Greenwich, London

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Greenwich, SE10

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  • Greenwich Market
    Greenwich Market
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  • climb the o2 for the view.
    climb the o2 for the view.
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  • Greenwich Market
    Greenwich Market
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  • Natalya2006's Profile Photo

    Greenwich

    by Natalya2006 Updated Jan 29, 2010

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    Night view from Cutty Sark Gardens to London
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    The London Borough of Greenwich stretches along the River Thames for eight miles. At its edge is the town center - Maritime Greenwich, the World Heritage Site.
    Pick up a map from the tourist office in Cutty Sark Gardens and then walk up Greenwich Church Street and go trough the market, turn right and enter Greenwich Park. You can see in Greenwich: Cutty Sark ( replica of tea clipper, it was the fastest sailing ship in 19th century), Greenwich Market, St. Alfrege Church, Old Royal Observatory, National Maritime Museum, Chapel, Painted Hall (University of Greenwich).
    From the Observatory Hill you can enjoy one of the London's finest views.

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    Prime meredian at Greenwich

    by bag-bug Written Jan 14, 2010

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    Greenwich at 12.00 noon

    Get down at cutty sark DLR station (zone 2), nice walk for about 15-20 miniute uphill, and you reach at Prime meridiam Greenwich. just next to the main gate, there is a line on ground you can have our snap (as I had) with letting prime meridium through your legs. you may visit the old observatory (free) and have your snaps there.............great place for science lovers

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    National Maritime Museum

    by Durfun Updated Jan 7, 2010

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    Greenwich Complex, from River Thames
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    Greenwich Palace, which is now the Old Royal Naval College, is where Henry VIII was born. He went on two marry two of his six wives there. His daughters Mary and Elizabeth, who would later become monarchs themselves, were also born at the palace.

    Henry VIII was very fond of ships, and Greenwich was well sited for visiting the new shipyards at nearby Deptford and Woolwich.

    Although the palace Henry would have known is no longer standing, the land on which Greenwich Palace once stood has since become a world heritage site and the home of the Old Royal Naval College.

    To the east of the Naval College is the Trinity Hospital almshouse, founded in 1613, the oldest surviving building in the town centre.

    Behind the former Naval College is the National Maritime Museum housed in buildings forming another symmetrical group and grand arcade around the Queen's House, designed by Inigo Jones. Continuing to the south, Greenwich Park is a Royal Park of 183 acres, laid out in the 17th century and formed from the hunting grounds of the Royal Palace of Placentia.

    Explore Britain's encounter with the world at sea from the 16th to the early 20th centuries. Steer a ship into port, learn about waves and tides, see how our lives depend on the ocean and hear the story of human exploration.

    National Maritime Museum* Mon–Sun 10.00–17.00 (Nelson's coat with fatal bullethole!)
    Queen's House* Mon–Sun 10.00–17.00 (cool geometrical floor design, nice hall)
    Royal Observatory* Mon–Sun 10.00–17.00 (where Western/Eastern hemispheres meet!)

    Whilst here, why not visit the Royal Observatory & the Prime Meridian? See the next tip!

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    Stand in both Eastern and Western Hemispheres!

    by henry14 Written Oct 12, 2009

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    A good day out can be had by taking a boat trip (or Docklands Light Railway - DLR) to Greenwich to visit the Royal Observatory which is home to the Prime Meridian Line. No visitor -young or not so young!- can resist standing across the meridian line with one foot in both eastern and western hemispheres at the same time! Lots of other things there as well to easily fill an afternoon. Greenwich Park (where the Observatory is situated) is lovely as well, a great location for a picnic on a nice day.

    http://www.nmm.ac.uk/places/royal-observatory/

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    Cutty Sark

    by jusdenise93 Updated Jul 20, 2009
    In front of the ship
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    See the ship docked at sea!

    The Cutty Sark is the last surviving tall ship left in the world. It was designed by Hercules Linton and during her time at the sea, the Cutty Sark became one of the fastest ships of ther time

    In December of 1954, the Cutty Sark was moved to Greenwich and officially she was opened in 1957.

    The Cutty Sark isn't a destination for most tourists but if you're already in the area ( visiting the Royal Observatory), the Cutty Sark is just a short walk from there. Plus see another part of the River Thames, worth the trip!

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    The Royal Obesrvatory

    by jusdenise93 Updated Jul 20, 2009

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    The Royal Observatory is the king of time, this is where the time system of the world are based on, the Greenwich Mean Time (GMT).

    It is also home of the Prime Meridian of the World (Longitude 0 degrees 0' 0" ), where the eastern hemisphere meets the western hemisphere. You can be in two places at once. :)

    Because navigation was poor, and shops were constantly getting lost at sea, King Charles II founded the Royal Observatory which was designed by no other that Sir Christopher Wren. The Observatory's purpose was to provide accurate charts of the stars

    There is also a museum located on the site, here you can marvel at the history of space and time. You can also see the 28-inch refractor of 1893, the largest telescope of its kind in Britain.

    Enjoy the panoramic views of Greenwich when you get up there, truly astonishing! And don't forget to get your Meridian certificate souvenir which prints the exact time and date when you stood on the Prime Meridian of the world mine say, 12:18:1753 on 20 October 2006 ( On top of the museum, you'll see the Time Ball, at exactly 1pm local time, the ball drops.)

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    Stand On The Prime Meridian

    by csordila Updated May 4, 2009

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    The Royal Observatory
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    On top of the hill in the middle of Greenwich Park sits the Royal Observatory; in the courtyard is a metal strip, the Greenwich Meridian Line, where standing on the line you are in the East and West at the same time.

    Fixing the Meridian at Greenwich took shape on the International Meridian Conference. in Washington, DC, in 1884. After this Conference every place on Earth is measured in terms of its angle East or West from this line, just as the Equator divides the North and the South.
    The only exception was France abstained from the vote and they continued to use the Paris Meridian for several decades.
    By the way, in Hungary the meridian pass through Nagyvárad (today Oradea in Romania) was used as Zero Longitude.

    The high point of the visit for many tourist is to take a photo standing one foot on eastern hemisphere, the other on the western hemisphere.
    At dusk prime meridian line is lit by laser.
    Plan your visit on a weekday, weekends get crowded.

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  • Something for everyone

    by greymoment Written Jan 19, 2009

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    Re London attractions... I love visiting Greenwich. It's a World Heritige Site with more than enough to entertain for a whole day (with or without kids). Royal Observatory, Planetarium, Maritime Museum, Greenwich Park, The Market, etc. (all free entry) and it's great to travel to/from by river boat. Info and more links at: www.greenwichwhs.org.uk

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    THE MILLENNIUM DOME LONDON

    by alyf1961 Written Nov 25, 2008

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    MILLENNIUM DOME
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    The London dome was built during 1999 to house the millennium experience and mark the new millennium and was named the millennium dome.
    It was built on the Greenwich peninsular in southeast London.
    It was opened to the public on 1st January 2000 for one year after staging a starstudded millennium eve party.
    The exhibition was the subject of considerable political controversy as it failed to attract the number of visitors anticipated, leading to recurring financial problems.
    I visited the millennium exhibition twice during 2000, and I loved it. It was a hands on exhibition covering areas such as environmental issues, changes in employment roles, the human body and how we interact with each other in the world today.
    The dome closed in 2001. It reopened in 2003 during December for a winter wonderland experience. It was used by the lord mayor of London for a few free music festivals and during Christmas 2004 it was used as a shelter for the homeless.
    In 2005 the interior of the dome was demolished and the shell sold to O2 [a mobile phone network] who opened it as a sports and entertainment centre. It opened to the public on 24th June 2007 complete with shops, restaurants and arenas.

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    THE TUTANKHAMEN EXHIBITION

    by alyf1961 Written Nov 25, 2008

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    THE DOME

    The Tutankhamen exhibition at the Dome, London was good. We Brits have always had a love of all things associated with Tutankhamen, as it was Howard Carter, the English archaeologist, who discovered his tomb in Egypt in 1922. The exhibition as well as artefacts from King Tut's tomb also included objects from other royal tombs dating back to 1555 BC - 1305 BC.
    I was a bit disappointed with the exhibition as I had expected to see his death mask or a sarcophagus of his but there was only one of his wife, Ankhsenamun.

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    Peter Harrison Planetarium

    by cheezecake_deli Written Aug 31, 2008

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    The Bronze Cone @ Peter Harrison Planetarium

    On top of the hill in Greenwich Park behind the Royal Observatory is the Peter Harrison Planetarium. Housed in the South Building of the Royal Observatory, it is home to the Bronze Cone, one of the largest single uses of bronze in the world. The Planetarium has exhibits on astronomy and is generally geared toward school-age children.

    Admission is free. Open daily from 1000 to 1700.

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    Queen's House

    by cheezecake_deli Updated Aug 30, 2008

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    Queen's House

    The Queen's House in Greenwich was commissioned by Anne of Denmark, wife of James I, in the early 17th century. Designed by Inigo Jones in Palladian style, it was the first fully Classical building in England. At the centre of the building is the Great Hall, a 40 foot by 40 foot cuboid space over two floors. Also of note is the Tulip Staircase, the first spiral self-supporting staircase in England. Today, the Queen's House holds the National Maritime Museum's fine art collection.

    Admisison is free. Open daily from 1000 to 1700.

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    Old Royal Naval College

    by cheezecake_deli Written Aug 30, 2008

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    Old Royal Naval College

    Founded in 1694 by William III (for the relief and support of seamen and their dependents), the Old Royal Naval College buildings were designed by Sir Christopher Wren and constructed by the Thames on the site of the former Greenwich Palace between 1696 and 1751. Its most famous hall, the Painted Hall, was decorated by James Thornhill over 19 years, but it stood unused until 1806 when the body of Admiral Lord Nelson was brought here to lie in state.

    Admission is free. Open daily from 1000 to 1700.

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    Royal Observatory - Greenwich Meridian Line

    by cheezecake_deli Written Aug 30, 2008

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    The Prime Meridian

    Perhaps the most popular sight in Greenwich today is the Royal Observatory, home to the Prime Meridian, the reference line for Greenwich Mean Time. Located atop a small hill in Greenwich Park, the Royal Observatory was established in 1675 by Charles II to produce accurate tables of star positions for navigators. The Prime Meridian, itself an arbitrary line chosen as a reference (every point on Earth is measured in terms of its distance east or west from this line), is traced across and through the Royal Observatory - its position is defined by the eyepiece of the Transit Circle telescope, built by George Airy in 1850. Lots of tourists gather here for photos, one foot in the Eastern hemisphere and the other in the Western hemisphere!

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    The Cutty Sark

    by uglyscot Updated Jun 14, 2008

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    The Cutty Sark

    A must see visit is Greenwich where the Dateline is. The area itself is green and the Greenwich Naval College stands out as beautiful white building.
    After walking around and seeing all the maritime features, and strolling up to the Greenwich Observatory, it is then time to find the now land-locked Cutty Sark. This was one of the famous tea clippers that carried tea from the Orient to London. Races were undertaken to see which ship could cover the distance first.
    This fine ship now sits for all to see.

    Since I wrote this tip, there was a fire that caused much damage to the ship.

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