St. Pauls Cathedral, London

4.5 out of 5 stars 267 Reviews

St Pauls Churchyard, EC4 0 20 7236 4128

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    St Paul's Cathedral, London
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    St Paul's Cathedral
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    St Paul's Cathedral
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  • Jerelis's Profile Photo

    St Paul’s Cathedral – A lot of stairs.

    by Jerelis Written Oct 8, 2012

    Like I said before, the cathedral was partly destroyed during the Great Fire in 1666, and it also had quite a hard time during the second World War. It was targeted during the Blitz and struck by bombs twice. On 12 September 1940 a time-delayed bomb that had struck the cathedral was successfully defused and removed by a bomb disposal detachment of Royal. All this information just made me realize how pleased we all must be that we are still able to visit this amazing building up till today.

    St. Paul's Cathedral is a true architectural masterpiece. We just couldn’t stop admiring this amazing old building. But just remember one important thing: there are stairs, stairs and even more stairs! We went as far as the whispering gallery, because we lacked the time to explore some more. We saw some people who went up and up again. Their advice was definitely to bring a camera further up. There is a possibility to go outside and you can take beautiful photos. But the people who went up also remembered us that there are stairs, stairs and even more stairs!

    The last picture I took :)
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    St Paul’s Cathedral – Rude staff!

    by Jerelis Written Oct 8, 2012

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    What I do remember of my visit in 1989 is that the St Paul’s Cathedral is definitely iconic for London and it is truly grand! One huge disadvantage was that they had the rudest staff of any cathedral I've ever been to. I've been to three or four staff members to ask something, but they had the high almighty attitude towards me and other visitors. Shame on them!

    But anyway the St Paul’s Cathedral is a breathtaking cathedral and nobody visiting London should miss it, is my opinion. The baroque interior is just as gorgeous as its exterior, and it's one of the few famous churches in the world where I actually felt like I was in a church when visiting it, and not in a museum. We saw that several famous people were entombed in the cathedral's crypt. Most notable are the tomb of the Duke of Wellington - who defeated Napoleon at Waterloo - and the tomb of Admiral Nelson, who died at the Battle of Trafalgar. There is also a tomb of Christopher Wren himself and a number of important artists are buried here as well. Don’t forget to visit the lovely cafe located in the crypt area with nice facilities.

    Another view at the cathedral. The famous front facade of St Paul's Cathedral.
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  • Jerelis's Profile Photo

    St Paul’s Cathedral – Founded in AD604?!

    by Jerelis Written Oct 8, 2012

    Once again I had to dig into my memory before I was able to write down this tip on Virtual Tourist. My visit dates back to 1989 when I was in town with my school class. As you can see by the pictures I wasn’t really into watching monuments and taking beautiful pictures of them. I was glad that our teacher took us along to this amazing cathedral. He told us that the St Paul’s Cathedral is a Church of England cathedral and the seat of the Bishop of London. Its dedicated to Paul the Apostle and this does date back to the original church on this site, founded in AD 604.

    We first visited the Westminster Abbey and what I do remember is that the Abbey overshadowed St Paul’s Cathedral, but still it is a very spectacular destination. It is quite a contrast if you know that 1666, when the Great Fire of London destroyed 4/5th of all of London, the St. Paul's Cathedral was whipped off the map. It just made us wonder what a nice masterpiece stands here now and making us even more glad we visited the cathedral.

    The facade of St Paul's Cathedral. View at the dome of St Paul's Cathedral.
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  • alyf1961's Profile Photo

    ST PAUL'S CATHEDRAL

    by alyf1961 Written Mar 12, 2012

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    The first cathedral stood on this site around 604 AD.
    St Paul’s was the first Cathedral to be built after the reformation in the 16th century, when Henry VIII broke the Church of England from being under the rules of the Pope in Rome.
    The present cathedral was built between 1665 and 1710 after the previous church was destroyed during the great fire of London in 1666. Sir Christopher Wren built the Cathedral and 51 other churches in the city after the great fire.
    St Paul’s is a favourite of the Royal family with Queen Victoria commemorating her diamond jubilee here. Our present Queen Elizabeth II celebrated her Jubille here as well as her 80th birthday in 2006.
    Catherine of Aragon married Prince Arthur here as well as the well televised wedding of Prince Charles and Lady Diana Spencer in 1981.
    Important funerals have also taken place here including Admiral Lord Nelson, The Duke of Wellington and Winston Churchill.
    Admission to the Cathedral includes entry to the cathedral floor, the crypt, the three galleries in the dome (Whispering, Stone and Golden. Admission also includes multi media guides and guided tours.
    OPENING TIMES
    Monday to Saturday 8.30 am – 4 pm.
    Last entry is 4pm.
    PRICES
    ADULTS £14.50
    STUDENTS AND SENIORS £13.50
    CHILDREN (6-18) £5.50
    FAMILY TICKET (2 ADULTS + 2 CHILDREN) £34.5

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  • didier06's Profile Photo

    Visit ST PAUL'S CATHEDRAL

    by didier06 Written Jan 23, 2012

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    The cathedral sits at the top of Ludgate hill.The present church dates from the late 17th century and is the masterpiece of the famous English architect Sir Christopher WREN.

    The inner dome holds three circular galleries, the internal "Whispering gallery" and the external
    "Stone gallery" and "Golden gallerie".

    The "Golden gallerie" offers great views of London.

    ST PAUL CATHEDRAL The city The Thames The south west tower
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  • spidermiss's Profile Photo

    St Paul's Cathedral

    by spidermiss Updated Jun 26, 2011

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    This cathedral was rebuilt after The Great Fire of London in 1666 and designed by Sir Christopher Wren in the early 1700s. This is one of my favourite cathedrals I ever visited and in 2009 I was glad of the opportunity to explore inside including the nave, the dome, the quire and the crypt where many important people are either buried of remembered including Sir Christopher Wren, Lord Nelson, Duke of Wellington, Florence Nightingale and the painter, JMW Turner.

    You pay extra to the visit The Galleries. You begin your ascent, 257 steps up, to The Whispering Gallery where whispers can be heard away at the opposite site of the dome. Another 119 steps up is the Stone Gallery outside where you can get amazing views of the London skyline including the Millenium Bridge, Tate Modern, Canary Wharf, The Monument and Tower Bridge. The final flight of stairs, totalling 528 steps from the cathedral floors, you reach the Golden Gallery for more panoramic views but higher up.

    There is a cathedral shop and refreshments.

    I thoroughly enjoyed exploring the cathedral and this is one of a very few attractions that I can return to.

    It cost me 11 GBP (January 2010) to explore the Cathedral including The Galleries.

    St Paul's Cathedral Millennium Bridge with St Paul's in the background From the Stone Gallery, St Paul's Cathedral Views from St Paul's Cathedral Stone Gallery. St Paul's Cathedral
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  • Donna_in_India's Profile Photo

    Climb to the Whispering Gallery

    by Donna_in_India Updated Jun 3, 2011

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    St. Paul's Cathedral is located in "The City", London's financial quarter. It was built by Sir Christopher Wren and although he built more than 50 churches, this is his masterpiece. It is built in the shape of the cross and has one of the largest cathedral domes in the world.

    It is a really beautiful (and huge) church with several small altars on either side. Beautiful mosaics and stone carvings adorn the inside. I loved the center altar. It was seen around the world during the marriage of Prince Charles and Princess Diana.

    We climbed the 259 steps up to the whispering gallery. The whispering gallery is up in the first dome of the church. You are supposed to be able to sit on one side and whisper to someone on the other side – 107 feet away. We tried and tried but weren’t able to hear each other at all but had fun trying.

    Filming and photography is not allowed inside the Cathedral.

    Tickets available online to avoid queues.

    Hours:

    St Paul's Cathedral is open for sightseeing from Monday to Saturday between 8.30am - 4pm.
    Last tickets are sold at 4pm and the cathedral closes for sightseeing at 4.30pm.
    On Sunday the cathedral is open for worship only and there is no sightseeing.
    The galleries are open to sightseers from Monday to Saturday between 9.30am - 4.15pm (last admission). Please note that children must be accompanied by an adult when visiting the galleries.

    Admission: Adults £14.50, Seniors £13.50, Students £13.50, Children (6-18yrs) £5.50

    Both guided and audio tours are available.

    Please note that all visitor information is correct as of this update.

    Inside St. Paul's Cathedral St. Paul's Cathedral Whispering Gallery - St. Paul's Cathedral
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  • scottishvisitor's Profile Photo

    Don't feed the birds!

    by scottishvisitor Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    A song always springs to mind when you see this magnificent Church "Feed the birds" from Mary Poppins. We wandered around the grounds first & were surprised to see roses still blooming in the little garden, when we saw a sign saying "Do not feed the birds" my friend remarked that Mary Poppins was illiterate! Then came the serious stuff of really looking at this place of worship. A Sir Christopher Wren masterpiece & where he was laid to rest. I have heard there is a charge for a tour here, but if you join in the service on a Sunday - it's free - take a seat - sit quietly & marvel at the magic of the interior - please observe the no photography signs & show some respect. We saw one tourist being told of for using a camera - it doesn't matter what nationality you are the signs are in pictures.
    Check out the web site if you would like to see St. Paul's interior.

    St. Paul's Cathedral having a facelift Looking up up up Beautiful stone work A timely piece of architecture Mary Poppins & friend on the steps of St. Paul's
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  • acemj's Profile Photo

    St. Paul's Cathedral

    by acemj Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    St. Paul's Cathedral
    This place is huge! The central dome is impressive and looms over the city as perhaps the most noticeable aspect of its skyline. Go inside and gaze at the interior, but you won't be permitted to take photos inside. This is a postcard that I got in the gift shop.

    St. Paul is the city's patron saint and the cathedral is the masterpiece by the famous architect, Christopher Wren, who is buried in the crypt below.

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  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    St Pauls Cathedral, The Whispering Gallery

    by kris-t Updated Mar 8, 2011

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    The Whispering Gallery runs around the interior of the Dome and is 259 steps up from ground-level. It gets its name from a charming quirk in its construction, which makes a whisper against its walls audible on the opposite side.

    Designed by Christopher Wren, and completed in 1711, to replace previous building destroyed in the great fire of 1666. Climb the dome, - the stairs take you through the whispering gallery, and on up to the lantern for a fine view.

    entrance ticket - BP12.50

    St Pauls Cathedral, London St Pauls Cathedral, London St Pauls Cathedral, London St Pauls Cathedral, London St Pauls Cathedral, London
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  • smirnofforiginal's Profile Photo

    St. Paul's

    by smirnofforiginal Updated Feb 7, 2011

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    Built between 1675 and 1710 this beautiful building (the fourth cathderal to stand on this spot) was designed by Sir Christopher Wren.
    Famous ceremonies have been held here including, of course, the wedding of the Prince of Wales to Lady Diana.

    I visited St. Paul's as a young child (as all school children used to) and my memory of it is dominated by The Whispering Gallery. If you stand on one side and whisper to the wall, the person on the other side of the gallery can hear you!

    The golden ball that sit on top of the dome is actually a room! 10 people can fit into it.

    Adult : £14.50. Child (6-18 years) £5.50 or family (2 adults, 2 children) £34.50
    8.30am - 4.30pm
    on Sundays the cathedral is a place of worship and therefore no sight seeing is possible.

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  • malianrob's Profile Photo

    St Paul Cathedral

    by malianrob Updated Jan 17, 2011

    Built between 1675 and 1710, this is where Prince Charles and Lady Diana were married. It is truly a beautiful place. We took a guided tour and learned so much of the history here. We couldnt take pictures inside the cathedral only outside which really sucks but there is a gift shop where you can purchase books, pictures and other souveniers.
    St Pauls Cathedral is located in the main financial center and this was considered the original London. I thought it was a Catholic church but its actually Anglican. The cathedral is open to the public at a charge for non-worshipping visitors and you can climb the 530 steps to the golden gallery where you can see a beautiful view of London. I didnt do this because we didnt have time. We did see a wedding here though and we also went down to the crypt. The cathedral has a crypt holding over 200 memorials.
    One of the largest domes in the world 111.3 meters high, weighing 65,000 tons it is supported by eight pillars. The dome is actually a dome within a dome and this is what we see on the outside of the cathedral. Around the Dome there are three Galleries, the Whispering Gallery, The Stone Gallery, and the Golden Gallery, this is the highest point of the outer Dome. This place is impressive and a must see when in London.

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  • WheninRome's Profile Photo

    St. Paul's Cathedral

    by WheninRome Updated Nov 26, 2010

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    It is definitely worth paying the entrance fee for full admission to St. Paul's Cathedral even at 12.50 gbp per person. Opening times are from 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM. Be sure to give yourself at least an hour to fully enjoy it - I spent almost 2 hours exploring the church and enjoying the heavenly views from the dome.

    Start out by enjoying the main church interior. The Nave and North and South Transepts are all very beautiful and worthy of a look. We took a seat on the ground floor under the dome and very quite a while just took everything in. The paintings, architecture, stained glass, everything is beautiful and awe-inspiring.

    Once you have taken the main floor in, either make your way up or down. First we went down to take a short tour of the crypt area, where notables like Christopher Wren (the church designer) and the Duke of Wellington rest.

    Next we made our way up the winding staircase to the Whispering Gallery. This is definitely a treat as the acoustics let you whisper along the wall and be heard by your partner (or an eavesdropper) a long way away. I then made my way up another set of staircases, I believe to the Golden Gallery, which is the highest you are allowed to get. The views from the outside balcony are stunning - worth both the climb and the price of admission.

    St. Paul's Cathedral was one of my highlights of London.

    View of London from outside of the Dome Looking up at the Dome Looking down the Nave Dome from the Outside Looking Down from the Whispering Gallery
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  • leffe3's Profile Photo

    St Pauls - and that Bridge

    by leffe3 Updated Nov 25, 2010

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    Millenium Bridge opened and closed within a few days of each other as the designed 'sway' made people decidedly sea-sick. People were left hanging for dear life as in the movies - you know the story - in the attempt to escape the arch-villains in the jungles and rainforests, our hero and heroine are forced to take their lives in their hands and cross the rickety old wooden bridge that traverses the deep ravine. OK - poetic license :), but the bridge was closed within a couple of days of the celebratory opening.

    A year or more of rectifying - and now this wonderfully designed bridge crosses the Thames. You can now walk from St Paul's to the Tate Modern in minutes (and a few hundered meters from the Tate is the house where Christopher Wren himself lived, watching the construction of his mighty cathedral).

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  • leffe3's Profile Photo

    St Paul's

    by leffe3 Updated Nov 25, 2010

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    One of London's masterpieces - Sir Christopher's Wren's St Paul's was built between 1675 and 1710. It is the fourth cathedral on the site since 604 AD - Wren's Baroque splendour built as a result of its predecessor being destroyed in The Great Fire of London (1666). Interestingly, the final building was Wren's third attempt at deisgning what was preceived to be London's premier place of Worship.

    Surprisingly, it is sparingly used for significant events - Westminster Cathedral gains that honour, with every Coronation and most burials of senior royalty. But funerals of Nelson (1806), Wellington (1852), Churchill (1965), weddings of Prince Charles & Lady Di (1981) as well as services to celebrate significant moments have taken place at St Paul's.

    Not everything is as Wren designed it - although the changes are mostly on the interior. Thus whislt the stunning facade, dome, Whispering Gallery and extraordinary nave with stonework, mosaics and carving that take your breath away are original, the mosaic floor was added in the late 19th century and the behest of Queen Victoria, the American Memorial Chapel rebuilt after WWII and named by a grateful nation to the American allies.

    Photography is no longer allowed inside the cathedral – these photos were taken several years ago when it was allowed (and hence the poor quality).

    Opening times: Monday-Saturday, 8.30am-4pm
    Admission prices: £12.50/ £11.50 (seniors)/ £9.50 (students)/ £4.50 (kids)/ £29.50 (family)

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