Greenwich, London

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Greenwich, SE10

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  • Greenwich Market
    Greenwich Market
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  • climb the o2 for the view.
    climb the o2 for the view.
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  • Greenwich Market
    Greenwich Market
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  • scotlandscotour's Profile Photo

    Greenwich - Cutty Sark - and Time for Tea :-)

    by scotlandscotour Updated Jun 15, 2004

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    Going round the Cutty Sark (Tea Clipper) as a child introduced me to tea, adventure and a fantasy world of pirates, exploration, ... a world now filled with Disney .

    Cutty Sark is the last remaining Tea Clipper in the world - I didn't know that! - It's fun, romantic and rich in history. A welcome change from the bussle of city life.

    Maritime Greenwich is a World Heritage Site - so how can you miss it?

    Greenwich Observatory may be stuffed by light pollution but it is still Greenwich Mean Time, and the prime meridian - and the views of the city are great!

    Great pubs and atmosphere in this town that was seperate from London before the sprawl of Greater London absorbed it. It started as the Palace for Kings, and its military and navel connections live on. It may be a bit out of the centre - so read about it now!

    As well as the above web link, try Greenwich Guide for info, pictures, etc.

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    Greenwich Foot Tunnel

    by easyoar Updated May 21, 2006

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    Greenwich Foot Tunnel - AKA The Pipe

    http://www.greenwich-guide.org.uk/tunnel.htm
    The Greenwich Foot Tunnel is locally known as "The Pipe", and it is not hard to see why as you walk through it. It's a long walk and if you are claustrophobic or nervous of being mugged it probably isn't the thing for you, even though it does have security cameras at points throughout it.

    When I went through, the lift was broken at one end, which meant a long flight of stairs. The Tunnel itself is approx 1217 feet long and takes you under the Thames near the Isle of Dogs. It was built to allow workers to cross to the Docks on the Isle of Dogs. The tunnel opened in 1902, is free to walk through and is lined with 200,000 white glazed tiles, you can probably see a fair number of them in my picture here!

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    Stand On The Prime Meridian

    by csordila Updated May 4, 2009

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    The Royal Observatory
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    On top of the hill in the middle of Greenwich Park sits the Royal Observatory; in the courtyard is a metal strip, the Greenwich Meridian Line, where standing on the line you are in the East and West at the same time.

    Fixing the Meridian at Greenwich took shape on the International Meridian Conference. in Washington, DC, in 1884. After this Conference every place on Earth is measured in terms of its angle East or West from this line, just as the Equator divides the North and the South.
    The only exception was France abstained from the vote and they continued to use the Paris Meridian for several decades.
    By the way, in Hungary the meridian pass through Nagyvárad (today Oradea in Romania) was used as Zero Longitude.

    The high point of the visit for many tourist is to take a photo standing one foot on eastern hemisphere, the other on the western hemisphere.
    At dusk prime meridian line is lit by laser.
    Plan your visit on a weekday, weekends get crowded.

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    Greenwich Park

    by sue_stone Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    overlooking Greenwich Park

    Greenwich Park is a great place to relax during a visit to Greenwich.

    It is the oldest Royal Park in London.

    There are excellent views across the Thames to the Docklands and Canary Wharf.

    If you are here in the warmer months make sure you bring your rug and soak up some London sunshine.

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    Greenwich Palace (Placentia) and the Royals

    by wabat Updated Jul 27, 2013

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    Former Site of Greenwich Palace
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    While this tip is to draw your attention to the former Greenwich Palace commemorated by a, hard to see, stone plaque I will also outline, in a very summary form, the royal connection with Greenwich.

    In 2012 and as part of the Queen’s Golden Jubilee celebrations the hitherto plain Borough of Greenwich became a member of a very exclusive club with only three other members (Kensington and Chelsea, Kingston upon Thames and Windsor and Maidenhead). Greenwich was granted Royal status and became the Royal Borough of Greenwich.

    While the word royal and words related to royal have been, and continue to be, used with gay abandon in Greenwich for hundreds of years it has been a long time since the Royal family has lived here.

    The first recorded royal link with Greenwich is that of Edward I making offerings at the chapel of the Virgin Mary in the 13th century. Edward II acquired Eltham Palace (on the outskirts) in 1305 and it became a royal residence. This remained the main focus of royal activity in the borough until the 16th century when it was eclipsed by Greenwich Palace.

    A royal manor called Bella Court belonging to Henry IV existed on this site before Duke Humphrey of Gloucester, half brother of Henry V, built Greenwich Palace here on the banks of the Thames in 1447. Subsequent occupants renamed the palace, Placentia, the pleasant place, and it became a royal favourite for the next two centuries.

    In this time Placentia was the birthplace of three of Britain’s most famous (Tudor) monarchs - Henry VIII (1491), Mary I (1516) and Elizabeth I (1533). Henry was also christened in the nearby Church of St. Alfege. The stone plaque you see today, laid on 7 September 2003 (Elizabeth I’s birthday), is directly above the foundations of Placentia.

    Elizabeth particularly liked this palace and it was here she signed the orders that dispatched her fleet against the Spanish Armada.

    Post Elizabeth I, Greenwich lost its pre-eminent position amongst London’s royal residences – by this stage they had lots of choice. Henry VIII, in addition to his collection of wives for which he is most famous, had also amassed quite a collection of palaces – some twenty-one in fact.

    After the English Civil War the royal court was swept from Greenwich and Placentia was first used as a biscuit factory and, between 1652 and 1654, for housing Dutch prisoners of war. By the 1660s it was in decay and was demolished (after an attempt to rebuild it) by Charles II.

    From the seventeenth century onwards, royal attention focused on Greenwich’s relationship with the sea and this is what you can see around you to-day. The only remaining former royal property in central Greenwich is the Queens House – also put to alternative use post the English Civil War. This is a short walk inland from the former Greenwich Palace.

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    A Visit to Greenwich

    by Donna_in_India Updated Jun 3, 2011

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    The magnetic clock outside the Royal Observatory
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    The nicest way to reach Greenwich is to take a boat from Wesminster Pier. Boats leave daily from 10:00 a.m. and the trip takes about 60 minutes.

    When you reach Greenwich, make the climb to the Royal Observatory - www.nmm.ac.uk/places/royal-observatory/. This was where Greenwich Median Time was established in 1884. It is also the location of Britain's largest refracting telescope. The Observatory itself is set in a beautiful park.

    A brass rule on the ground - the Meridian line - marks the line between the Eastern and Western hemispheres of the earth. The Meridian line represents the Prime Meridian of the World - Longitude 0 degrees. You will see everyone straddling the line for a photo opp!

    Flamstead House at the observatory contains exhibits tracing the history of astronomy, sundials, sea clocks, etc. There is also a planetarium that has ongoing shows.

    Royal Observatory is open daily from 10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Admission charge for the planetarium shows, entrance to the observatory is free.

    Other things to see while in Greenwich include the National Maritime Museum (www.nmm.ac.uk), the Cutty Sark, which is currently under restoration (www.cuttysark.org.uk/), and Greenwich Center itself. In the center are restaurant and shops. There is a market on Thursdays - Sunday that spreads out from Church Street. Crafts by local artisans, clothes, antiques, books, snacks, and produce are available at the market.

    Please note that all visitor information is correct as of this update.

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    GMT

    by fishandchips Written Feb 9, 2006

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    The GMT Clock
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    The fastest way to get to Greenwich is to take the Tube in Central London to Waterloo Station, where you can take a fast train to Greenwich Station. Alternatively, from Waterloo Tube, take the Docklands Light Rail through the various stations, past Canary Warf and off at Grenwich. Greenwich has been the zero point used in the reckoning of terrestrial longitudes since 1884. At Grenwich there is the From National Maritime Museum which has everything from the dreaded cat-o'-nine-tails used to flog sailors to Nelson's Trafalgar coat complete with bullet hole in the left shoulder clearly visible. You can stand on the zero degree line (yay) then take a walk around the free museum. The view over the docklands is really good from up on the hill (where the Museum is). While you are out this way you can also visit the Cutty Sark - it's a tea thing!!

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    The Cutty Sark

    by uglyscot Updated Jun 14, 2008

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    The Cutty Sark

    A must see visit is Greenwich where the Dateline is. The area itself is green and the Greenwich Naval College stands out as beautiful white building.
    After walking around and seeing all the maritime features, and strolling up to the Greenwich Observatory, it is then time to find the now land-locked Cutty Sark. This was one of the famous tea clippers that carried tea from the Orient to London. Races were undertaken to see which ship could cover the distance first.
    This fine ship now sits for all to see.

    Since I wrote this tip, there was a fire that caused much damage to the ship.

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    Greenwich Market

    by wabat Written Jul 27, 2013

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    Greenwich Market - Church Street Entrance
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    Greenwich Market operates from Tuesday to Sunday and has about 120 stalls selling arts & crafts, antiques & collectables, clothing, curiosities, vintage items, some fresh produce and takeaway food (with a few tables) – something to suit everyone. Don’t overlook the shops around the periphery of the market – mainly arts and crafts in nature as well.

    As markets go it’s a rather yuppie affair and incredibly busy as weekends though this adds to the atmosphere. While not a yuppie myself, I do enjoy this covered market, especially during the winter – grab yourself a glass (or two) of hot mulled wine and go for a wander and if your’re lucky you might even come across some classical music performed by students from nearby Trinity College of Music. I do hope you don’t come across the rendition of Shakespeare (and generally I like Shakespeare) that I had the misfortune of having to endure as I enjoyed the artwork in nearby Queens House on a recent visit.

    Greenwich Market is Royal Charter Market with the Charter granted to Commissioners of Greenwich Hospital on the 19th December 1700 for 1,000 years.

    The market was originally located on the site of the West Gate of the Old Royal Naval College though by the 1800s had spread into the surrounding dark alleys and streets. The whole area had become rather unsafe so as part of a general clean-up of the Thames bank area the market was moved a few blocks to the west and its current location.

    By the 1830s the new market contained traders selling live and dead meat, fish, eggs, butter, poultry, fruit and vegetables. It is this, rather than its current arts and crafts offering, that explains the biblical quotation over the College Approach arch - Proverbs Chapter 11 verse 1:

    “A false balance is an abomination to the Lord but a just weight is his delight”

    This early version of the market came replete with slaughterhouses for cattle and stables for horses. In 1905 the slaughterhouses were closed and the market bye-laws changed to enabling trading six days a week (Monday – Saturday). I am not sure when Monday was replaced by Sunday.

    Over the 1900s produce trade declined and by the mid-eighties action was required action to save the markets. In 1985 produce gave way to arts and crafts and the markets you see today began (based on – and perhaps surpassing if you prefer a smaller market - the successful model at Camden Lock). The cobbled pavement remains.

    Opening Times

    Tuesday through to Sunday 10AM-5.30PM

    Located a short walk from the DLR with entrances on all four sides from College Approach, King William Walk, Nelson Road and Greenwich Church Street

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    Greenwich

    by Natalya2006 Updated Jan 29, 2010

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    Night view from Cutty Sark Gardens to London
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    The London Borough of Greenwich stretches along the River Thames for eight miles. At its edge is the town center - Maritime Greenwich, the World Heritage Site.
    Pick up a map from the tourist office in Cutty Sark Gardens and then walk up Greenwich Church Street and go trough the market, turn right and enter Greenwich Park. You can see in Greenwich: Cutty Sark ( replica of tea clipper, it was the fastest sailing ship in 19th century), Greenwich Market, St. Alfrege Church, Old Royal Observatory, National Maritime Museum, Chapel, Painted Hall (University of Greenwich).
    From the Observatory Hill you can enjoy one of the London's finest views.

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  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    Greenwich Observatory

    by kris-t Updated Jan 29, 2011

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    Greenwich Observatory
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    The observatory is the site of 0 meridian.

    The Royal Greenwich Observatory is located in Greenwich and the Prime Meridian passes through the building. Greenwich Mean Time was at one time based on the time observations made at the Royal Greenwich Observatory, before being superseded by Coordinated Universal Time. While Greenwich no longer hosts a working astronomical observatory, a ball still drops daily to mark the exact moment of noon (UTC) 1pm (13:00)(BST), and there is a good museum of astronomical and navigational tools.

    The observatory is situated in Greenwich Park, which used to be the grounds of the Royal Palace of Placentia. At the bottom of the park is the National Maritime Museum which also includes the Queen's House, designed by Inigo Jones. It is free to visit all these buildings. Greenwich also features the world's only museum dedicated to fans, the Fan Museum, in a Georgian townhouse at 10–12 Croom's Hill (fee payable). Also on Croom's Hill, on the corner of the junction with Nevada Street is Greenwich Theatre, formerly Crowder's Music Hall.

    For more - see our Greenwich page.

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    Royal Astronomer's Digs

    by grandmaR Written Apr 22, 2005

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    Bob at the Royal Observatory Entrance
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    The Royal Observatory was founded on 22 June 1675 by King Charles II, and was built specifically to do work which would help to solve the problem of finding longitude - one's exact position east and west - while at sea and out of sight of land. The Royal Astronomer was given a stipend for his work.

    Because the observatory was accidentally built just slightly off the prime meridian, the astronomer did most of his obervations in a shed at the bottom of the garden instead of in the actual (more comfortable) observatory.

    The Prime Meridian is the line on which all time zones is based. It goes from pole to pole, on the opposite side of the earth from the International Date line.

    This is a very important location to sailors and pilots or navigators. GMT is Greenwich Mean Time - sometimes referred to as Zulu time. When you set your GPS (Global Positioning System), it will ask for the number of hours offset from GMT

    The observatory was built on the site of on the site of Greenwich Castle, which originally belonged to Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester (brother of Henry V) and was often used as a guest house and hunting lodge by Henry VIII. At that time this was the richest part of London.

    There is also a planetarium which we didn't visit. Short courses for the whole family, which take place in the Planetarium and Discovery Room (in the South Building) from 10.30 to 12.00 on Sundays. Suitable for age 8+

    Greenwich Park which includes the Royal Observatory with the meridian is open daily: 10:00 - 17:00 (10am - 5pm) NOT OPEN 24 / 25 / 26 December. Last admissions 30 minutes before closing. It's free.

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    Greenwich Hospital

    by kris-t Updated Jan 29, 2011

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    Greenwich Hospital
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    The Greenwich Hospital was founded in 1694 as the Royal Naval Hospital for Seamen.

    It is a Royal Charity for the benefit of seafarers and their dependents, with the Secretary of State for Defence acting as the Crown's sole Trustee.

    The hospital was established as a residential home for injured sailors, on the model of Les Invalides and the Chelsea Hospital. The charity now funds sheltered housing for former Royal Navy personnel and the Royal Hospital School at Holbrook in Suffolk.
    The hospital occupied its prime riverside site on the south bank of the river Thames in Greenwich, London for over 170 years, closing to pensioners in 1869.

    It was subsequently occupied by the Royal Naval College until 1998 when the site was opened to the public and the main buildings transferred to academic uses. The principal occupant is now the University of Greenwich.

    For more - see our Greenwich page.

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    THE MILLENNIUM DOME LONDON

    by alyf1961 Written Nov 25, 2008

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    MILLENNIUM DOME
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    The London dome was built during 1999 to house the millennium experience and mark the new millennium and was named the millennium dome.
    It was built on the Greenwich peninsular in southeast London.
    It was opened to the public on 1st January 2000 for one year after staging a starstudded millennium eve party.
    The exhibition was the subject of considerable political controversy as it failed to attract the number of visitors anticipated, leading to recurring financial problems.
    I visited the millennium exhibition twice during 2000, and I loved it. It was a hands on exhibition covering areas such as environmental issues, changes in employment roles, the human body and how we interact with each other in the world today.
    The dome closed in 2001. It reopened in 2003 during December for a winter wonderland experience. It was used by the lord mayor of London for a few free music festivals and during Christmas 2004 it was used as a shelter for the homeless.
    In 2005 the interior of the dome was demolished and the shell sold to O2 [a mobile phone network] who opened it as a sports and entertainment centre. It opened to the public on 24th June 2007 complete with shops, restaurants and arenas.

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    Sweeping Views and More

    by RhineRoll Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Maritime Greenwich and the Docklands Highrises
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    For a great view of the city, including the classical buildings of Maritime Greenwich and the high-rises of the Docklands area, head out for Greenwich Park. At the top of the hill is the famous Royal Observatory and a couple of other interesting places to check out. If you have problems going uphill, it is also possible to drive up there, coming from behind. If you keep to the right of the Observatory hill, there also is a street going upl with a somewhat gentler incline.

    The park is one of the oldest royal gardens in London. Together with Maritime Greenwich, it is listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. You might well spend a whole day visiting all the sights in the park and nearby Greenwich Village!

    This place is very popular both with Londoners and tourists. Expect crowds, especially when going there on a holiday and on a lovely day. The area is well served by public transportation including the DLR.

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