Royal and Ceremonial London, London

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  • Admiral arch.
    Admiral arch.
    by londontraveller01
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    Palace of Westminster
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey
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    by balhannah
  • lina112's Profile Photo

    Albert Memorial

    by lina112 Written Apr 26, 2010

    The Albert Memorial is a monument built in memory of Prince Albert, consort of Queen Victoria. Queen Victoria ordered the construction of the monument, built in Gothic style by Gilbert Scott in 1861, shortly after the death of Prince Albert. The Albert Memorial was laid in the south of Hyde Park and close to other places associated with Prince Albert as the Royal Albert Hall. The Albert Memorial can be seen no less than 169 sculptures of various characters known from four continents: Europe, Asia, America and Africa.

    El Albert Memorial es un monumento construido en memoria del príncipe Albert, consorte de la Reina Victoria. El monumento fue mandado construir por la Reina Victoria y erigido, en estilo neogótico, por Gilbert Scott en 1861, poco después de la muerte del príncipe Albert. El Albert Memorial se colocó en la zona sur de Hyde Park, y próximo a otro de los lugares relacionados con el príncipe Albert como es el Royal Albert Hall. En el Albert Memorial se pueden observar nada menos que 169 esculturas de diversos personajes conocidos de cuatro continentes: europeo, asiático, americano y africano.

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    Daytrip to Warwick Castle

    by Dabs Updated Sep 1, 2008

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    2nd visit August 2008

    Warwick Castle can be visited on a long day trip from London, this is one of my favorite castles that I've visited and they have activities going on during the day that are entertaining for both adults and kids. The weekends in summer tend to have the most activities but I imagine they are also the most crowded.

    There are several different ways to visit Warwick Castle:

    Several companies run day trips out to Warwick by bus, these are more expensive than independent travel and also include other stops in Oxford and Stratford.

    If you opt for independent travel, the journey takes about 1 hr 40 minutes by train. If you are just planning on spending the day you can get a "cheap" day return, we purchased 2 for 1 tickets in advance from Lastminute.com, you can also get a slight discount by booking on the castle's website, plus you can avoid the queues. The Castle is just a short 15 minute walk from the train station.

    Or if you want to try and combine a visit to Warwick with Stratford, there was a Shakespeare Explorer pass for either 1 or 3 days that allowed you to go into Warwick and out of Stratford (or vice versa). As seeing the castle properly takes at least 4 hours, unless you get a really early start on the day, you really can't do justice to both places in one day.

    I posted some additional tips and pics on my Warwick page.

    Warwick Castle
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    Daytrip to Windsor Castle/Eton

    by Dabs Updated Sep 1, 2008

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    If you are spending more than 3 or 4 days in London, I would highly recommend a day trip out to one of the castles/palaces that are easily reachable from London via train. Windsor Castle is one of my three favorites that are close to London (the other two are Hampton Court and Warwick Castle), the trip takes about 35-40 minutes from London and can easily be a full day trip should you want to do some shopping, wander over to Eton or take a boat trip on the Thames River. Or a 1/2 day if you get an early start and all you want to see is the castle.

    I've been out to Windsor several times on a daytrip from London, twice to take other people who hadn't seen it, twice on my own. Windsor is a quintessential castle, beautiful architecture, lots of history and lots to see inside the castle.

    For more information on what to see in Windsor and how to get there, please see my Windsor page.

    Windsor Castle
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    Changing of the Horse Guards--Brilliant!

    by laforstraveller Updated Jun 26, 2008

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    I think that the Horse Guards put on a much better show than the changing of the guards at Buckingham Palace. Because of this, I've ranked them as #8 on my "Top 10 Things to do in London" list. With the Horse Guards, you can get much more "up close and personal" to the action. You're not 20 people deep in a crowd trying to catch of glimpse of the guards. Plus, I love horses. So, combining the pomp and circumstance of the changing of the guards with the beauty and grace of horses, and voila, you have a winner!

    All the horses are this deep chocolate brown (almost black) with black mane and tail. The guards are all dressed in red or black with these amazing gold helmets. The contrasts are striking. The building of the Horse Guards fronts the old Palace of Whitehall, and the changing of the horse guards has taken place here since 1649. Within the area that they perform the ceremony there are several "antique" cannons and some interesting statues.

    The changing of the horse guards begins everyday at 11 AM (but Sunday--10:30 AM). They'll post a sign if it's been cancelled or temporarily postponed for the day. The day that my mom and I tried to see the Horse Guards in May 2008, their ceremony had been cancelled but they were still holding inspections that afternoon at 4 PM. We unfortunately weren't able to make it back in time to see it. The pictures posted were from my trip with my husband in Feb 2003.

    Changing of the Horse Guards Horse Guard Changing of the Horse Guards 2 Wonder if this cannon works or is just pretty? Statue
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    Lovely on a sunny day for a picnic.

    by shizzler Written May 14, 2008

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    Go to Kensington gardens and the royal Albert hall, they're just across the road from each other and you've got plenty of stuff to do in hyde park opposite the hall. Have a picnic if the weather's good, explore the park and just have a look around. Stroll through the park to the opposite corner to marble arch if feeling energetic.

    Royal Albert memorial. Royal Albert hall. Royal Albert hall from up close. Albert memorial.
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    A Royal Walk

    by Wowmoment Updated Mar 23, 2008

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    Or as we say in England - A Right Royal Walk.

    Follow the link for details of a walk around Big Ben; Westminster Abbey; Buckingham Palace etc.

    Takes about 3 hours

    http://www.londonforfree.net/walks/royal/royal.shtml

    Big Ben and the River Thames Buckingham Palace

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    Admiralty Arch

    by yurxlnc Updated Feb 3, 2008

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    There are so many wonderful buildings to see in London; but last time I was struck by this place Admiralty Arch. It leads from the southwest corner of Trafalgar Square into The Mall. The ceremonial gateway has five arches and is one of London's most famous landmarks. Its name comes from the Royal Navy headquarters nearby .
    It was designed by Sir Aston Webb (who also worked on Buckingham Palace and the Victoria and Albert Museum). It was built to provide an elegant ceremonial passage from busy Trafalgar Square to Buckingham Palace. Traffic does not pass through the massive central arch, which is only opened for state occasions. The small outer arches are for pedestrians, and the remaining central arches for cars etc.
    The inscription in Latin shows that the Arch was commissioned by King Edward VII in memory of his mother, Queen Victoria.

    the arch close up of the inscription and the arches.
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    Trooping of the Colour

    by clouds111 Updated Nov 6, 2007

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    The Trooping of the Colour occurs every year and is great example of traditional English pomp and pageantry. Although dating back to the 17th century, a tradition of British infantry regiments first performed during the reign of Charles II, it now marks the Queen's official birthday in June. The Queen and members of the Royal family attend in person to watch the regiments parade their colours in Horse Guards Parade.

    If you're lucky enough to get close enough to watch it, its great fun and makes me feel proud to be British. Alternatively every year the BBC broadcasts the military parade live for all to see.

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    Horse Guards Parade

    by bren1125 Written Sep 14, 2007

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    For a chance to see the Queen's Life Guard, head for the seperate ceremony that takes place daily throughout the year at Horse Guards Parade, Whitehall.

    A colorful spectacle that last about 25 minutes. The guard march from Hyde Park Corner via Constitution Hill and the Mall to Horse Guards Parade.

    It takes place daily at 11:00 am (Mon-Sat) and 10 am on Sunday

    No charge.

    Queen's Life Guard
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    Changing of the Guards

    by leffe3 Updated Jun 17, 2007

    Takes place every day at 11am (10am on Sunday) - foot soldiers (the Foot Guards) at Buckingham Palace, mounted guards (Household Cavalry) at Horse Guards Parade.

    These guys have been protecting the monarchy since 1660. From 1689 to 1837, the sovereign lived in St James' Palace. When Queen Victoria moved to Buckingham Palace, the Household Cavalry remained at St James, the Foot Guards went off up the road.

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    Changing of the Guards

    by cheezecake_deli Written Dec 30, 2006

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    The history of the Horse Guards began in the early 16th century, when Henry VIII commissioned a jousting ground on the present site of the Horse Guards building off Whitehall. A century later, Charles II established the Horse Guards as a trusted royal miliary guard and built its first building to house over a hundred horses. The Horse Guards are divided into the Household Cavalry and Foot Guards (or Tiltyard Guards), and wear a distinctive red uniform. Two Cavalry sentries stand guard at the Whitehall entrance everyday, attracting lots of tourists' attention. The Guards change daily at the Horse Guards building (10 am on Mondays to Saturdays and 11 am on Sundays). Entry is free of charge.

    I wonder what he's thinking?!
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    The Horse Guards Parade

    by smschley Updated Oct 27, 2006

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    The Horse Guards Parade is the second most popular ceremony outside of the Changing of the Guard. In fact, the two mounted cavalry regiments of the Queens Household Regiments, who march in the Changing of the Guard, make up the Horse Guards Parade. The parade happens every Monday through Saturday at 11.00am and on Sundays at 10.00am. It takes place outside the Horse Guards Building on Whitehall, which was built in 1745 to house the old palace guards

    The Guards (Queen's Life Guards) ride along the Mall between Horse Guards parade and Hyde Park.

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    Town Crier

    by easyoar Updated May 24, 2006

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    In days gone by, before there were Public Address Systems and microphones and News Programmes on the TV, the way news was spread about a large town/city was to have a Town Crier who went through the town with his bell shouting out the proclamation he had been tasked with telling the population.

    This is the current London Town Crier. I believe he has been in the role for several decades (he did tell me exactly how long, but I have forgotten the precise figure). Of course his role is pretty much just ceremonial these days, but is part of the pageantry of London that is still kept alive that many people may miss. The best way to see him is to either get lucky (I have seen him a few times), or to try and find an event he attends (such as the Pearly Kings Harvest Festival).

    London Town's Crier
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    Chelsea Pensioner

    by easyoar Updated May 24, 2006

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    These days, most people associate Chelsea with Englands (currently) most successful Football Team. However A Chelsea Pensioner is NOT something ex-Chelsea players become when they get old (I can't see Frank Lampard or John Terry joining their ranks...). Chelsea is an area in London (a rather well to do area as it happens). The Chelsea Pensioners are old soldiers who live together in an Old Soldiers Home (unsurprisingly based in Chelsea). As with the Town Crier, they are part of London's heritage and you can often see them at ceremonies such as Trooping the Colour or the Pearly Kings Harvest Festival.

    The Chelsea Pensioners live in the Royal Hospital, Chelsea. The building itself was designed by Sir Christopher Wren in 1682.

    A Cheery Chelsea Pensioner
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  • Wellington Arch

    by Mariajoy Updated May 20, 2006

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    Built in the 1820s Wellington Arch was one of a pair by the architect Decimus Burton, celebrating and commemorating Britains victory over Napoleonic France - the other one is, of course Marble Arch.

    Originally built as the entrance to Buckingham Palace it is now possible to pay a £3 entry to climb to the top for views over the Royal parks. There are three floors inside telling its fascinating history.

    The Arch was once topped with a statue of Wellington on his horse (the largest horse statue ever commissioned) but it was highly unpopular and when the arch itself was dismantled and moved (due to a massive road improvement scheme) in 1912, it was seen as an opportunity to replace it with the "Quadriga" a four horse chariot at full speed, driven by the Winged figure of Peace - by sculptor Adrian Jones.

    Opening Hours:
    Wed-Sun & Bank Hols 10am - 4pm (5pm from 1st April)

    Wellington Arch and the Quadriga

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