Knightsbridge, Kensington and Kensington Palace, London

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  • Gunpowder store
    Gunpowder store
    by toonsarah
  • New extension
    New extension
    by toonsarah
  • Reflections
    Reflections
    by toonsarah
  • HORSCHECK's Profile Photo

    The Royal Albert Hall and Albert Memorial

    by HORSCHECK Updated May 4, 2014

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    Royal Albert Hall

    The elliptical Royal Albert Hall is a renowed venue for a wide variety of entertainment from classical music to sporting events. It has a capacity of approximately 5000.

    The Italian Renaissance style building was completed in 1871. Just opposite to the Albert Hall, the Albert Memorial can be found. The elaborate monument was built in 1876 and recently restored.

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    Serpentine Gallery

    by toonsarah Updated Apr 14, 2014

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    Serpentine Gallery
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    Update April 2014: link to new second gallery and additional photo

    The Serpentine Gallery has no permanent collections, but instead shows a programme of modern and contemporary art exhibitions. Admission to these is free, and details of what’s on at any particular time can be checked on the gallery’s website (below). We particularly enjoy the photographic exhibitions, but you may also find sculpture or paintings on show. Most exhibitions last a couple of months – and between them the gallery is closed, so do check what, if anything, is on before making a special visit. Or if you're taking a walk through Kensington Gardens or nearby Hyde Park, why not detour to see if there's anything here of interest.

    As well as the exhibitions, there are various talks and other events. The gallery is open daily, 10.00AM – 6.00PM. Nearby is a new second gallery, the Serpentine Sackler - see my separate review.

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    Serpentine Sackler Gallery

    by toonsarah Written Apr 14, 2014

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    Gunpowder store
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    I have already written about the Serpentine Gallery in Kensington Gardens. In September 2013 a new gallery, operated as part of this and named the Serpentine Sackler Gallery, opened just a few minutes’ walk away. This is located in an old gunpowder store (dating back to 1805), known as the Magazine, which was designed as a store for the safe keeping of gunpowder during the Napoleonic wars. It has now been adapted for use as a gallery and extended by Zaha Hadid, a remarkable Iraqi-British architect with a distinctive style. I love her designs, although they are not to everyone’s taste – check out the firm’s website to see what you make of them.

    In this case her modern extension forms the gallery’s restaurant while the old gunpowder store is the venue for the changing exhibitions. The building retains much of its former character and as admission is free is worth a visit in its own right even if the current exhibition doesn’t appeal.

    Talking of exhibitions, there are four a year (changing with the seasons) which are planned to coordinate with the four at the original Serpentine Gallery nearby.

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    Let kids run riot at the Diana memorial playground

    by CatherineReichardt Updated Jun 30, 2013

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    The pirate ship jungle gym, Kensington Gardens
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    We know from our own experience that visiting large cities with younger kids can often be a bit of a trial, as there can be limited safe and affordable opportunities for them to let off steam. So the Diana Memorial Playground in Kensington Gardens is a wonderful option to have in your 'back pocket' when you can sense that your offspring are reaching overload from being cooped up indoors! This would be a particularly good option for breaking up the day if you were planning to bring your children to one of the spectacular museums in South Kensington (Natural History, Science, Victoria & Albert), which are brilliant but can be a bit overwhelming for a full day: it's only about 15 minutes walk, most of it through the park.

    The playground - which opened in 2000 - is a truly wonderful resource and a fitting tribute to a woman who unquestionable had an affinity with children. The centrepiece is a jungle gym in the form of a pirate ship, which is particularly apt given that Kensington Gardens is also home to the Peter Pan statue with commemorates J.M. Barrie (author of Peter Pan) - see my other travel tip. It is superbly designed - including a concrete crocodile reclining in nearby shallows and a treasure chest (thankfully securely locked) - and would keep any child happy for hours!

    The pirate ship is the main event, but there are also many other attractions such as an encampment of Red Indian teepees (presumably where Tiger Lily lives?), a water feature that kids can play in, sound sculptures and all manner of things to bounce on, clamber over/under/through and slide down.

    The playground is well landscaped with lots of vegetation to hide in. As a result, there is quite a lot of small wildlife - squirrels and a range of birds - which enchanted my children: these will be familiar to anyone living in Northern Europe, but paradoxically, since we live in Africa, grey squirrels seemed really exotic to my lot!

    Sad to say, one of the highlights of the playground is the security (which sounds like a very South African concern, but a very real consideration in any big city with the risk of pedophiles using them as stalking grounds). The playground is securely fenced, and although entrance is free, adults can only enter if they are accompanying children (except for one hour in the morning). Conversely, children have to be accompanied by an adult so that the playground cannot be used as an unsupervised childcare facility. There are also good on site toilet facilities.

    The best - and most cost effective - option if you're planning to stay for any time would be to bring your own picnic. However, if you're not that well organised, there is also an on site cafe which epitomises the sort of moneyed clientele that the playground attracts: organic produce, several vegetarian options, lots of goat's cheese and rocket with everything! Not that there's necessarily anything wrong with that, but it did make me smile that the menu would so clearly betray the priveleged demographic!

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    KENSINGTON PALACE GARDENS

    by davidjo Written Feb 12, 2013

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    the gatehouse at the northern end
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    Kensington Park Gardens is located west of Kensington Park and is home to many embassies and Kensington Palace, making it one of the most expensive real estate areas in the world. The London Cage was located here-the M19 spy center that was used during WWII and the cold war. The tree-lines mile long avenue averages £22m for a property there, but most are embassies and ambassador residences. The road was originally built in 1840 and named Queen Anne Road, but was renamed in 1870 when the trees were planted. The freehold is owned by the Crown but long leases are given to private buyers. The Indian Tycoon, Lakshmi Mital, at one time the 4th richest man in the world bought a property leasehold for £57m. Many famous residents have owned property there including Rothchild, Reuter, Bernie Ecclestone, Khalili, the Saudi Royal Family, the Sultan of Brunei.

    There is a gatehouse at each end and i used to drive through there years ago but i am not sure if this is still possible.

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    PRINCESS DIANA MEMORIAL PLAYGROUND

    by davidjo Written Feb 12, 2013
    the pirate ship
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    This can be found in the north east corner of Kensington Park, but only adults with children may enter. It was opened in 2000 at a cost of £1.7m and some of the features are based on Peter Pan, the highlight being a pirate ship which children can clamber over. There are also slides, swings and an area for disabled children.

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    ELFIN OAK---KENSINGTON GARDENS

    by davidjo Written Feb 12, 2013

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    alive with mythical creatures and tiny animals

    The Elfin Oak is a 900 year old tree stump surrounded by a cage, located near Black Lion Gate at the north west end of Kensington Gardens. Elfs, gnomes and small animals have been carved into the stump so it looks like the stump is home to these creatures. The stump originally came from Richmond Park and was relocated here in 1928 and it took the artist, Ivor Innes two years to carve the small creatures that now inhabit the stump. The creatures are painted from time to time.

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    the Boundary

    by davidjo Written Feb 11, 2013
    boundary stone

    As you walk northwards on the Broad Walk you will come across a worn old marker stone that nobody takes much notice of but if i remember correctly it marks the boundary of Paddington and Kensington, but i am not sure if the boundary is still in the same place today.

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    KENSINGTON PALACE---THE ORANGERY

    by davidjo Written Feb 11, 2013
    entrance to the Orangery
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    The Orangery was built in the 18th century for Queen Anne who hosted lavish dinners. Now it is a restaurant famous for providing high teas as well as breakfast and lunches with delicious home made food and cakes.
    There are some magnificent conifer trees as you approach the entrance.

    open 9 am- 6pm March to September and 10am to 5 pm during the rest of the year. There are also set serving times for the various mealtimes.

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    KENSINGTON PALACE--the SUNKEN GARDEN

    by davidjo Written Feb 11, 2013

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    The sunken gardens must be seen in the summer to appreciate the care taken in planting all the colourful flowers. It is sometimes known as the Dutch Garden and many tulips can be found in symmetry around the edges in springtime.

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    KENSINGTON PALACE---RESIDENTS

    by davidjo Written Feb 11, 2013
    a wintery day
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    Kensington Palace is the official home of Zara Phillips, the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester, the Duke and Duchess of Kent, and the Prince and Princess Michael of Kent. The original building was constructed in the early 17th century by the Earl of Nottingham but in 1669 King William III took it over as he wanted to get some clean air as he suffered from asthma in central London. Kensington was a small village outside London back in those days. Sir Christopher Wren extended the palace and for 70 years the British monarchs resided there, but Queen Mary died of smallpox there while a few years later King William fell of his horse and died a little later in the palace. George II was the last monarch to reside in the palace.

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    QUEEN VICTORIA STATUE, KENSINGTON GARDENS

    by davidjo Written Feb 11, 2013
    QUEEN VICTORIA in the snow

    She proudly sits at the back entrance of Kensington Palace for all to see. Her own daughter, Princess Louise was the sculpture who celebrated 50 years of her mother's reign. Victoria, herself was born in 1819 at Kensington Palace in a room now known as the north drawing room.

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    THE ROUND POND at KENSINGTON GARDENS

    by davidjo Written Feb 11, 2013
    Icy Round Pond
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    The Round Pond is an ornamental lake facing Kensington Palace, but it is actually rectangular with an area 150m X 200m and 5m deep. It is the headquarters of the Model Yacht Sailing Association and in the summer you will find enthusiasts busy sailing their model yachts. There are quite a few variety of birds to be found on the pond and locals can be seen relaxing by the pond during warm summer days.

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    Kensington Gardens.

    by Regina1965 Updated Jan 15, 2013

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    The Italian Garden.
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    Kensington Gardens is a very lovely Royal park adjacent to Hyde Park. It is different from Hyde Park in that it is so ornate, with lovely statues and fountains - and Kensington Palace, which is where Princess Di lived after divorcing Prince Charles - I add a photo of the gate to the palace where people put heaps of flowers after she died. Queen Victoria was born in Kensington Palace and there is a statue of her by the palace.

    Kensington Gardens were a part of Hyde Park until 1689.

    There is an entrance to the park from Bayswater road by Queensway, where you enter into the beautiful Italian Garden with its ornate fountains, urns and statues. This garden was a gift to Queen Victoria from her husband Prince Albert.

    The part of The Serpentine that is in Kensington Gardens is called The Long Water. There is another lake in the park called The Round Pond, they were given very simple names :)

    There is a small gallery in Kensington Gardens, The Serpentine Gallery, where one can visit exhibitions. Free entrance.

    There are lovely statues at Kensington Gardens, f.ex. the Peter Pan statue and Physical Energy (see my photo).

    Albert Memorial (see my next tip) is at the very end of Kensington Park by Kensington road.

    Opening hours: 06:00 - dusk.

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    St. Michael's Church

    by mikey_e Written Dec 20, 2012

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    St. Michael's Church
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    St. Michael’s Church is located in Belgravia and, despite its wealthy neighbourhood and interesting neo-Romanesque design, there doesn’t seem to be much of note written about it. Nevertheless, the church is a quaint stone structure that adds a bit of humility to an otherwise well-heeled area.

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