Chelsea, London

3.5 out of 5 stars 27 Reviews

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    Chelsea Old Church.

    by Regina1965 Updated Jan 24, 2013

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    I had seen a photo of this church and the statue of Sir Thomas More in a travel book and went to Chelsea to look for it. It is the church of Sir Thomas More (1478-1535). He lived in Chelsea from ca 1520 and attended the Chelsea Old Church. He rebuilt one of the chapels in the Chelsea Old Church, which is called the More Chapel and was More´s private Chapel. There is a statue of More (1969) south of the church.

    Sir Thomas More was a councellor to King Henry VIII, who ordered for him to be beheaded as More didn´t approve of King Henry´s VIII separation from the Catholic church. After his execution he was brought into the All Hallows by the Tower Church. Sir Thomas More was later canonized in 1935.

    The Chelsea Old Church dates back to the 13th century. The church was hit by a bomb in 1941 during WW2, which almost completely destroyed the church, apart from the More Chapel and some of the Monuments. The church was rebuilt in 1950. There is a reproduction of a Medieval Arch in the church.

    The church is filled with beautiful Monuments, many of which commemorate the "great" families living in Chelsea. It is said to have the finest collection of Monuments outside of Westminster Abbey. Many of them were damaged during WW2, but were saved and restored.

    When I visited there was a concert rehearsal, and the sacristan or the vicar, I don´t know, whispered and asked me where I was from and gave me a leaflet on the history of the church. So I tiptoed in there, looking at all the Monuments and reading up on the church. The church is filled with Monuments, one of which is More´s Monument and Tomb, even though it is not believed that he is not buried here, due to the nature of his death.

    The Chelsea Old Church is a Grade I listed building.

    There is a book on the history of the church "Chelsea Old Church, The Church that would not die".

    When I left the church I stood by the entrance and was taking a photo with flash and at the exact same moment a lightning struck, scaring the living daylights out of me.

    Sir Thomas More. Chelsea Old Church - the Medieval Arch. Chelsea Old Church. Chelsea Old Church. The More Chapel.

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  • London Pubs 1

    by Mariajoy Updated Dec 31, 2005

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    In Central London - don't expect to find many friendly locals in the pubs - 'cos there aren't any. They are all run by Australians and Kiwis, and frequented by tourists. The drinks are expensive and if you ask for chips they will be covered in cheese sauce even if you asked for chips without cheese sauce - Chips with cheese sauce is NOT normal. No Londoner eats this ...... I don't know who does :))

    There is a particularly nice pub just along The Strand, The Coal Hole where you can get great pub grub like jacket potatoes and cheese and mushroom melts, soup, big fat burgers, and various sandwiches, for just under £6. There's a huge variety of other meals available and they also have "Edmunds Wine Bar" downstair too - but I haven't been there for a long time!

    Hogs Head The Cole Hole interior
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  • The Saatchi Gallery

    by Mariajoy Written Nov 1, 2008

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    The new Saatchi Gallery is now open in Duke of York Square - and this magnificent building is home to exhibitions of contemporary art from around the world. Currently the work on display is by Chinese artists but I shall be back soon to see the "Germania" exhibition too!

    More information about this "free to enter" (isn't London fab??) gallery can be found on their website.

    (The "old" Saatchi gallery was previously located in the former GLA building on the South Bank).

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    Sloan Square

    by Sharon Updated Jul 21, 2003

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    This area is another area which isnt known to the tourists in London. but its a nice are to explore. beautiful streets and houses. nice pubs and cafes.
    If you have the time or if its not your first trip to London and you want to see more of the city take a walk in this are and explore it for half a day.

    During Christmas

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    Visit the famous flower show

    by Tracyden Written Feb 19, 2011

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    Well worth a trip - we had a ticket for one day of the show and one days is enough time to see all the display gardens and tour the grand pavillion.

    There's the chance to get tips and have a chat with the garden designers and to but some unusual seeds and garden ornaments.

    Also - don't miss the Pims stalls.

    See my travelogue on my London page for more

    show garden
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    Nude in the Gardens!

    by HackneyBird Written Mar 19, 2015

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    This full-sized bronze nude entitled 'Awakening' is by Gilbert Ledward (1888-1960). It is situated in Roper's Gardens, opposite Chelsea Old Church on the Chelsea Embankment. The statue was created in 1913 and captures the moment when one wakes from a deep sleep. It was installed in the gardens in 1965.

    Ledward, born in Chelsea to an artistic family, won the British Prix de Rome scholarship for sculpture and the Royal Academy's travelling award in 1913 and during 1914 travelled around Italy producing sketches.

    At the start of the First World War he was commissioned into the Royal Garrison Artillery and later went on to be a war artist for the Ministry of Information.

    After the war, he was much in demand as a sculptor of war memorials and from 1927 to 1929 he was a Professor of Sculpture at the Royal College of Art. He went on to become president of the Royal Society of British Sculptors and was awarded an O.B.E. in 1956, just four years before his death.

    Ledwards other works in London include the fountain in Sloane Square and the bronze figures of St Nicholas and St Christopher at the Hospital for Sick Children in Great Ormond Street.

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    Kensington & Chelsea

    by Oana_bic Updated Aug 13, 2006

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    From the ever-hip King's Road in Chelsea to the more recently popular Notting Hill; the shopping heaven that is Kensington High Street; the fantastic greenery and scenery of Kensington Gardens; or some of London's top museums, located in South Kensington - Natural History Museum, Victoria & Albert, Science Museum.
    For those into markets, Portobello Road is highly recommended, situated just behind Notting Hill Gate. The area around Portobello Road also has many trendy and unique boutiques, perfect for fashonistas.
    For big department stores, there is none better than the world famous Harrods in Knightsbridge. Close behind is John Lewis in Sloane Square, which underwent a recent refit, whilst Barkers in Kensington is smaller and not as well stocked, but still worth checking out if in the area. My favorite though is Harvey Nics - just next to Harrods.
    Harrods IS pricey, but it is well worth visiting even if you do not attend to buy anything because of the beautiful decor and the amazing selection. Visiting the enormous food hall, on the ground floor, is an absolute must. You might also enjoy having a cappuccino and a snack in one of the numerous cafes, or treat yourself to afternoon tea.
    Nowadays, amongst other things, Kensington and Chelsea is the most affluent borough (local authority area) in Britain.
    Perhaps surprisingly then, it is very popular with younger visitors because there are still much reasonably-priced accommodation available.

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    The Chelsea Cruise

    by Elodie_Caroline Written Apr 19, 2007

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    The Chelsea Cruise is in and around the Chelsea and Battersea regions of London on the last Saturday of every month, mostly during the summertime. It's a great evening out, seeing all of the old classic cars. There are American Cars like Cadillacs and Chevy 57s here, plus there are other weird and wonderful modes of transport that actually turn up at these events. We once saw a cut down red Bus, and what can only be described as a white box on wheels with Christmas lights all around it!
    When we had our old Ford Cortina mk4, we had that painted an Ice cream pink with Pink Panther on the bonnet back in the early 190s; we drove proudly along the Cruise with the rest of them and wasn't out of place at all.

    Chelsea cruise - Vauxall Cresta Me & our Pink Ford Cortina
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    Chelsea Flower Show

    by kzngirl Updated Apr 12, 2006

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    My mum-in-law loves flowers. She really enjoys working in her garden back in South Africa, and whenever she visits us, she always likes to make sure she squeezes in a visit to Kew Botanical Gardens, and the annual flower shows: Chelsea Flower Show and Hampton Court Flower Show.

    Last year (2005), she invited me to go with her to check out the Chelsea Flower Show.

    The Chelsea Flower Show is an annual event, taking place over a period of five days, every May. The gardens and foreground of the Royal Hospital in Chelsea are totally transformed by the most exquisite show gardens, flowers, vegetables and assorted garden paraphernalia.

    This spectacular event really is a sight to be seen. The wonderful displays and exhibits will provide you with inspiration for whatever size garden you have at home - even I was inspired to tend the earth, and I was living in a flat!

    The tickets sell out incredibly fast, so if you are keen to visit the gardens, you should definitely consider buying them online from the official website.

    The show was packed the afternoon we visited - the sun beat down (even though it was May) and we lay on the grass sipping a sweaty glass of Pimms as we paused before taking in the rest of the show. The flowers are fantastic, and the colours amazing...It was a great opportunity to see what London gets so excited about every year. I had a lovely time. It would have been nicer to have gone for the whole day, however, as we only bought afternoon tickets, so had only a few hours to enjoy the experience.

    A great annual highlight...

    Tickets range from GBP42 - GBP12 depending on the day and time you go. Check out their website for details on how to get there and to buy the tickets online.

    A futuristic display So many people! Just some of the wonderful sights This was one of my favorite displays The weird and wonderful veg!
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  • Chelsea Physic Hospital

    by Mariajoy Written Sep 27, 2008

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    An ancient walled garden where from the 17th century apothocaries have researched and studied the medicinal purposes of flowers shrubs and herbs. Nowadays the plants are grown for conservation purposes and visitors can wander round admire the flora and fauna - visit the cafe and shop or just relax with a book in the sunshine.

    The garden is near Chelsea embankment a short walk from Sloane Square tube station or the 170 bus from Victoria. You could also visit the National Army Museum and the National Trust property Carlyle's House on Cheyne Walk.

    Adult tickets are £7 - check the website for opening times and other ticket concessions.

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    Chelsea Bridge

    by Airpunk Written May 25, 2006

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    We all know Tower Bridge, London Bridge, Westminster Bridge and a couple of other London bridges a tourist won't miss. But Chelsea Bridge is a little away from the famous tourist attractions. The suspension bridge was opened in 1937, but there had been a bridge on this place in 1858 already. A recommendation I do on every bridge in London: See it at night when it is illuminated.

    Chelsea Bridge at Night (seen from north bank)
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    You're Not There Any More, Mr Moore!

    by HackneyBird Written Mar 15, 2015

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    This sculpture by Andrew Sabin stands outside Henry Moore Court on the former site of the Chelsea School of Art. It was commissioned by the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in 2011 to replace Henry Moore's sculpture 'Two Piece Reclining Figure no 1'.

    Andrew Sabin was born in London in 1958 and studied at the Chelsea School of Art from 1979 - 1983. He worked in the field of experimental object making until 1989 when he held his debut exhibition in a shop in Islington. The exhibition was later shown at the Whitechapel Gallery in East London.

    He went on to create art instillations,his first major work being produced for the Chisenhale Gallery in East London.

    His later works include the 'Round Bridge' and the 'Square Bridge' at Ravensbury Park, 'The Calibrated Ramp' for Bracknell Forest Council in 2003, and 'The Coldstones Cut' in 2010, which is located at Pateley Bridge in the Yorkshire Dales and won the Marsh Award for Public Sculpture in 2011.

    Sculpture, Manresa Road, Chelsea.
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    Chelsea Flower Show

    by annase Updated Aug 3, 2007

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    Every year in May, there is a huge garden exhibition in the grounds of the Royal Hospital in London called Chelsea Flower Show. It is spectacular. I went there a few years ago, but it is just fab. You can pick up loads of great gardening tips, if you are into that sort of stuff, obviously. At the end of the show, they also sell plants with hefty discounts.

    The exhibition lasts only 5 days, but the exhibitors prepare months and months in advance for the show. The show features some of the finest examples of horticultural excellence and the best displays and gardens get awarded with gold, silver and bronze awards. The show also sets the latest gardening trends and functions as a platform to launch new plants.

    Designers have to apply to create show gardens. Since there is only 20 spaces, only the extraordinary garden designs make it to the show. There are also more than 100 floral displays as well a number of smaller gardens, falling into categories 'the stylish and bold chic gardens', 'courtyard gardens', 'roof gardens' and 'city gardens'.

    Make sure you buy your tickets early (months and months before) as it sells out fast.

    Buddha statue in previous years' show
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    Gone But Not Forgotten.

    by HackneyBird Updated Mar 15, 2015

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    The old Chelsea Public Library stands in Manresa Road, just off the King's Road in Chelsea. Built in 1890, and designed by the architect J M Brydon. It was awarded a Grade II listing in 1969. The building is no longer used as a public library but is part of the Chelsea College of Science and Technology.

    Despite my best efforts I cannot find out any more information about this lovely old building. If anyone has any additional information I would be very grateful for your help.

    The old Chelsea Public Library, Manresa Road, SW3 Plaque, the old Chelsea Public Library
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    Sloane Square and surrounding area

    by Sophie1980 Written Aug 31, 2004

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    This really is a gorgeous part of London. Get off at Sloane Sq. tube station and either wander down the King's Road, or head towards the river (take the number 11 bus - it'll only take 5 minutes). Lots of gorgeous red brick houses and appartments. Very green and even if it does get crowded, it's not ghastly like other parts of London. The King's Road was in my 'tourist trap' section, but this was 2 years ago and after my visit today (31/08/04) it's now one of my must sees. Good shopping, pretty views and lots of lovely pastel houses to drool over, plus a short walk to the river.

    Bloomfield Terrace, Chelsea

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