Tate Modern, London

4 out of 5 stars 4 Stars - 146 Reviews

25 Sumner Street London SE1 +00 44 (0)20 7887 8000

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  • The Turbine Hall
    The Turbine Hall
    by toonsarah
  • View from the Tate Modern, London
    View from the Tate Modern, London
    by antistar
  • Max Ernst, Tate Modern, London
    Max Ernst, Tate Modern, London
    by antistar
  • MM212's Profile Photo

    The Tate Modern

    by MM212 Updated Nov 25, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Interior perspective - Jan 07
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    London's national museum of modern art, The Tate Modern, is housed in an old power station on the South Bank. It contains a permanent collection of impressive modern art, as well as frequent intriguing temporary exhibitions. The building itself was built in 1947 as a power station after the design by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, but when the power station shut down in 1981, it remained vacant. In 2000, the renowned Swiss architectural firm, Herzog & de Meuron, was assigned the project of transforming the building into a modern art museum. Its arrival in a neglected part of London on the opposite bank of the Thames completely revitalised the area and the rehabilitation of the building was deemed most successful as the museum became one of London's most visited.

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  • VZ-Pam's Profile Photo

    Tate Modern, the one with chimneys

    by VZ-Pam Updated Nov 7, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The outside of Tate Modern is not modern at all.

    It is a former power station but when you stepped inside, you will see glassdoor and modern exhibitions .

    A section that I saw was sponsored by the New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg and there are computers there for visitors to learn stuff.

    A gem by itself in the South Bank of London.

    Very easy to find Tate Modern, right outside you will find the ultra modern sleek designed Millennium Bridge lead you the way to the St Paul's Cathedral on the opposite bank.

    The Old iconic building is like it is linked up to the industrial era kind of building, and eventually when you get inside will transition to a modern era.

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  • draguza's Profile Photo

    Tate Modern

    by draguza Written Aug 26, 2009

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    Inside Tate...

    Tate Modern is the national gallery of International modern and contemporary art and showcases art from 1900 to the present day. You can see here icons works from the famous Tate Collection, as well as a number of new displays. Admission to the museum is free.

    In Tate Modern museum you will be able, among others, to see the following collections: Francis Bacon, Viennese Actionism, Expressionism, Contemporary Painting, Claude Monet and Absract Expressionism, Giorgio de Chirico, Surrealism, Pablo Picasso, Realism, Futirism...

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  • breughel's Profile Photo

    From Tate Britain to Tate Modern.

    by breughel Updated Aug 12, 2009

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    Modern Tate.
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    I started with the TATE BRITAIN museum, which exists since 1897 under the name of Tate Gallery and displays in 35 rooms a complete collection of British art from 1500 to 2009, with painters as important for the UK as Gainsborough, Hogarth, Sargent, Constable, Whistler and Turner.
    The amateur of paintings will find here a display in a chronologic way of the British school through the centuries. I especially liked a number of works from Sargent, Whistler and Millais. Unfortunately, I can show no photos, because photography is prohibited in this museum.

    Tate Britain has the largest collection of works by William Turner in the world. A large part of the museum (10 rooms) shows works from this painter whose style varied very much through his career.
    It was my second visit to this museum and it confirmed my impression that the British school was well behind the Italian, Dutch, Flemish or French painters.
    Furthermore some highlights of this school, like famous paintings by John Constable or William Turner, are at the National Gallery and not at Tate.

    The museum is located at Milbank Pier along the river Thames. During gallery hours a "Tate Boat" joins Tate Britain and Tate Modern every 40 minutes for a fee of 5£.
    I was too late for the last boat to the Tate Modern. I don't know if I have to add unfortunately of fortunately when I read here the VT comments.
    For the time being I'll keep my comment to a cautious: "De gustibus et coloribus non est disputandum".

    Open: daily 10.00 - 17.50 (last admission 17.00 h)
    Free.

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  • jo104's Profile Photo

    Modern Art

    by jo104 Updated Jul 23, 2009

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    I often come to the Tate Modern if I just want to relax,
    Most of the exhibitions here are free to view although they have specialised exhibitions which charge a small entrance fee.

    The Tate Modern was created in 2000 from a disused power station, my boss feels if they had sectioned off parts of the plant it may have made for interesting viewing.

    Some of the art is interactive. The turbine hall always has interesting displays & handy if you don't have time to go around the different floors you can just nip in.

    The art installations have included a giant sun on the turbine hall roof, a huge crack in the floor, a huge spider overlooking bunk beds and then the bodyspaceinmotion display that dissappeared before the treasure hunt vt'ers got an opportunity to interact with it.

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    I suppose it is all about taste.

    by planxty Updated Jul 22, 2009

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Tate Modern, London, UK.

    I have lived in london for over 20 years and until last week I had never visited the Tate Modern. This is predominantly because I just don't get modern art. A couple of rows of house bricks on the floor? Art? I know there are many arguments about what constitutes art, and in an effort to be open-minded I am reading a good book now called "But is it art?" by Cynthia Freeland.

    Anyway, a very dear friend of mine is an art student. I recently assisted her in an art installation she had prepared for her end of term project, and very interesting it was. She has been nagging me for ages to visit with her. I thought having someone who knows about art might assist my understanding. Alas, not the case. In fairness, I did enjoy the Andy Warhol and Jeff Koons exhibits. I also loved the Monet painting, although how a work by a man who died in 1926 can be called modern is a little beyond me.

    Unfortunately, however, about 90% of what I saw I thought was complete garbage (almost literally in some cases). For example, one "installation" by Paul McCarthy consists of a room with several projectors in the middle. These project various overlapping images on the bare walls. As this is not an adult website I will refrain from describing a lot of them as they were extremely sexually graphic, but one of them consisted of a man punching himself in the head with boxing gloves on and another was of him vomiting. What this says about art or the world or whatever is beyond me, except that Mr. McCarthy can make a lot of money from the Tate.

    In fairness, my friend even admitted that a lot of it was nonsense. I am told this is one of the most respected modern art galleries in the world, but it will be a while before I venture back there. Ah well, at least it is free and the staff are helpful. The building itself is also very impressive.

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  • PALLINA's Profile Photo

    no need to be introduced

    by PALLINA Updated Jul 17, 2009

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    Reachable through the Millenium Bridge, the Tate Modern is an outstandingly bright builing, has great permanent (and not) exibitions and huge spaces. It rapresents surely one of the best museum in Europe for contemporary arts, starting from the end of IXX° century. Absolutely unmissable. The entrance is free, but audioguide costs 3£.
    10-18 from Sunday to Thursday, untill 22 on Sat and Friday

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  • profuselycool's Profile Photo

    Avoid the Modern Art

    by profuselycool Written Jul 1, 2009

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    I did not like the Tate Modern Art Museum. Call it uncultured or whatever, but unless you enjoy looking at a canvas completely covered in blue (as in an all blue canvas) and considering it social commentary on 20th century Europe, avoid this museum.

    From the outside it looks like a military barracks (or the Jedi Academy in Star Wars movies.)

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  • Airpunk's Profile Photo

    Tate Modern

    by Airpunk Written May 12, 2009

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    Tate Modern exhibition hall
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    This Museum of Modern Art is among London’s finest museum with artworks from the latze 19th, 20th and 21st century and ocassional ones from long past times. The museum is located in a former power station (Bankside Power Station) which gives it a very cold, but interesting flair. It was moved from the Tate galleries to this location in 2000. All well-known 20th century artists as Dali, Picasso, Rothko, Mondriaan, Warhol, Calder and many more are represented by several pieces. The exhibition takes place on seven storeys and there are always a couple of temporary ones. It means, you’ll never get bored there – maybe just exhausted after too much art input. But if you can’t get enough, there are computers on some floors where you can learn a lot about art theory and the different styles you will encounter in the museum. And of course, a museum café and a souvenir shop are also available.
    Admission is free, only some of the special exhibtions require entry fees.

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  • alyf1961's Profile Photo

    TATE MODERN

    by alyf1961 Written Nov 28, 2008

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    TATE MODERN

    Tate modern stands on the banks of the river Thames. The building was a power station that was refurbished by Swiss architects Herzog and de Meuron.
    The building was built in the 1940’s and 50’s to Giles Gilbert Scott’s design.
    The new project retains the 325FT tower and the huge turbine hall.
    Although we spent pleasant hour here I really don’t get modern art.

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  • Gypsystravels's Profile Photo

    International, Modern and Contemporary Art!

    by Gypsystravels Updated Nov 12, 2008

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    The building
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    The Tate Modern is a national gallery housing international and national modern art from 1500 to the present day. The musuem was created in 2000 from an old and disused power station in the heart of London and now houses some of the most important modern art collections in the world.

    You can find excellent examples of modern art from some of the most famous indivuduals like Picasso, Dali, Warhol, Lichenstein just to name a few.

    NOTE: Entrance to the musuem is free and please also note that there is absolutely no phtotgraphy allowed inside the musuem.

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  • sourbugger's Profile Photo

    Sliding down the tubes.

    by sourbugger Updated Oct 13, 2008

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    Sourbugger rarely appreciates a piece of modern art, but one installation at the Tate Modern seemed to be somewhat different. I believe it is now sadly a footnote of artistic history :

    This what I wrote at the time : The museum, which already receives some 1.7 million visitors a year, is bound to be boosted by the appeareance of five giant slides in the hall of the Gallery. This vast space used to be a turbine hall back in the days when it was a power station : so it is always a challenge to find something to fill it.

    With mat-in-hand as you launch youself down a glorified sewer pip, remember that the artist claims that sliding is a 'mental workout for the mind'. Yeah, right. He also says that it could form part of an intergrated public transport system. What a load of absolute twaddle! but at least you can use the thing, and enjoy it. I suppose that you could use the Tate's other famous exhibit, Tracey Emin's Bed - and plenty of people have had pleasure out of that (nunge-nuge, wink-wink eh ?)

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  • uglyscot's Profile Photo

    Visit the Tate Modern

    by uglyscot Written Jun 13, 2008

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    Tate Modern
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    The Tate Modern was opened in May 2000 by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II
    It is the national gallery of international modern and contemporary art, from 1900 to nthe present. In June 2008 this included a free exhibition of street art featuring huge pictures on the outside walls.
    Admission to the displays is free, but donations are welcomed. Special exhibitions cost £10.

    Open Sunday- Thursday 10.00=18.00; Friday and Saturday from 10.00-22.00.
    Free guided tours are available. Wheelchairs, pushchairs are catered for, and it is fully accessible to those who are deaf and blind.
    Shops stock books on architecture, art and London , as well as other gifts for adults and children.
    There are cafes and restaurants on Level 2 and Level 7,
    A boat links Tate Modern with Tate Britain every 40 minutes from Bankside Pier.

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  • the best walk in London Great views

    by jayleedee Written Mar 17, 2008

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    Walk along the Thames (River) path. The best views of London by far. If you are interested in London’s History & Culture you can download a great audio guide from http://www.talkingtrip.com/ the guide will help you explore all the sites along the Thames walk and other fascinating parts of the city of London.

    Enjoy

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  • Marpessa's Profile Photo

    The Tate Modern Museum

    by Marpessa Updated Jan 19, 2008

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    The Tate Modern (2007)
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    I have now been to the Tate Modern Museum twice. The first time was in 2004 and I went specifically to see the Frida Kahlo exhibit and did not see any other party of the museum. For the special exibits like the Kahlo one, I felt that it was very well set out and presented, leaving plenty of room between the artworks, so that people didn't have to crowd around together. There was also plenty of information detailing about the paintings and the life of Kahlo.

    In 2007 I went again, but this time just viewed the main galleries. I wish I had been able to take some photos as there were some very good exhibits. Unfortunately as most of the exhibits will change it's hard to write a tip about the different rooms. However I will say that each section of the museum was very well set out, showing a mixture of paintings, sculptures, video artworks, drawings/sketches and much more. I liked the feel of the museum, it didn't feel overcrowded, there were plenty of spots to sit and look at artwork... or maybe just to rest :). There is also the option of paying for an audio guide as you wander around the museum.

    All main galleries are free, whereas special exhibits cost a fee to view them (to see Kahlo's work cost GBP 10). There are donation bins to help contribute to keeping the museum in its great condition.

    There is also a good gift shop to buy souvenir's from (although a bit over-priced like most gift shops).

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