I am missing the English motto ” Dieu et mon Droit " (God and my right) and the additional text Honi soit qui mal y pense”(Shamed be he who thinks ill of it).

    Let’s analyse it a little so you understand what every symbol represents:
    At the left you see the English Lion. At the right site you see the chained Unicorn of Scotland. This medieval creature was told to be dangerous and only could be tamed by a virgin, hence the chains.

    The shield shows several royal emblems that represent the various parts of the United Kingdom.
    You can notice the three lions in the first and fourth part. Those are the English lions.
    The first design however had only one Lion (at Henry II’s).
    In 1198 (Richard I, or Richard Lionheart), the single lion was replaced by three lions, representing England, Normandy and Aquitaine.

    In the second part you see the Lion of Scotland.
    In the 3rd part you see the harp of Northern Ireland (used to represent the whole of Ireland).

    The Shield changed a bit over the years. The last change was at Queen Victoria’s reign (1837): the Hanoverian escutcheon and the crown were removed.
    Why this happened was because there was this Hanoverian law that predicted that a woman was unable to succeed to the throne of Hanover.

    Since this change, the shield has remained identical up to today.

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  • Marpessa's Profile Photo

    awesome

    by Marpessa Updated Aug 15, 2006

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    Buckingham Palace
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    I visited Buckingham Palace on the same day as the London marathon, this meant that a lot of the main roads were closed off to cars, letting pedestrians wander around freely. I got my picture taken with a policeman and guard in one of the gates at the Palace. The architecture of the building is stunning, unfortunately I missed the changing of the guards - another thing to add to my 'next time' list.

    The second photo with this tip is a photo of the roundabout right in front of Buckingham Palace, and it is of Queen Victoria. It is very beautful, and would also be a good place to watch the changing of the guards if you didn't want to be squashed up against the fence with the crowds (in summer at least).

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  • riorich55's Profile Photo

    Palace Summer Opening and Visit

    by riorich55 Written May 14, 2009

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    State Banquet
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    Since the Queen found out that Sue and I were going to spend our first day in London on my birthday she decided to throw a little party for us. I couldn't believe it when we walked into her quaint little house and as we walked up the grand staircase the music started to play and we were escorted to the head of the table for a real live State Banquet. Oh wait a minute, I guess I was relating the dream I had, it's probably the same dream I had about the financial markets taking a plunge the next day. Oops, unfortunately that second one wasn't a dream.

    Anyway, yes we did get to visit Buckingham Palace on our first day in London. And yes, they did have the room set up for a State Banquet which was the attraction in 2008 for the annual Summer Opening. In 2009 the attraction is the Queen's Wardrobe. I'm glad we went last year. The State Banquet setting was just a wee bit over the top. I would hate to be one of the kitchen staff on the day of a State Banquet as I'm sure it's just about as hectic as one of Gordon Ramsey's Kitchens.

    The Summer Openings of Buckingham Palace usually occur in the months of August and September. The closing date when we were there was actually on the last Sunday of September as it is this year. Admission cost (we bought tickets on line ahead of time and then picked them up the day of our visit) is 16.50 pounds for adults and 9.50 pounds for children. No photography or videoing is allowed inside the palace (I borrowed the first picture from a website - all other pictures are mine). After you go through the inside you are allowed to walk through part of the Queen's Garden and Park area behind the Palace.

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  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    Buckingham Palace details

    by kris-t Updated Feb 27, 2006

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    Buckingham Palace details
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    The palace, originally known as Buckingham House, was a large townhouse built for the Duke of Buckingham in 1703 and acquired by King George III in 1762 as a private residence. It was enlarged over the next 75 years, principally by architects John Nash and Edward Blore, forming three wings around a central courtyard. Buckingham Palace finally became the official royal palace of the British monarch on the accession of Queen Victoria in 1837.

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  • doug48's Profile Photo

    buckingham palace

    by doug48 Written Jul 23, 2006

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    buckingham palace

    buckingham palace is the home to the queen of england. each day the impressive ceremony of the changing of the guard takes place in the mall in front of the palace. the palace is only open to the public in august and september.

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  • thecatsmeow's Profile Photo

    Royal Residence

    by thecatsmeow Written Sep 30, 2005

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    Buckingham Palace
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    Buckingham Palace is only open to the public in the summer monthes. We visited the day after it was closed to the public.This is one very breathtaking place from the outside. The Palace has been the home of the British Monarchy since Quenn Victoria decided to reside here in 1837. If you see a raised flag it means the Queen is in residence. The palace was rebuilt in 1825 and redone in 1913. The gates outside are something to see and all the ornamental statues.

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  • sue_stone's Profile Photo

    A Right Royal House

    by sue_stone Updated Feb 26, 2004

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    outside Buckingham Palace
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    Buckingham Palace has been the royal family's London house since 1837.

    A few of the state rooms are open to visitors for a couple of months each year.

    Hundreds of tourist stand outside the front gates to see the changing of the guards, which takes place at 11.30am most days

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