Hyde Park, London

4.5 out of 5 stars 173 Reviews

Park Lane, Bayswater Road, Knightsbridge

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  • Winter Wonderland in Hyde Park
    Winter Wonderland in Hyde Park
    by cleocat
  • More Winter Wonderland
    More Winter Wonderland
    by cleocat
  • War memorial in hyde park.
    War memorial in hyde park.
    by londontraveller01
  • jo104's Profile Photo

    Take a stroll through Hyde Park

    by jo104 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Jo & Han - where did all the ducks go??
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    Hyde park is a wonderful place to walk around covering 340 acres its london's largest royal park, have a picnic or simply indulge in some sun whilst taking in the fresh air rustling through the leaves. You can walk across from Marble arch to the museum district think how much time you'll save on tube changes!

    Hyde Park is open from 5am – 12pm all year
    Enjoy a meal at the following places
    The Dell – eastern side of the Serpentine, The Honest Sausage – Speakers corner – north east side, Lido café – south side of the Serpentine
    Refreshment points – Speakers corner, the boathouse, playground, Hyde park corner & Triangle car park

    There is the Diana memorial which was designed to signify the turbulent & smooth times in her life. You can paddle in the water although watch out some parts are rather deep - Allan (TheView) offered to carry me at one point but I feared we may have both toppled over!

    Speakers corner is at the Marble Arch end of the park where speakers meet every sunday to literally get on their high horse (ok well footstool) and speak their mind be it political, religious, cultural or completey ridiculous. Since 1872 people have been allowed to speak at Speakers Corner on any subject they want.

    Enjoy yourself walking, rollerblading, rowing, swimming & bird spotting (the feathered kind)
    The Serpentine Lido & paddling pool is open to the public 7 days a week from end of June to September.

    See if you can find the following statues - Achilles who was London's first nude statue but now wears a fig leaf to save the ladies' blushes. In nearby Kensington Gardens a statue of Peter Pan which was placed during the night for children to believe in the magic of the boy who never grew up. Towards the Albert hall & the museum district is the wonderful guilded Albert memorial

    History: Henry VIII acquired the land from the monks of the Westminster Abbey & he often rode through the park hunting for deer. Charles I had the Ring created in 1637 & opened it as a park to the general public.

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  • sylvie-uk's Profile Photo

    Albert memorial

    by sylvie-uk Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Albert memorial

    Albert memorial was commissioned by queen Victoria in memory of her husband prince Albert who died in 1861. It was designed by Georges Gilbert Scott.
    It contains a statue of prince Albert and statues at the four corners which represent Europe, Asia, Africa, and America. It was restored around 1990.
    It situated just opposite the Royal Albert hall.

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    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture
    • Museum Visits

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  • Regina1965's Profile Photo

    Wonderful Hyde Park.

    by Regina1965 Updated Jan 15, 2013

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    The Upside-down tree.
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    There are so many wonderful parks in London, that is one of the good things about London with all its numerous attraction - that you can seek refuge in one of its marvellous parks.

    Hyde Park is the largest park in center London and a Royal Park. It is adjacent to Kensington park (see my next tip) it covers a very large area in center London. It has got a big artificial lake - he Serpentine, which divides the park in two - you can rent a boat and even swim in the lake on hot days. There is a good restaurant by lake Serpentine The Serpentine Bar & Kitchen where one can sit and enjoy the wonderful surroundings.

    Hyde Park used to be a deer park and a private hunting ground for the King in the olden times but was opened to the public in 1637.

    There are several entrances to the park, one of them being the Grand Entrance or Queen Elizabeth Gate (1825).

    There is one strange tree in the park, The Upside-down tree, and you can walk inside it, it feels like being in a tent. I have visited the park during all seasons, in winter time the green colour of the Upside-down tree turns into a beautiful copper colour and the leaves don´t fall off. I add photos of the copper colour tree in a travelogue.

    There is a memorial fountain in Hyde Park right next to the Serpentine. It is in memory of Princess Di, the Diana Princess of Wales Memorial fountain. It was opened by The Queen in 2004. It is beautiful and so serene. It is open from 10:00-16:00 in September-October, from 10:00 until 16:00 in November-February. In March from 10:00-18:00 and in April-August from 10:00-20:00.

    There are so many beautiful statues in the park, including one of a big horse-head.

    Don't miss Speaker's Corner on Sundays ;) it can be quite funny listening to the speakers standing on soap-boxes, sometimes entertaining, sometimes plain funny or frustrating. It is located in the North-East part of Hyde Park which is closest to Marble Arch.

    Opening hours: 05:00 until midnight, but it gets way too dark in the park to walk through it.

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  • ginte's Profile Photo

    Hyde Park

    by ginte Updated Oct 23, 2006

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    Hyde Park
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    Hyde Park is London's largest Royal Park and originally a hunting forest belonging to Henry VIII. It has lots of green grass, nice walking road, even the Love Alley and place for horse-ridding. A lovely park is always full of people and a good place for to rest from the city noise.

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  • sylvie-uk's Profile Photo

    Hyde park

    by sylvie-uk Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    hyde park

    140 hectares: the breath of fresh air in London.
    Henry 8 acquired the park from the westminster monks abbey in 1536. It was a private hunting ground until James 1 permitted access. Charles 1 created the ring and openned it to the public in 1637.
    In 1665, people went to hide from the plague and camp in the park.
    At the end of 17 century, William installed the first oil lamps. Queen caroline had extentions carried out and created the Serpentine lake(see photo).
    Nowdays , it s a venue for celebrations, for leisure activities, for sports and events.

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  • thecatsmeow's Profile Photo

    Take a walk in the park!

    by thecatsmeow Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Feeding the fowl on the Serpentine
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    One of the things I loved the most about London were the parks. Hyde park was SO HUGE! It was like another world within the city. We spent a few hours just exploring as many of the trails that we could. The park is 630 acres of some beautiful lawns,flowers trees and wildlife. Some magnificent statues can be found also. Hyde is also the home of the Serpentine which is a 41 acre lake where you can sail model boats. The famous speakers corner is also located in the northeastern tip near Marble Arch. Sad to say I have no pictures of either. Rotton Row is the parks 300 year old riding track and also I found out it is the first public road to be lit at night in the country. This was a wonderful area to just go and relax with nature all around.

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  • christine.j's Profile Photo

    The Rose Garden in Hyde Park

    by christine.j Updated Jun 12, 2011

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    I've been to London so often, have walked in Hyde Park, but only this time in May 2011 did I see the Rose Garden. What a beautiful spot! Of course, in May the roses are in full bloom, so it was especially nice to walk there, much nicer than in late October or November.
    I'm not an expert on roses, but even I noticed the many different kinds or breeds - can one use the term "breed "for plants? .

    This garden within Hyde Park is really worth a visit. It's close to the tube station Hyde Park Corner.

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  • Marpessa's Profile Photo

    Great place any time of day!

    by Marpessa Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Italian fountains, Hyde Park
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    The first time I came here in 2004 I stuck mainly to the Bayswater Rd side of Hyde Park (as this was near my accomodation), but was surprised at the huge number of people spending time and relaxing at Hyde Park - awesome. I definitely recommend a leisurely stroll or having a picnic here, especially after a long day of sight-seeing (or even a short one!). Also try to visit the Italian fountains and their surroundings - a particularly beautiful area of the park (recently seen in the movie 'Wimbledon' and 'Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason').

    Update: In 2005 I explored more of this park, it is so big it is hard to see it all. But I walked along the Serpentine River, past the statue of Peter Pan, fed some squirrels, walked around the Albert memorial (for photos of that monument see my travelogue), and saw many other monuments - one of which I was staring at for so long that when a flock of pelicans (or some large bird) went overhead, they scared me half to death! This is a great place to chill at the end of a long day, walk or jog along a track, play a game of football in a field, or just sit against a tree and read a book. I really recommend it.

    Although just a note: try to buy drinks (water) before coming to Hyde Park as the stands around the park will charge you twice the normal price!

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  • MedioLatino's Profile Photo

    Hyde park's nicest "entrance" - detail

    by MedioLatino Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Crowned lion on the top of the gate

    If something is nicer around, then the fence of the Buckingham Palace, is this gate which leads from the square in front of Buckingham to the Hyde park. Amazing details! Like this crowned lion on top.

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  • lou31's Profile Photo

    Hyde Park...explore and relax.

    by lou31 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Places like this make for a peaceful break

    One of my favourite places in London. Lots of things to see and do here and very quiet and relaxing. I loved the beautiful trees and walking around the many paths and tracks was a real pleasure.
    Of course on a sunny day you have to share it with thousands but the place is so big finding a quiet place is not that difficult.
    Plenty of signs to show the way to various places of interest and cafes here and there for a fuel stop. You'll need it if you want to walk through all of it! The park is massive.

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    • National/State Park
    • Family Travel

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  • Mairo21's Profile Photo

    Strolling through the park

    by Mairo21 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Chillin' out with the geese
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    If you are tired of sightseeing and want a place to unwind and relax, I found that Hyde Park was the place to do it. A huge park with a large pond, benches, open grass,and pathways to stroll along.
    It seems everyone took time out to come to the park at the end of a long day.
    The ducks and mute swans that inhabit the pond are quite friendly. If you are an animal lover, you will really enjoy the interaction with the swans and ducks which I assume are accustomed to being fed by people.
    Just an overall relaxing environment

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  • lou31's Profile Photo

    Hyde Park...Rotten Row

    by lou31 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Riders on Rotten Row

    Rotten Row was a special attraction for me. I had read many horsey books as a child and had really wanted to see it for my self.
    It was originally part of King William 111's carriage drive from Whitehall to Kensington Palace. It was the first lamplit road in the country and designated as a public bridleway in the 1730's.
    I especially got up early one morning hoping to catch some horses out and about. I wasn't disapointed and the horses and riders were so well turned out.

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    • National/State Park

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  • Fen's Profile Photo

    Hyde Park

    by Fen Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    One of London's finest historic landscapes covering 142 hectares (350 acres). There is something for everyone in Hyde Park. With over 4,000 trees, a lake, a meadow, horse rides and more it is easy to forget you're in the middle of London.

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  • rwlittle's Profile Photo

    Have a picnic in Hyde Park!

    by rwlittle Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Hyde Park, Serpentine

    If the weather is good, having a relaxing lunch out on the grass in Hyde Park might be the thing to do. The photograph shows one part of Hyde Park, with boaters pontooning out on the Serpentine. It's a long walk from there towards Kensignton Palace; you'll run into lounge chairs and a flock of swans as you go. In early May, the grass and the gardens were lush and green.

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    • Sailing and Boating

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  • sourbugger's Profile Photo

    Hyde park on a Sunday Morning

    by sourbugger Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Hyde park

    On a bright sunny Sunday morning a trip to Hyde park is a very enjoyable way to pass a few lazy hours.

    Hundreds of artists hang their wares on the railings on the north side of Hyde Park, and nearly all of them are original pieces. The exhibits stretch from approximately Bayswater tube station in the west to beyond Lancaster Gate tube in the east. The nearest tube stops are Bayswater and Lancaster Gate.

    Whilst some are the most awful twee pieces of rubbish, many others are well painted London Scenes. There are also painters exhibiting their latest 'cutting edge' creations.

    From there it is a short walk to Speakers corner (In NE corner of Park) where you can indulge in watching the banter between speakers who just turn up with a box and spout forth on any topic they choose and the assembles tourists, hecklers and genuinely interested people.

    It is something of a pity that most speakers these days are the worst kind of evangelicals who lack wit and indeed wisdom. Political arguments are generally far more interesting to watch.

    At peak time there might be about a dozen little crowds surrounding each speaker - a good speaker can pull a good sized (100 or so) listeners. Most people think it is a complete 'free for all' but if a person is 'obscene' then they be stopped by the strong arm of the law.

    From there the park itself is the main attraction with the softball game, Serpentine Gallery and 1001 places for a picnic.

    Enjoy

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    • Arts and Culture

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