River Thames, London

4.5 out of 5 stars 214 Reviews

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  • A traffic free walk,busy with people.
    A traffic free walk,busy with people.
    by alectrevor
  • River Thames
    by mindcrime
  • view from Millennium Footbridge
    view from Millennium Footbridge
    by mindcrime
  • fred98115's Profile Photo

    Observation boat different perspective

    by fred98115 Written Jul 9, 2011

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    The Thames was a primary mode of transportation in olden days, so riding one of the observation boats connects you to how Londoners 500 years ago saw their town. In our case, it was a mode to take us from the Tower to the London Eye, a trip of about an hour or so one the river. We were able to see the major highlights, fortunately from a side seat since we were one the first on the boat. It is glass covered, however, so everyone can see, but if you want to take pictures then try for a window (river) seat. This is a nice ride, but, honestly, not our highest priority the next time we are in London.

    St. Stephen's Tower (the bell Big Ben is inside) Inside the boat One of the many bridges One of the many bridges Riverfront building
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  • Donna_in_India's Profile Photo

    View From The River...

    by Donna_in_India Updated Jun 3, 2011

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    We took the Thames River cruise that was included with our Big Bus Tour. It started at Tower of London pier and ended at the pier by the Parliament. It was absolutely freezing in early June but we enjoyed it anyway. Not very long, but enough of a taste of the river for me.

    Departure times vary, but are approximately every 20 minutes in the Summer and every 30-40 minutes in the Winter. You can board Tower Pier, Westminster Pier or Waterloo Pier.

    There are several other companies that offer river tours as well:

    Bateaux London - 7695 1800 - has dinner cruises with cabaret and dancing and a Sunday lunch cruise.

    Thames Cruises - 7928 9009 - has evening disco cruises.

    Thames River Services - 7930 4097 - has trips between Westminster and Greenwich.

    Catamaran Cruisers - 7695 1800 - departss Westminster Pier hourly (11 a.m. - 6 p.m.) for a 50 minute circular cruise with commentary in 9 languages. Also point-to-point hop-on/hop-off throught the day with boats leaving from Embankment, Waterloo (London Eye), Bankside, Tower, and Greenwich.

    I've previously taken the trip to Greenwich which I really enjoyed. I recommend taking even a short cruise to get a different perspective of London from the river.

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    Splash your Cash!

    by scottishvisitor Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    We didn't go on a river cruise on this trip (far too cold brrrrrr) & we couldn't find another 40 people to book with. The cruise costs 8.95 + vat & sails with a minimum of 40 people. A luncheon cruise is available for 27.95. If you prefer to take a bus tour you ticket price will incude a river cruise but on a much more modest vessel.
    If you have plenty of cash you can charter the boats for Weddings or Parties check out the website for prices.

    Throw a party in style Sail the Thames in Style
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    HMS Belfast

    by Blatherwick Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The HMS Belfast is a museum located on the Thames River that has been administered by the Imperial War Museum since 1971. In it's service life it was a Town-class light cruiser of the Royal Navy. Launched in March 1938, Belfast was the largest light cruiser ever built for the Royal Navy, with a displacement of 13,175 tons. She served with distinction during World War II, in which she participated in the sinking of the German battleship Scharnhorst, the Normandy Landings, and the force of Operation Zipper (intended to eject the Japanese from Malaya but turned into a relief operation by the Japanese surrender). During the last days of the war in Europe, she was spotted in the North Sea by a German submarine without being aware of it. The German captain decided not to fire however, since the war was almost over.

    She also served in the Korean War, in which her guns were used for shore bombardment in support of United Nations forces. She was decommissioned in 1963.

    HMS Belfast
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    Thames River cruise

    by Dabs Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    For a different perspective on London, take one of the many boat cruises that leave from either Westminster pier or Embankment pier.

    We had a beautiful sunny day so we went on the Catamaran Cruiser round trip from Embankment to Greenwich as it was included on the London Pass. Our cruise was narrated by a person (who pointed out at every opportunity that he was doing commentary for the tips) who did provide some interesting information about the sights along the river.

    Along the way you will see the London Eye and Houses of Parliament as it swings back to Westminster before heading to Greenwich, the Tower of London, OXO tower, the very modern city hall and much of the Gherkin and St. Paul's, go beneath the Tower Bridge, London Bridge and the wobbly bridge (Millennium Bridge). Passengers can get off at Greenwich or stay on board for the return journey.

    Seating was on the open air top deck and I believe there may have been more seating below deck. Try and get a seat along the railing if you want to snap photos.

    Alternatively, you can also use the Thames Clipper, which is a commuter service that goes as far as the O2 which is just past Greenwich. No commentary on this boat but it's more economical, you can save even more on the fare if you have a travelcard or Oyster card for London transport.

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    St Katharine's Dock

    by phil_uk_net Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    A peaceful little haven by the Tower. Like all docks along the Thames this was once a real, working dock up until fairly recently - in relative terms. In its heyday cargoes of ivory, shells, sugar, marble, wines, rubber, carpets, fragrant spices and perfumes would be brought into the capital from far-off, exotic sounding places.
    With the advent of containers and the demise of traditional shipping techniques the docks were closed in the 60's and 70's. They lay dormant for a while until development of the area commenced, leading to what we have today.
    The dock now exists as a yacht haven, residential and leisure area. There are small shops, bars and restaurants as well as some expensive real-estate. A very pleasant place to spend a few hours and eat lunch, perhaps.

    St Katharine's Dock
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  • cachaseiro's Profile Photo

    Take a river cruise.

    by cachaseiro Updated Feb 16, 2011

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    I took a river cruise from Greenwich to Westminster twice and found that it was a pretty cool way to see the city.
    You get a different perspective of a city when you see from the river.
    The company i went with is called city cruises and they were quite good.
    The tour guide was very funny eventhough he claimed he wasen't a tourguide.
    I have done the trip with people of all ages and it really suits all, so I would especially recommend it to families.

    River cruise. River thames My brother and me at the river cruise. My nice Sofie at the river cruise. Happy family cruising.
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  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    The Thames

    by kris-t Updated Jan 31, 2011

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    The Thames has a length of 346 kilometres (215 statute miles) with its source near the village of Kemble in the Cotswolds; it then flows through Oxford (where it is called the Isis, a truncation of its Latin name), Reading, Maidenhead, Eton and Windsor.

    From the time it leaves Wiltshire, where it rises, it has traditionally formed the county boundary, firstly between Berkshire on the south bank and Oxfordshire on the north, then between Berkshire and Buckinghamshire, Buckinghamshire and Surrey, Surrey and Middlesex, and between Essex and Kent. From the outskirts of Greater London, it passes Syon House, Hampton Court, and Richmond (with the famous view of the Thames from Richmond Hill), and Kew, before it passes through London proper, then Greenwich and Dartford before entering the sea in a drowned estuary, The Nore.

    Part of the area west of London is sometimes termed the Thames Valley whilst east of Tower Bridge development agencies and Ministers have taken to using the term Thames Gateway.

    The Thames The Thames The Thames The Thames The Thames
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  • TexasDave's Profile Photo

    Cleopatra's Needle

    by TexasDave Written Oct 18, 2010

    On the North side of the Thames, presented to England by the Viceroy of Egypt in 1819. This hieroglyph dates from 1500 B.C. and has a twin which stands behind the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.
    The bronze sphinxes at the base were added in 1882 but are not Egyptian.

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    HMS Belfast

    by pieter_jan_v Updated Oct 17, 2010

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    HMS Belfast is a light cruiser of the Southampton class, commissioned in 1939, that served the UK for 32 years and saw battle in WWII and the Korean war. In WWII she was hit by a mine, survived but it took three years to repair and modernize the ship.

    In 1971 she was converted into a museum ship as part of the the Imperial War Museum. She became the first ship to be preserved for the nation since Nelson’s ship the Victory.

    At many weekends foreign Navy ships at their London port visits are moored alongside HMS Belfast, often open to the public too.

    Admission fee: £12.95 (adult)

    Opening hours:
    1 March - 31 October: Daily 10AM - 6PM
    1 November - 28 February: Daily 10AM - 5PM

    HMS Belfast - London
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  • dustmon's Profile Photo

    Looking for Treasure on The Thames

    by dustmon Written Sep 6, 2010

    I had heard about Walks.com before, but just heard about something they do that sounds like alot of fun---for kids, teens and older folk as well---There is a woman who leads walks down the banks of the Thames River, where supposedly you can find Elizabethan age pipes, colored tiles from the Mediaeval times, or maybe even a 4000 year old tool---all along the river in the mud! I can assume that you should wear appropriate shoes ---much more info on all their different walks on the website walks.com

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  • Britannia2's Profile Photo

    St Katherines Dock

    by Britannia2 Updated Jan 3, 2010

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    1250 slum dwellings were cleared in 1825 to make St Katherines Dock as London became the worlds premier port and until the 1930s ships regularly made their way up to the Thames to the centre of London to berth. As ships grew larger and containerisation became the norm the docks closed and lay derelict for a number of years before regeneration of the area came in the 1970s.
    Today the dock is a wonderful place to sit and watch luxury craft move to and from the river from waterside restaurants, bars and cafes. There are a number of shops and the area is also home to many people who live here in the luxury homes around the dock.

    St Katherines Dock St Katherines Dock St Katherines Dock St Katherines Dock The Queens Barge in the dock
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  • csordila's Profile Photo

    Oxford-Cambridge Boat Race

    by csordila Updated Jun 12, 2009

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    Being the most remarkable educational centres of the world, the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge fight an intellectual race in the whole year. On an exceptional day, however, they use their body instead of their head – the battle is going on on Thames at this time.

    The first competition, founded by two friends, Charles Merivale learning in Cambridge and the Oxford student, Charles Wordsworth, the nephew of the famous poet William Wordsworth was organized in 1829, and turned into an international event by today.

    You have to join to the 250 000 enthusiastic fans on the coast or to the millions of tv viewers and enjoy the exciting fight of muscles! Be glad on the end, that you are not the helmsman of the winning team. They show their gratitude to him for the victory by thrown him into the ice cold water of the Thames.

    Update: Oxford beat Cambridge on the 2009 Boat Race (155th) by three-and-a-half lengths in a time of 17mins 0secs.

    Boat Race Course Oxford-Cambridge Boat Race
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  • Britannia2's Profile Photo

    River cruising on the Thames.

    by Britannia2 Updated May 24, 2009

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    We travelled from Westminster/Waterloo to Tower Pier at a cost of £6.90 with City Cruises and this is a good way to see London by seeing it from the river. The Thames is full of interest and other craft were constantly moving around on the river including other tourist boats , a police boat and luxury private craft.
    We thought the commentary on board was interesting and the boat was well appointed and appeared to be disabled friendly.
    The firm have an excellent website and it is full of good information including details of longer voyages.

    On the Thames
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  • davido7236's Profile Photo

    HMS Belfast

    by davido7236 Written Apr 22, 2009

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    An interesting afternoon's trip, in an area which has been revitalised. There are many bars and restaurants locally and the view of the river is great from there. We really enjoyed looking round the boat and seeing the guns. It's easy to get to as well via tube to London Bridge. The ship is a historic cruiser from WW2 which participated in the sinking of the German battle cruiser Scharnhorst in the Atlantic.

    HMS Belfast from near Hays Galleria North Bank of the Thames from near HMS Belfast
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