St. James's and The Mall, London

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  • St James's Park, London
    St James's Park, London
    by antistar
  • St James's Park, London
    St James's Park, London
    by antistar
  • St James's Park, London
    St James's Park, London
    by antistar
  • Britannia2's Profile Photo

    Waterloo Place

    by Britannia2 Written May 24, 2015

    Waterloo Place is is an elegant street leading from Lower Regent Street and then down steps and in to The Mall. A short walk between Picadilly Circus and The Mall. Waterloo Place, like Regent Street , was designed by John Nash.
    At the top of Waterloo Place is a tall Tuscan pillar with the Duke of York on its plinth. It is 120 feet high and was constructed in the 1830s.
    Here you will also see statues of Edard V11, the Memorial to the Crimea - the broken cannon at the back of the plinth is actual broken Russian guns from Sevastopol. There is also a statue to Lord Herbert of Lea and a very good statue of Florence Nightingale.

    Waterloo Place The steps from Waterloo Place to The Mall
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    Chatham House

    by Britannia2 Updated May 24, 2015

    On the corner of St James Square and Duke of York Street is Chatham House. This was once Englands home of the Primeminister - an early sort of 10 Downing Street. The residence of our leaders for over two centuries from Chatham to Gladstone.
    News of Wellingtons victory at Waterloo was brought here to the Foreign Secretary , Lord Castlereagh, who was dining here with the Prince Regent. Their meal was suddenly paused when the sound of a coach and four thundered over the cobbles of the square to bring the news. Today there is little traffic and the house is now the home of the Royal Institute of International Affairs.

    Chatham House
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    PC Yvonne Fletcher memorial

    by Britannia2 Written May 24, 2015

    In 1984 a protest outside the Libyan Embassy in St James Square turned to tradgedy when Libyan extremists inside the building fired without warning at a group of anti Libyan protesters in the square. A police officer on duty and unarmed was shot and died an hour later of her injuries - she was PC Yvonne Fletcher who was just 25 years old.
    Today 30 years on there are still fresh flowers placed on her memorial in the north east corner of the square where PC Fletcher died. The then English primeminster , Margaret Thatcher, unveiled the memorial on February 1, 1985.

    PC Yvonne Fletcher memorial

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    St James Palace

    by Britannia2 Updated Apr 24, 2015

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    This is the London residence of several minor members of the royal family and is found on The Mall close to Buckingham Palace. It was built between 1531 and 1536 in red-brick, the palace's architecture is primarily Tudor in style.
    It is a working palace today and despite the monarch living in Buckingham Palace the Royal Court is still formally based here. It is also the London residence of the Princess Royal, Princess Beatrice of York, Princess Eugenie of York and Princess Alexandra.
    The complex also includes York House and Clarence House which is the home of the Prince of Wales.
    It is also used for hosting official receptions for visiting heads of state.

    St James Palace The tower In the courtyard From The Mall

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    THE OLDEST BARBER'S SHOP ON THE PLANET

    by davidjo Updated Oct 24, 2014

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    Truefitt and Hill, Gentlemen's Hairdresser's and Perfumers was established in 1805, as the sign proudly announces. William Truefitt became the hairdresser to the British Royal Court and received their first royal warrant from king George III. In 1911 Truefitt merged with Edwin Hill in Old Bond Street, but moved to their present location at 71 St. James's St in 1994, and maintain a famous customers from the Royal Family, Ambassadors, MPs and visiting dignitaries. The sign above the entrance indicates that they have a Royal Warrant by appointment of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. If you look in the shop window you will see every type of razor, shaver, mugs, brushes and foam imaginable.
    www.truefittandhill.co .uk will show you a selection of items available and such services as wet shave, facial and hair treatment, haircut, shampoo and manicure for £149 or a cut throat shave a mere £80.

    by Royal appointment established 1805 shaving equipment (sorry about the reflection)
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    A stroll in the park

    by slothtraveller Written Feb 12, 2014

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    St James's Park is a pretty royal park nestled between Birdcage Walk and the Mall. It is London's oldest royal park and is situated between Buckingham Palace and Horse Guards Parade so you can walk through it to get from one of these landmarks to the other.
    The park is home to a lake with two islands which attract lots of birdlife. Indeed, there is supposed to be a colony of pelicans in the park, but they were nowhere to be seen when I visited. Even in February during my visit, the park is kept beautifully with some very colourful flowerbeds. There is a great view of the London Eye and Horse Guards Parade visible from beside St James's Park Lake.

    View of Horse Guards over Duck Lake Birdlife aplenty! Those colourful flowerbeds Warning not to feed the pelicans! Walking towards Horse Guards Parade
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    St. James's Park

    by antistar Written Jul 1, 2013

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    Ducks, Geese, Pigeons... birds... I even saw a Heron chasing a craven Seagull in a slow soar and dive. The Seagull had the Heron's chick in its beak. The chase ended when a crow, possibly thinking it might somehow share the meal, attacked the parent not the baby snatcher.

    It was perhaps a throwback to earlier times in St James's Park, where less prosaic animals were kept inside its boundaries. Gone are the camels, elephants of crocodiles of King James I. Gone too are the debauched creatures of John Wilmot's ramble through the park in 1672.

    "And nightly now beneath their shade
    Are buggeries, rapes, and incests made.
    Unto this all-sin-sheltering grove
    Whores of the bulk and the alcove,
    Great ladies, chambermaids, and drudges,
    The ragpicker, and heiress trudges.
    Carmen, divines, great lords, and tailors,
    Prentices, poets, pimps, and jailers,
    Footmen, fine fops do here arrive,
    And here promiscuously they swive."

    Today it's filled with families feeding the ducks and enjoying the algae strewn waters of the lake, stretching as it does from the political power of Downing Street to the imperial power of Buckingham Palace.

    St James's Park, London St James's Park, London St James's Park, London St James's Park, London St James's Park, London

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    St James Palace

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Jun 26, 2013

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    St James' Palace is one of London's oldest palaces. It is situated in Pall Mall, just north of St James's Park. Although no sovereign has resided there for almost two centuries, it has remained the official residence of the Sovereign and the most senior royal palace in the UK. For this reason it gives its name to the Royal Court . It is the ceremonial gathering place of the Accession Council, which proclaims a new sovereign.
    St. James’s Palace was built by Henry VIII in the 1530s and was home to several famous sovereigns: Elizabeth I, Charles I and George I, II and III. The palace was rebuilt soon after but never recovered its former glory, and Queen Victoria formalised the move in 1837.
    So, whilst Buckingham Palace remains the official residence of Her Majesty the Queen, St. James’s Palace retains the formal rooms for receptions, weddings and occasions of State.

    You can watch my 3 min 48 sec Video London walk part 2 out of my Youtube channel or here on VT.

    St James Palace St James Palace
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  • Regina1965's Profile Photo

    St James´s Park - The Oldest Royal Park.

    by Regina1965 Updated Jan 5, 2013

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    St James´s Park is the oldest Royal Park in London and is surrounded with beautiful buildings and palaces; Buckingham Palace, St James´s Palace and Clarence House, Westminster, the Horseguards, the Old Admiralty buildings, the Foreign and Commonwealth Offices and the Cabinet War Rooms. The Clarence House is the official residence of Prince Charles and Camilla and Prince William and Prince Harry.

    History of the park: In 1531 King Henry VIII acquired the park and in 1603 King James I introduced wild animals (menagerie) to the park. In 1660 King Charles II changed the park into a Frency style park. In 1663 the Horsequards was constructed and in 1703 Buckingham house was built by the park, and has served as the Royal Residence of the Monarchs since 1837. In 1827 King George IV reconstructed the park to what it looks like today. In 1905 the Queen Victoria Memorial Garden by the palace was created.

    There is a lovely lake, St James´s park lake, with fountains at the park with myriad of birds - I saw pelecans and black swans on the lake. The pelecans have been in the park since 1667 when exotic birds were brought to the park. There is a small island in the lake, Duck Island, a nature reserve for the birds at the park. There is such a cute little cottage, built in 1841, on Duck Island, which served as the home for the bird-keeper. It now houses offices.

    There is a fantastic view of Whitehall from the Blue bridge. Some of the buildings there join together at this point and look like a big castle with a lot of pinnacles. It is a great photo opportunity.

    There is a restaurant at the park called Inn the Park restaurant (a play on words).

    The park is open daily from 5:00 until midnight.

    Here is a map of St James´s Park.

    The view of Whitehall - it looks like a castle. The fantastic view from the bridge of Whitehall. The cute little Duck Island cottage. The pelicans at St James��s Park. Inn the Park Restaurant.

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    Guard Division Memorial

    by mikey_e Written Dec 11, 2012

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    The Guards Division Memorial is a monument dedicated to those British soldiers who lost their lives in the First World War. It was designed by Gilbert Ledward in the 1920s and is similar to many other memorials that were erected for the fallen in WWI, at least within the Commonwealth countries. The memorial has a line of soldiers, realist sculptures that are intended to provoke reflection on the human toll of the hostilities and of warfare in general. Wreaths are often laid here in commemoration of the fallen.

    The Memorial Closer view of the Memorial A close-up of the sculpted soldier
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    St. James Birds

    by mikey_e Written Dec 10, 2012

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    Normally, birds would not elicit such a “must-see” billing. Nevertheless, birds have a special history of their own in St. James Park, one connected with royalty. While the ducks and other native birds were undoubtedly brought to the park to enhance its Englishness, the colony of Pelicans here was gifted by the Russian Ambassador in 1664 to the King of England. They remain in the park to this day, a tribute to the tradition of gifting exotic and unusual animals. The more mundane ducks that have also colonized the park have given their name to the small island amid the artificial lake, which is currently called Duck Island.

    The famous exotic birds Ducks

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    Central Park

    by mikey_e Written Dec 10, 2012

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    Every city needs a large green space in its core, and London seems to have these in spades. Nevertheless, St. James Park seems to occupy a special place, as it is in the heart of British pomp and power. Bounded by the Mall, Buckingham Palace, the FCO headquarters and the Ministry of Defense, among other institutions, the Park can only be seen as a spot of tranquility and calm among hordes of frantic and pressured civil servants. The Park has had royal patronage since its purchase by Henry VIII in the 16th century, although it was not always intended to be such an idyllic green spot. Under Henry VIII, it was drained and used as a place for exotic animal. This was followed by a plan to create a French-style garden with a canal, which was followed by its usage as pasture in the 17th and 18th centuries. In the early 19th century, the Park took its current form, with the canal replaced by a more naturally looking lake, and landscaping that reflected more the British ideal of a pastoral setting, rather than the French, high-managed concept of royal gardens. Today, the Park is open to the public and is a popular spot for both ambling locals and curious tourists, drawn undoubtedly by its greenery and by its quaint cottage on Duck Island.

    St. James Park Feeding the squirrels St. James Park The lake Duck Island Cottage
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    Stomping Ground

    by mikey_e Written Dec 10, 2012

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    The Mall is one of those monumental stomping grounds that are so common in capitals of former Empires. While military parades may be few and largely ceremonial these days, the Mall is nevertheless still an impressive part of London, and a site that cannot fail to evoke the grandeur that once was associated with the Royal House and with the seat of government and the state. The Mall creates a large open space in central London that contrasts with the otherwise dense and frenetic core, a place in which the usual energies of the capital give way to the stately pace of tradition and formality. Bounded by Buckingham Palace, St. James Park, the Admiralty Arch and the Institute of Contemporary Arts, the Mall was a 20th century creation meant to keep up with the Joneses – in this case, other imperial capitals. Although it is unlikely that visitors will find the Mall packed with anything other than tourists most days of the year, it still comes alive with official events and celebrations.

    The Mall View onto the Mall Statue and entrance to the Park West End of the Mall
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    QUEEN'S CHAPEL

    by davidjo Written Dec 3, 2012

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    The Queen's Chapel is located adjacent to St. James's Palace and was designed in the 1620s by Inogo Jones, even though Catholic churches were prohibited in those days. Charles I built it for Henrietta Maria, his catholic wife, but since the 1690s it has been used as a protestant chapel.

    more info on the second photograph

    The Queen's Chapel more details
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    ST. JAMES'S PALACE

    by davidjo Written Dec 2, 2012

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    Although no sovereign has lived here for over 200 years it remains their official residence, St. James's Palace being one of the oldest in London. it was commissioned by Henry VIII and completed in 1536. Charles I slept their the night before his execution, Oliver Cromwell used it as barracks, In 1837 Queen Victoria officially ended its position as the number one residence of the monarchy and replaced by Buckingham Palace. Princess Diana's coffin was kept there for a few days.
    Nowadays it is still the residence of the Princess Royal, Princess Beatrix, Princess Alexandra and Lady Ogilvy.
    Unfortunately the palace is closed to the public

    the palace with clock and weather vane left of the main entrance one of the four courtyards
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