St. Pauls Cathedral, London

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St Pauls Churchyard, EC4 0 20 7236 4128

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  • St Paul's Cathedral, London
    St Paul's Cathedral, London
    by antistar
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    St Paul's Cathedral
    by RavensWing
  • St Paul's Cathedral
    St Paul's Cathedral
    by RavensWing
  • EasyMalc's Profile Photo

    London's Anglican Cathedral

    by EasyMalc Updated Jan 9, 2015

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The two best known churches in London have to be Westminster Abbey and St. Paul’s Cathedral, so if you only have time to visit one, which one should you choose?
    It’s a long time since I’ve been to Westminster Abbey but to my shame I’ve never been inside St. Paul’s. All around it no end of times - but never in it.
    Whereas Westminster Abbey can be best described as Gothic, St. Paul’s is very different and has been described as English Baroque, which seems a fair description to me even though I’m no expert on architectural terms. Depending on your preferences, that may help you to make a decision on which one to choose, but of course the differences don’t end there.
    Compared to the Norman design of Westminster Abbey the present St. Paul’s Cathedral is quite young in comparison and the reason is, as many people will already know, was that Sir Christopher Wren was commissioned to build a new church after the Great Fire of London of 1666.
    What perhaps not so many people know though, is that the church that was here before then was also Norman and was one of the biggest in Europe, if not the world, with a spire that reached close to 150m high. It wasn’t just the height of the church that made it impressive but also its length, so as you can imagine Wren had his work cut out to compete with that, and it definitely wasn’t all plain sailing.
    Obviously, you can read more about the history of the Cathedral and Sir Christopher Wren elsewhere, so I’ll concentrate on some of the more practical things that you should know about visiting this City of London landmark.
    Being slap bang in the centre of London means that getting here by public transport is really easy. Entering the Church is through the magnificent West Front and all the relevant information is available on the website which I recommend that you should take a look at before you come here.
    Sundays are reserved for worship only, but if, like me, you just want to visit the Cathedral to marvel at its architecture, then please note that photography is not permitted.
    It costs a hefty £17 for a full paying adult (Jan 2015), but if there are two of you and come to London by train you’ll qualify for 2 for1 admission if you fill out a voucher http://www.daysoutguide.co.uk/st-pauls-cathedral
    When you enter the Cathedral and take in the view down the nave you may not initially be as overwhelmed as you thought you might be, but the further down the church you go the more impressive it becomes.
    One thing I have to point out, especially for anyone not interested in British colonialism, is that the church is full of memorials to British military achievements. Much of this is down in the Crypt, but you should still come down here to see the tombs of Lord Nelson, the Duke of Wellington - and of course Sir Christopher Wren himself. There are also other notable people’s remains down here, as well as memorials to many famous British people. It has to be said though that I reckon that Westminster Abbey has many more famous names, from an international point of view than St. Paul’s.
    If you have the stamina you can climb the steps up to the galleries, which I have to confess I didn’t have the time (or inclination for).
    There’s no doubt that St. Paul’s Cathedral is a marvellous building with plenty of history, especially if you’re British. Apart from the people I’ve already mentioned, Sir Winston Churchill’s funeral was held here as was Margaret Thatcher’s - and of course Princess Diana married Prince Charles here.
    So do I recommend Westminster Abbey or St. Paul’s Cathedral? I’m bound to say both, but hopefully you’ll have a better idea on what to expect from St. Paul’s.

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    St pauls cathedral

    by sparkieplug24 Updated Jun 4, 2014

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    We visited St Pauls in the afternoon we took the bus to it from Westminster abbey. Well we walked along to near downing street to get the bus. Anyway St Pauls is a beautiful building both inside and out. You can get an audio tour guide from just inside the door which tell you all about the building and all the different parts of the building and this is included within the price and is visual as well as audio.

    The galleries

    if your physically able I highly recommend going up to the whisphering gallery to have a view down into the main cathedral floor. The whispering gallery is named as such because you can here someone whispher from the oppisite side of the gallery go on try it and see. Then once you have stopped for a few for a look and a rest if your able take the steps up the stone and golden galleries for stunning views across London.

    It should however be noted that the only access to the galleries is by stairs 257 up to the whisphering galleries, 376 to the stone galleries and 528 to the golden galleries. Therefor wheelchair users, those with visual disabilities or other mobility issues or health problems would have difficulty accessing these areas.

    In the crypt however their is a short video which is a virtual access view of the dome.

    The crypt is where the Tombs of many well known people are buried and where many memorials to the conflicts that shaped the British nation are housed within the cathedral . Those burided within the crypt Include Admiral Nelson who was killed at the battle of Trafalgar, Lord Wellington (aka as Duke of Wellington or the Iron Duke) as well as these famous soldiers of war the crypt also houses the tomb of Sir Christpher Wren the architect who designed St Pauls is also in the crypt. These are just a few of those who are remembered within the crypt.

    It should be noted that no pictures are permitted to be taken within the cathedral and this is closely monitored as this is a primarly a sight of worship and not a tourist attraction (although some may argue its to make more money out of tourist as they sell pictures of various parts of cathedral in the shop). It is permitted to take picutres in the stone gallery and golden galaries as this is outside.

    Entrance into the cathedral is £16 for adults, £7 for children £14 for concession. You can purchase tickets online that means you make a saving and fast track. St Pauls is included in the London Pass. these price were correct as of January 2014 and include the audio guide.

    There is of course a shop, Cafe and toilets located in the crypt.

    UPDATE as of April 2014 St Pauls is no longer included in the London Pass or 2for1 offers

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    a great renaissance church

    by mindcrime Updated May 28, 2014

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    The famous St. Paul’s Cathedral was built by Christopher Wren (it was completed in 1708) and as I read in all the London’s guide books this anglican cathedral is one of London's most visited sites. It's visible from many parts of London and you can find it at the financial district of London known as City.
    At the same site there used to be an old temple, then a wooden Saxon cathedral(7th century), then a stone cathedral(10th century), and the Old St. Paul’s cathedral(that was ruined by the Great Fire of 1666). It was rebuilt after the fire by Christopher Wren who is buried here at OBE chapel among other tombs and memorials.

    There is a charge to visit the interior (£16,50!!!) but it’s weird to give money for the churches in UK when so many great museums are for free). The Cathedral is open to visitors from Monday to Saturday 8.30-16.00 and you can also climb up to have some nice view of London. on Sundays it’s open for worship only.

    Filming and photography inside the Cathedral is not allowed but the exterior is great too.

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    Resurgam ~ 'I Shall Rise Again'.

    by HackneyBird Written May 14, 2014

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    Todays St Paul's Cathedral is the fifth cathedral to stand on Ludgate Hill and even earlier still the Romans are thought to have built a temple dedicated to Diana on this site.

    The first cathedral was made of wood. It was founded in 602 and dedicated to St Paul by Ethelbert of Kent, England's first Christian king. The cathedral was rebuilt in stone but burned down in 962 by the Vikings. The third cathedral was Saxon and was destroyed by fire in 1087. It was replaced with the Norman St Paul's, which became one of the largest buildings in England, considerably larger and higher than todays cathedral, and toped by the largest spire ever built. The spire was struck by lightening in 1561 and was never rebuilt. At the west end of the cathedral stood two great bell towers which were also used as prisons and at the east end was the Rose Window.

    In the early Middle Ages there was a law school within the precincts of the Old St Paul's, but in the 13th century Henry III forbade law being taught within the City of London so as to benefit the schools he had founded at Oxford. In 1285 the cathedral was enclosed by walls to keep out robbers and marauders. The course of these walls are defined today by Creed Lane, Ava Maria Close, Paternoster Row, Old Change and Carter Lane. There were six gates built into the walls, the main one being at Ludgate Hill.

    Over the years, many buildings were erected in the confines of the walls. These included a Chapter House surrounded by a two storey cloister, the remains of which can be seen in the gardens to the south side of the nave, St Gregory's Parish Church, the Bishop's Palace, the Pardon Churchyard, a College of Minor Cannons and St Faith's Chapel, which was demolished in the middle of the 13th century to lengthen the east end of the cathedral so it could accommodate the increasing number of clergy. This chapel was rebuilt in the crypt and, 700 years later, is still known as the Chapel of St Faith's. Also built were St Paul's School, Paul's Cross and the Jesus Bell Tower, which was a free standing campanile whose great bell called the people of London to a thrice yearly folk moot at Paul's Cross. Attendance to the moot was compulsory until the reign of Edward II. Paul's Cross was a wooden lead covered pulpit from which announcements of victories, royal marriages, excommunications and royal proclamations were issued; political speeches made; and sermons delivered. The congregation sat or stood in the open air. Paul's Cross was struck by lightening in 1325, but in spite of this it survived until the English Civil War, when it was destroyed by Order of Parliament in 1643.

    The old cathedral was destroyed by the Great Fire of London in 1666, but before then many famous people passed through its doors. In 1377 John Wycliffe was tried for heresy there, Richard II lay in state in 1400, Henry V prayed at the High Altar before he went to France and on his return gave thanks for his victory at Agincourt and Henry VII's eldest son Prince Albert married Catherine of Aragon there in 1501.

    The old St Paul's was also the location of the annual custom of electing a Boy Bishop. A choirboy was elected to take the place of the Bishop for a short time. He was dressed in full bishop's regalia and fulfilled many of the usual ceremonial functions, although he was not allowed to conduct mass. This custom was abolished by Henry VIII, briefly revived by Mary and abolished again by Elizabeth I.

    After the Great Fire of London the entire cathedral was reduced to ashes and Sir Christopher Wren was commissioned to build a new St Paul's. While he was picking through the ruins of the old cathedral he found part of a shattered tombstone on which was carved with the word Resurgam meaning, 'I shall rise again'. On 21 July 1675 he placed that stone to mark the spot of the new dome, and he also had the word Resurgam sculpted on the pediment of the south door underneath a phoenix rising from the flames. The new cathedral took 35 years to complete and when Sir Christopher Wren was 78, he was there to watch as his son was raised to the dome in a basket to place the final stone.

    Wren ran into an architectural problem when making the dome, if it was to be tall enough to impress from the outside, it would be too big for the interior. Wren's solution was to build three domes: a small one to be seen from the inside, a brick cone to support the ball and cross on top, and the famous timber framed, lead covered outer dome. The tip of the golden cross over the dome stands 365 feet above street level and there are fantastic view over London from the gallery beneath, which involves a climb of 627 steps. The dome itself has a span of 122 feet. The inner cupola of the dome is 218 feet above the cathedral floor and is decorated with frescoes telling the story of St Paul, painted by Sir James Thornton. Running around the inside of the inner dome is the Whispering Gallery, 100 feet above the floor of the cathedral, so called because a whisper on one side can be heard clearly on the other side 112 feet away.

    The only monument to survive from the old St Paul's is that of the poet John Donne, Dean of St Paul's from 1621 until his death in 1631. It now stands in the south aisle.

    The crypt covers the same space as the main body of the cathedral and is the largest crypt in Europe. Sir Christopher Wren was one of the first occupants, his tomb is marked by a plain marble slab. Also in the same area, know as Painter's Corner, are the tombs of Lord Leighton (1830-96), Edward Landseer (1802-73), Sir John Millais (1829-96), J M W Turner (1775-1851), Sir Joshua Reynolds (1723-92) and William Holman Hunt 91827-1910).

    Upstairs in the apse, behind the altar at the east end of the cathedral is the American Memorial Chapel, which commemorates members of the US forces based in Britain who died during the Second World War. The American Role of Honour contains 28,000 names and was presented by General Eisenhower in 1951.

    The two towers at the west end of the cathedral were added in 1707. The north west tower houses the second largest peel of bells in the world and the south west contains Great Paul, the largest bell in Britain, which rings out over London every day at 1pm. There is also the grand Geometric Staircase of 92 spiralling steps that leads up to the cathedral's library.

    St Paul's is the seat of the Bishop of London but it is also the venue for important national occasions. The state funerals of Lord Nelson, the Duke of Wellington and Sir Winston Churchill were held here as were service to mark the end of the First and Second World Wars and the Falklands War and a service of commemoration for 9/11. St Paul's has also hosted Queen Victoria's Jubilee celebrations, the wedding of Prince Charles and Lady Diana in 1981 and thanksgiving services for both the Golden Jubilee and 80th birthday of Queen Elizabeth II, and many other Royal occasions.

    The cathedral is said to be haunted by an elderly clergyman who appears in All Soul's Chapel, just by the visitors centre. This ghost has one strange characteristic in that when he appears he is whistling a high pitched tuneless whistle.

    St Paul's Cathdral. St Paul's Cathedral. St Pauls Cathedral. St Paul's Cathdral.
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    St Paul’s Cathedral

    by grayfo Updated Apr 23, 2014

    This famous church is actually at least the fourth St Paul’s. The first was built in 604 AD, but burned down and its replacement was lost to the Great Fire of London in 1666. This St Paul’s was designed by Sir Christopher Wren and took 35 years to construct, with one of the world’s largest domes. Take a walk up to the whispering gallery, pay a visit to the crypt or see a film telling of the cathedral’s history.

    Monday to Saturday: 8:30 am to 4:00 pm

    Adults: £16.00
    Children (6 to 17): £7.00

    email reception@stpaulscathedral.org.uk

    June 2013

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    Wren's masterpiece

    by toonsarah Updated Apr 16, 2014

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    Update April 2014: prices checked and corrected, practical information updated, new photos added

    I can’t quite believe that I have left it this long to write about St Paul’s Cathedral as it’s one of my favourite London sights! And to think that if it weren’t for a major historical disaster, we wouldn’t even have it! I’m talking about the Great Fire of London, in 1666 – the original St Paul’s was destroyed in the blaze and Sir Christopher Wren commissioned to design its replacement. Although in fact this is the fifth cathedral on this site – there has been one here since 604.

    When the Fire destroyed a large part of the city, Wren had the idea to use the opportunity to redesign it on what were then more “modern” ideas. His plan was never realised, but its centrepiece, a magnificent new cathedral, was. Although his initial design was modified several times, his vision for a grand domed cathedral on classical lines was broadly realised, though it took 36 years to build.

    Westminster Abbey may be the capital’s premier place of worship for state occasions, notably coronations, but St Paul’s has also seen its fair share. In 1897 Queen Victoria commemorated her diamond jubilee here, and Queen Elizabeth II has also celebrated her jubilees in the cathedral. Royal weddings have been held here as well, most famously (in recent years) that of Prince Charles to Lady Diana Spencer in 1981. State funerals that have been held here include those of Admiral Lord Nelson, the Duke of Wellington and of the wartime Prime Minister, Sir Winston Churchill. I remember the latter well although I was only a child at the time – it was a very grand and rather sombre affair captured in detail on TV. There are monuments here to Nelson and Wellington, and also (among others) to Captain Scott who died in 1912 after his failed attempt to be first to the South Pole.

    The scale of the building is awe-inspiring, especially as you stand beneath the dome and look upwards. But don’t just look up – you can ascend the dome and it is well worth doing. You will need some stamina however, especially if you want to go all the way to the top. I have done so on a few occasions and the views, as well as the sense of being somewhere rather special, do justify the effort. But your first goal is the Whispering Gallery, 259 steps up from the cathedral floor. Here you can test the phenomenon that gives the gallery its name – even softly spoken words carry from one side to the other due to some sort of acoustical effect. From here 119 steps take you to the Stone Gallery, which encircles the base of the dome on its exterior. Already you can see the views opening up, but press on up the remaining 200 steps to the Golden Gallery, and you will be at the highest point of the dome, with views of the River Thames, Tate Modern and Shakespeare's Globe Theatre among other landmarks.

    Back at ground level, do have a look at some of the works of art in the cathedral. Two of the most impressive are the painting by the Pre-Raphaelite artist Holman Hunt, The Light of the World in the North Transept, and Henry Moore’s wonderfully fluid sculpture. Mother and Child in the North Quire Aisle.

    You can also visit the Crypt, where you will see the tombs of the famous, including Nelson, Wellington, Wren himself and many more.

    The cathedral is open for sightseeing from Monday to Saturday from 8.30 am to 4.00 pm. The adult admission price of £16.50 (spring 2014 prices) includes all areas, while children (6-16) pay £7.50 and students and seniors £14.50. There are also family tickets available – check the website for details. On Sunday the cathedral is open for worship only and there is officially no sightseeing, but of course if you attend a service (see times here) you will get the chance to see inside (for free!), although not to climb to the galleries.

    From the Millennium Bridge From near the Globe At night
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    St Paul's Cathedral

    by RavensWing Written Oct 29, 2013

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    When most people think of St. Paul's Cathedral in London the image of Christopher Wren's magnificent classical church rises in their minds, but there was a cathedral dedicated to St. Paul long before the able Mr. Wren put his stamp on the skyline of Stuart London.

    This is where Prince Charles and Lady Diana Spencer were married. Their marriage was widely billed as a "fairytale wedding" and the "wedding of the century.

    You can't take pictures inside the cathedral, only outside but there is a gift shop where you can purchase books, pictures and other souvenirs

    The cathedral is open to the public at a charge for non-worshiping visitors and you can climb the 530 steps to the golden gallery where you can see a beautiful view of London. You can walk to the Stone Gallery - 378 steps from the ground level (at 173 feet), encircles the outside of the dome. Or the Whispering Gallery - 259 steps up. This runs around the interior.

    The cathedral also has a crypt. The cathedral has a crypt holding over 200 memorials. Crypts of Duke of Wellington, Nelson, and Christopher Wren can be found here. Nelson lies directly beneath the Dome's middle. The dome weighs 65,000 tonnes, supported by 8 pillars. The Cathedral is built in the shape of a cross, with the dome crowning the intersection of the arms.

    Open 8:30-4:00 for sightseeing.

    Admission Charges from 30 March 2013. (Prices in UK pounds sterling)*

    Individual Group (10+) and online Rates
    Adults (18+yrs) £16.00* £14.50
    Concessions (Students & Seniors) £14.00* £13.00
    Children (6-17yrs) £7.00* £6.00
    Family Ticket
    (2 Adults + 2 Children)
    Children (6-17yrs) £39.00* £35.00 (available online only)

    St Paul's Cathedral St Paul's Cathedral St Paul's Cathedral
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    St Paul's Cathedral

    by antistar Written Jul 2, 2013

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    The clergy didn't like Wren's designs for a new cathedral. They felt it broke too far from the mould of traditional Anglican churches. Wren built it anyway, using the generous leeway given him to build a church like no other in the country, with a dome considered by many to be a paragon of its kind - a cupola unmatched in the world. The controversy lingered even after consecration, with some commenting that the cathedral was pure popery - more Catholic than Church of England.

    It's true. St Paul's is the most un-English of English churches. It takes its inspiration from ecclesiastical masterpieces like St. Peter's Basilica in Rome. But despite the inspiration it's decidedly British. It's not just grand, it's sturdy - like a guardian lion or a hunched bulldog on the soft London clay. It is clean, whitewashed elegance, not encrusted with golden filigree. Its intention is to impress, and yet at the same time is thoroughly practical - a wonder of architectural science and engineering.

    It's not an English church, and yet it is unmistakably London. One look at the columned dome and you can't be anywhere else. It's iconic status is cemented by an indomitable history, born of the ashes of the Great Fire of London. Its image, stoic and unshaken amid the firebombs and smoking wreckage of the Blitz, was an inspiration to all, especially those sleeping nightly under the raining bombs in East London. It may have been inspired by the churches of Italy and France, but it is thoroughly British. It is London.

    St Paul's Cathedral, London St Paul's Cathedral, London St Paul's Cathedral, London St Paul's Cathedral, London St Paul's Cathedral, London

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    St Paul’s Cathedral

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jun 22, 2013

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    St Paul’s Cathedral is one of the most famous and most recognizable sights of London, with its dome, framed by the spires of Wren's City churches, dominating the skyline for 300 years. At 111 m high, it was the tallest building in London from 1710 to 1962, and its dome is also among the highest in the world.

    You can watch my 1 min 01 sec Video Tower Bridge and St Paul Cathedral out of my Youtube channel or here on VT.

    Sightseeing Times and Prices:
    St Paul's Cathedral is open for sightseeing from Monday to Saturday between 8.30am - 4pm.
    On Sunday the cathedral is open for worship only and there is no sightseeing.
    The price of admission includes entry to the cathedral floor, crypt and the three galleries in the dome (Whispering, Stone and Golden).
    Adults (18+yrs) £16.00
    Concessions (Students & Seniors) £14.00
    Children (6-17yrs) £7.00

    St Pauls Cathedral St Pauls Cathedral
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    Glory to Baroque

    by mikey_e Written Dec 13, 2012

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    St. Paul’s Cathedral is a massive structure that dominates at least part of the City of London, or at least would if it weren’t for the power of the City’s corporations to dominate the skyline instead. A church has stood on this spot since the beginning of the 7th century. The current building, however, dates to the 17th century, and is a product of Sir Christopher Wren, one of England’s most famous architects. The project to build the cathedral benefitted greatly from the calamity of the 1666 fire that destroyed massive sections of the city of London, as it gave Wren the opportunity to use plans for a cathedral that he had drawn up independently. Despite the architect’s forethought, the design of the cathedral was changed no less than five times, responding and incorporating the criticisms and suggestions of the aristocracy, royalty and the clergy. The fifth design was what won out, and it eschewed the Gothic influences that had previously been proposed. It stuck to the elongated Greek cross of the third plan, and was influenced by St. Peter’s Basilica in the Vatican. The resultant style is known as English Baroque, and indeed one can see the similarities between the western façade of the building with churches in Portugal and Spain that were built in the same time period. One of the most characteristic aspects of the church is its dome, which was initially supposed to be the crowning piece of the cathedral, but was later (during construction) altered to include a conical structure that is taller than the two towers on the western side of the building. The final design was polemical in some circles, but it has proven to be time honoured and well-loved by Londoners, especially following its survival of the blitzkrieg that destroyed much of the city during the Second World War. The stately columns and measured, rational and linear divisions of the various façades continue to make St. Paul’s one of the favourite destinations for locals and tourists alike.

    The Western fa��ade St. Paul's dome Another view of the dome The northwestern clock tower St. Paul's up close
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    QUEEN ANNE (the second)

    by davidjo Written Dec 7, 2012

    The statue at the of Queen Anne at the Western entrance to St. Paul's is the second statue as the original from 1712 suffered from the London weather, and was replaced in 1885. Queen Anne was alive during the building of St. Paul's and she claimed England, Ireland, France and North America which are represented by the four figures at the base of the statue, between them the Royal Coat of Arms, the Fleur-di-lis, the Irish Harp and the English Lions.

    QUEEN ANNE Cathedral Entrance
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    ST. PAUL'S CROSS

    by davidjo Written Dec 7, 2012

    St. Paul's Cross, erected in 1920 can be seen in the grounds of St. Paul's. Sermons used to be preached by st. Paul's Cross from the 13th century but throughout the centuries much controversy surrounded the Cross causing riots so Elizabeth I kept the pulpit empty for months to see which religion England would adopt. St. Paul's Cross was swept away by a wave of Puritanism which destroyed much of English treasures and architecture.

    1910 CROSS
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    NATIONAL FIREFIGHTERS MEMORIAL

    by davidjo Written Dec 7, 2012

    South of St.Paul's on the Jubilee walkway you will find a memorial to the brave fighters that helped extinguish fire during the WWII blitz. The memorial was erected in 1991 with funds from the Memorial Trust and a plaque commemorates the heroes.

    FIREFIGHTERS DURING THE BLITZ THE PLAQUE
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    HIGHEST POINT IN CITY OF LONDON

    by davidjo Written Dec 7, 2012

    St. Paul's Cathedral is found on the top of Ludgate Hill, the highest point in the City of London, and was built in the 17th century although there had been churches on this site since 604 AD. The dome is the highest in Britain and it was also the highest building in London until 1962. Funerals, weddings, birthdays and jubilees have been celebrated here. The cathedral is open for sightseeing tours from 8.30 am to 4 pm with an admission charge of £12.50. Don't forget to visit the crypt to see tombs and memorials of some of the countries greatest people. Try the acoustics in the Whispering Galley and climb up to the golden Gallery for astounding views of London.

    the entrance
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    St Paul’s Cathedral – A lot of stairs.

    by Jerelis Written Oct 8, 2012

    Like I said before, the cathedral was partly destroyed during the Great Fire in 1666, and it also had quite a hard time during the second World War. It was targeted during the Blitz and struck by bombs twice. On 12 September 1940 a time-delayed bomb that had struck the cathedral was successfully defused and removed by a bomb disposal detachment of Royal. All this information just made me realize how pleased we all must be that we are still able to visit this amazing building up till today.

    St. Paul's Cathedral is a true architectural masterpiece. We just couldn’t stop admiring this amazing old building. But just remember one important thing: there are stairs, stairs and even more stairs! We went as far as the whispering gallery, because we lacked the time to explore some more. We saw some people who went up and up again. Their advice was definitely to bring a camera further up. There is a possibility to go outside and you can take beautiful photos. But the people who went up also remembered us that there are stairs, stairs and even more stairs!

    The last picture I took :)
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