Hyde Park, London

4.5 out of 5 stars 187 Reviews

Park Lane, Bayswater Road, Knightsbridge +44 20 7298 2100

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  • A Cottage in Hyde Park
    A Cottage in Hyde Park
    by spidermiss
  • Swans on the Serpentine who don't like dogs!
    Swans on the Serpentine who don't like...
    by spidermiss
  • Serpentine Bridge, Hyde Park
    Serpentine Bridge, Hyde Park
    by spidermiss
  • davidjo's Profile Photo

    THE REFORMERS TREE

    by davidjo Written Nov 25, 2012

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    I followed the sign with keen interest to find this special tree in Hyde Park but i was surprised when i came across a mosaic design on the ground, which was laid in the year 2000 to commemorate a tree burnt down during the reform riots of 1866. The stump became a meeting place and notice board for the reformists, but the authorities managed to stop them which resulted in the formation of Speaker's Corner in 1872.

    pretty mosaic tree
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    Walk by the Serpentine

    by davidjo Written Nov 25, 2012

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    The Serpentine (thought to be named as it resembled a snake) was fed by the River Westbourne until it became too polluted in 1834 so water was pumped from the Thames, but now it is fed by three boreholes. Since 1930 there is a cordoned off swimming pool that is only open in the summer, and since 1864 there is a 100 yard race every xmas morning, open for members of the swimming club only. The winner is awarded the Peter Pan Cup. Rowing boats can be hired and there is the Solar Shuttle which ferries people between the north and south bank. Around the lake you will find, Princess Diana's memorial, the Holocaust Memorial, the Serpentine Gallery and the Italian Garden.

    Serpentine Bridge
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  • davidjo's Profile Photo

    EXPLORE THE PARK

    by davidjo Written Nov 25, 2012

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    The 253 hectare Hyde Park is one of the largest Royal Parks in Central London which was originally obtained by Henry VIII in 1536 when it was still a deer park. James 1 allowed access to the gentlefolk but not until 1637 when Charles 1 allowed access to the public. Throughout the next centuries the park was landscaped and the Serpentine was formed by blocking off the Westbourne river/stream. Queen Elizabeth gate was constructed by Aspley House at Hyde Park Corner in 1825. There are many places of interest within the park and all are well signposted along the various paths. Speaker's Corner, Princess Diana Memorial, Holocaust Memorial are some of the things to see, but also there is interesting botany and wildlife to see. Rock concerts are performed here throughout the recent decades as well as horse riding and various sports.

    info the park in autumn many paths Serpentine cool day
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    HYDE PARK GRAND ENTRANCE

    by balhannah Updated Sep 8, 2012

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    It sure is a "Grand Entrance" to the park!
    The Main Entrance is also known as Queen Elizabeth Gate, and its located at Hyde Park Corner next to Apsley House.

    Many grey columns, three carriage entrance archways, two foot entrances, the whole entrance stretches for 33 metres. In the centre is a beautiful frieze representing a naval and military triumphal procession. It does have ornamental gates, with the design of Greek honeysuckle.

    Hyde Park opens from 5:00 am until midnight all year round.

    Pay and Display parking is available on West Carriage Drive and in Car Parks at either end of Serpentine Bridge.

    Hyde Park entrance gates
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  • Britannia2's Profile Photo

    Hyde Park

    by Britannia2 Written Mar 26, 2012

    This is a large park close by to the shops at the Marble Arch end of Oxford Street - seperated by Park Lane from the West End.
    There are boats for hire on the Serpentine , bikes for hire, formal gardens , lots of open grass spaces for picnics and games, a number of places to eat and also a long sand track for horses to follow through the park. It is amazing that such a large park can be found in one of the worlds largest cities.

    Horses in Hyde Park Boats for hire in Hyde Park Hyde Park Daffodils in Hyde Park
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  • DennyP's Profile Photo

    VISIT THE WAR MEMORIALS AT HYDE PARK CORNER

    by DennyP Updated Dec 7, 2011

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    HYDE PARK CORNER
    I got of the tube at Hyde Park corner as there were a few things here that I wanted to see.. The first mainly was the New War Memorials . These War memorials have been placed here as to adjoin previous Memorials that are located here.. My main interest was to see the New Australian Memorial that has only recently been added along with the New Zealand Memorial. Britain has always been a fighting nation protecting its many far flung outposts in its Empire. Also the countries of the Empire have always answered the call when England was at war..Australia and New Zealand although having very small populations foolishly were first to put their hands up for duty. This folly was done at extreme expense to their populations .
    I must say I was really impressed with the new War Memorial., so well done, and so much bigger than I had expected..The memorial covers all of Australian different arms of the forces and the many different conflicts that it was involved in for the Empire. Really lovely polished marble with names imprinted or etched into the marble of so many scenes of conflict.
    The New Zealand memorial depeicts many protruding steel beams that are crosses with the names of the many different conflicts that the Kiwis were involved in also..There were many wreaths at the New Zealand memorial the day I visited.
    Also located here is a big memorial to the The Royal Regiment of Artillery and also to the the household Guards Divisions, ie:Grenadier Guards, Coldstreem Guards , Scots Guards , Irish Guards and The Welsch Guards. A really impressive memorial with wreaths to all the Divisions place at its base.

    MEMORIAL OF DIFFERENT ARMS OF THE AUSTRALIAN FORCE MAP DEPICTING PLACES OF CONFLICT OF AUST.FORCES THIS WAS OF SPECIAL INTEREST FOR ME THE NEW ZEALAND  WAR MEMORIAL BRITISH MEMORIAL TO THE ROYAL ARTILLERY REGIMENTS
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  • akikonomu's Profile Photo

    Lovely place to be

    by akikonomu Written Sep 9, 2011

    I'm really quite crazy about parks and flowers so Hyde park was my favourite spot amongst those I visited in London. Beautiful roses and gardens, peaceful joggers along the water-edge and just the place to relax

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  • christine.j's Profile Photo

    The Rose Garden in Hyde Park

    by christine.j Updated Jun 12, 2011

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    I've been to London so often, have walked in Hyde Park, but only this time in May 2011 did I see the Rose Garden. What a beautiful spot! Of course, in May the roses are in full bloom, so it was especially nice to walk there, much nicer than in late October or November.
    I'm not an expert on roses, but even I noticed the many different kinds or breeds - can one use the term "breed "for plants? .

    This garden within Hyde Park is really worth a visit. It's close to the tube station Hyde Park Corner.

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  • akosilei's Profile Photo

    The Parks

    by akosilei Updated Apr 10, 2011

    If you'll ask me why I love London -- it is because of their lovely parks!The flowers, the green grass, the lovely colors of leaves in the trees, the smell of air... it blesses my soul. I could stay there all day observing people, reading a book or sitting there simply enjoying the view.

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  • WheninRome's Profile Photo

    Hyde Park

    by WheninRome Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Hyde Park is too big to see all at once in my opinion. We took in pieces of it while strolling through the Bayswater Road Art Show. In one area a bicycle race was being conducted, while in others some playground rides and yet in others people running, relaxing and taking in some sun.

    We certainly did not get to see and do everything in Hyde Park, but some of the highlights are the Serpentine Lake, Diana Fountain, Speaker's Corner (I would have like to have seen this in action, but didn't), and the Rose Garden.

    Gate into Hyde Park Hyde Park A Fountain in Hyde Park Hyde Park Hyde Park
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  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Hyde Park & Kensington Gardens

    by MM212 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Although often thought to be one park, the enormous rectangular green space in west London is in fact two separate parks: the eastern half is Hyde Park and the western half is Kensington Gardens. Together, they are the largest green space in central London and cover an area larger than Monaco. The park was originally a manor owned by Westminster Abbey until it was purchased by Henry VIII in 1536 and turned into a private hunting ground. In the 17th century, the grounds were opened to the public eventually served as a park, which continued to be landscaped and managed until it took on the look we have today. Hyde Park is a real marvel and provides an escape from the busy streets of London to an English countryside, albeit at a much shorter distance. A relaxing stroll through the park is the perfect thing to do on a sunny day in London.

    Spring in Kensington Gardens - Apr 2010 A path in the park - Apr 2010

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  • dustmon's Profile Photo

    Peter Pan in Hyde Park

    by dustmon Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    This was a must-see for me, being a huge fan of Peter Pan (and Alice in Wonderland, too!). I had heard about the wonderful statue of Peter Pan, which sort of recently was re-invented during the movie "Hook" where Robin Williams wakes up after his journeys..... anyways it is a beautiful piece of art and a wonderful photo op for anyone "who's just gotta crow!"

    Peter in Hyde Park
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  • jorgec25's Profile Photo

    A perfect break

    by jorgec25 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Hyde Park is huge, but it's very easy to find your way around the park.

    It's a perfect place to take a break from the City, and all it's traffic, noises and people.

    You can easily find some quiet places to rest, or just walk along lake and cross the park.

    Just be aware of those comfortable looking chairs, because you have to pay to sit there (more details on my tourist traps tips).

    Hyde Park Hyde Park Hyde Park
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  • Hanau93's Profile Photo

    Hyde Park- lovely piece of green

    by Hanau93 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Again I will probably give away my nationality as this girl was so eager to see green grass and flowers and not frozen ponds and snow covered ground. We strolled through Hyde Park on a lovely Sunday afternoon after having witnessed the changing of the guards. Everyone was out there, we saw skateboarders performing, people in outdoor cafes with not even one free spot so i sat down on the green grass to watch the Canada Geese enjoy the nice temps just like me.. I also wanted to see the Princess Diana Memorial Fountain but was a bit disappointed..i think she deserved a better monument..

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  • cheezecake_deli's Profile Photo

    An historic royal park...

    by cheezecake_deli Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Originally a royal hunting ground, Hyde Park was opened to the public in 1637 by Charles I. At 350 acres in size, it is one of the larger parks in central London. It was the site of the Great Exhibition of 1851, and has been a location for many mass demonstrations. Today, it is also the site of many rock and pop concerts in the summer, though mostly it is just a pleasant green space to be in when the weather is good. Some sites of interest within Hyde Park are: Speakers' Corner (near Marble Arch), Diana Memorial Fountain (near Knightsbridge), and the Serpentine, a lake that separates Hyde Park from neighbouring Kensington Gardens. You can go boating there.

    Looking west across the Serpentine
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