City of London (the Square Mile), London

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  • Temple Bar - Detail
    Temple Bar - Detail
    by wabat
  • Temple Church - Round and Effigies
    Temple Church - Round and Effigies
    by wabat
  • Temple Bar
    Temple Bar
    by wabat
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    ST MARY ALDERMANBURY CHURCH and SHAKESPEARE

    by davidjo Written Dec 17, 2012

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    peace in the garden

    The connection is that the bust of William Shakespeare stands on the site of where the church used to be in Aldermanbury Gardens. The church was destroyed during the blitz, leaving the walls standing, but the stones from the walls were transported to Missouri in 1966 and built a memorial to Winston Churchill. It is a small garden with the bushes and the bust of Shakespeare in the centre.

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    CLOCKMAKER'S MUSEUM

    by davidjo Written Dec 17, 2012

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    wonderful old clock but can't remember the name
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    The Museum can be found on the west side of the Guildhall, and is free to enter. All the clocks, watches, horological items belong to the Worshipful Company of Clockmakers and is the oldest collection in the world and have been collected since 1814 but the public have only had access to them since 1874. Most of the exhibits are from 1600-1850 including marine timekeepers and it is interesting to see the history of the clocks. In the same building is the Library of the Worshipful Company of Clockmakers.

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    A BEAUTIFUL COMPLEX

    by davidjo Written Dec 17, 2012

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    GUILDHALL
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    The Guildhall is probably the third building on the site and it was built in 1411 and one of the few buildings that survived the Great Fire of London. It derives its name form the Anglo-Saxon word "gilt" meaning payment, thus payment hall. Today many of the original rooms survive including the print room, the library and the crypt and are still used. The Guildhall Art Gallery has been added to the complex on one side of the square.

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    ST.MARY WOOLNOTH

    by davidjo Written Dec 17, 2012
    strange name

    This church at the intersection of King William St and Lombard St stands on ground that has been used for worship for over 2,000 years as traces of Roman and Pagan religious buildings have been found underneath the church as well as a Anglo-Saxon wooden structure. This is the third church on the site and was built in 1716

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    MANSION HOUSE, the mayor's place

    by davidjo Updated Dec 17, 2012

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    LORD MAYOR'S DIGS
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    Mansion House,originally housed the stock market was built in the mid 17th century is the official residency of the Lord Mayor of London, Six columns support the sculpture which has a symbolic figure representing the city of London who is tramping on her enemies.The main entrance is called the Egyptian Hall and has many columns and sculptures. As the Lord Mayor is the chief magistrate Mansion House has its own court of law with 11 cells, one of which held Emmeline Parkhurst, the women's suffragette.
    The stock market stood on the site for nearly 500 years

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    HENRY GREATHEAD

    by davidjo Written Dec 17, 2012
    railway engineer

    James Henry Greathead (1844-1896) worked as an engineer on the London Underground and in particular was responsible for the Tower Subway. He also had many patents to improve the work such as hydraulic jack propulsion and the use of compressed air. He became engineer for many railways including the first electric one in 1890 which is part of the Northern Line now. His statue was erected in 1994 outside the Royal Exchange and rather cleverly hides a ventilation shaft from the underground.

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    DUKE OF WELLINGTON RIDES AGAIN

    by davidjo Written Dec 17, 2012

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    bootless and saddleless

    This bronze statue of Wellington is cast from the guns he captured from the French and sits on a granite pedestal near the Royal Exchange. The statue does not honour Wellington's war efforts but was placed there in recognition by the city in his efforts in allowing the rebuilding of London Bridge and King William Street. You will notice that there is no saddle, stirrups or boots as this is the way that victorious Roman Generals rode their horses centuries ago.

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    THREADNEEDLE STREET'S OLD LADY

    by davidjo Written Dec 17, 2012
    BANK OF ENGLAND
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    The Bank of England was established in 1694 and is the world's second oldest bank, and has had the headquarters in Threadneedle street since 1734. The bank is sometimes known as "the old lady of Threadneedle Street" as the ghost of Sarah Whitehead (the black nun) used to haunt the bank's garden. The main reason to visit the building would be to visit the museum which is free (10 am -5 pm Monday-Friday). In the museum you have the opportunity of lifting a 13 kg bar of gold, but you won't be able to run off with it as you have to put your hand through a hole to lift it, and the gold bar cannot pass through the hole. Your only chance to have £330,000 in your hand!!! As well as the history of the bank you will be able to see old notes, coins and even weapons that were used to defend the bank.

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    ROYAL EXCHANGE-now shops for the rich

    by davidjo Written Dec 16, 2012
    sir Richard Grisham keeps a lookout
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    Sir Thomas Gresham, the person who built the original Royal Exchange in 1565 stands upon the top looking towards his Bishopsgate. The present building was opened in 1844 by Queen Victoria but trading did not begin until the 1st day of the next year. Sir William Tate designed the four sided building with a central courtyard where merchants conducted their affairs. In 1939 the Exchange was closed and now it is a luxury shopping centre with a wine bar in the courtyard.

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    THE INSIDE OUT BUILDING

    by davidjo Written Dec 16, 2012
    i hope it's insured
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    Richard Rogers designed the Lloyd's Building which opened in 1986, and became a London landmark as the elevators, staircases electrical and water conduits were on the outside of the building. The 12 elevators were the first of their kind in England and the building was similar in design to the Pompidou Centre in Paris. When i walked past it the other day i realised it is past its prime and looked rather odd compared to when it was opened thirty years ago. Several rooms were transferred piece by piece from the 1958 Lloyd's building across the street.
    12,000 sq.m. of glass, 30,000 sq.m. of stainless steel cladding and 33,500 cubic metres of concrete were used in the construction.

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    THE MARKET IN CITY OF LONDON

    by davidjo Written Dec 16, 2012

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    cobble stones and restaurants
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    Leadenhall Market dates back from the 14th century and was one of the oldest markets in the City of London. The market is open daily from 7am selling fresh food produce but there are quite a few upmarket shops selling clothes and ornaments. It is quite a tourist attraction now with many cafes/restaurants by one of the the entrances. The roof structure is painted green, maroon and cream, and the floors cobble stones,

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    ALL HALLOWS STAINING

    by davidjo Written Dec 16, 2012
    the tower
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    The tower of All Hallows Staining is all that remains of a church that was on this site since 1321, and was originally called Staining Church (stone church). The St. Olave's Church and All Hallows Staining were at one time combined, but in 1870 the All Hallows was demolished, only leaving the tower. The Worshipful of Clothworkers maintain the tower, but Princess Elizabeth, later queen Elizabeth I donated the bell ropes as she said it was music to her ears when she was imprisoned in the Tower of London.

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    SAMUEL PEPYS BURIED AT ST.OLAVE'S

    by davidjo Written Dec 16, 2012
    St Olave's Church
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    St. Olave's Church dates back from 1056 but in 1666 the flames from the Great Fire of London came very near the church but it was saved due to the wind changing direction. However it was slightly damaged during WWII but was renovated in the 1950's. The church is dedicated to the Patron Saint of Norway, King Olav II who helped who helped King Ethelred the Unready against the Danes in 1014 at the Battle of London Bridge, and King Haakon 7th of Norway attended the church while in exile during WWII. Samuel Pepys who worked at the Naval office was buried in the church with his wife. Mary Ramsey who is reputedly responsible for bringing the Black Death to London is supposed to be buried in the church yard.

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    THE GENERAL LIGHTHOUSE AUTHORITY

    by davidjo Written Dec 16, 2012
    Trinity House

    This has its headquarters at Trinity House on the north side of trinity Square overlooking the Tower of London. The organisation is responsible for the lighthouses, light vessels, buoys and communication equipment. throughout the territorial waters of Britain except for Scotland, Isle of Man and Northern Ireland. Trinity house maintains 69 lighthouses, 3 ships and some smaller boats too, operating along the coast of England and Wales. I did not enter the house but through the window i noticed some wonderful models of ships, lighthouses on display.

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    THE GREAT SIEGE OF MALTA 1940-43

    by davidjo Written Dec 16, 2012
    History
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    The memorial to the siege of Malta stands by the front of All Hallows-by-the-Tower Church and honours the brave allied servicemen and women who lost their lives at sea, on land and in the air as well as the survivors who stoutly defended the island. The island of Malta in the Mediterranian was of strategic importance during WWII as whoever controlled had access to Africa. The Royal Air Force and the Royal Navy prevented the island from falling into German hands despite over 3,000 bombing raids from the German Luftwaffe and the Italian Air Force and Navy . British ships attacked the German ships who were trying to resupply their troops in North Africa. After the Battle of El Alamein in 1942 the British went on the offensive and sank 230 enemy ships in five months.

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