Tate Modern, London

4 out of 5 stars 153 Reviews

25 Sumner Street London SE1 +00 44 (0)20 7887 8000

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  • The Turbine Hall
    The Turbine Hall
    by toonsarah
  • View from the Tate Modern, London
    View from the Tate Modern, London
    by antistar
  • Max Ernst, Tate Modern, London
    Max Ernst, Tate Modern, London
    by antistar
  • breughel's Profile Photo

    From Tate Britain to Tate Modern.

    by breughel Updated Aug 12, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I started with the TATE BRITAIN museum, which exists since 1897 under the name of Tate Gallery and displays in 35 rooms a complete collection of British art from 1500 to 2009, with painters as important for the UK as Gainsborough, Hogarth, Sargent, Constable, Whistler and Turner.
    The amateur of paintings will find here a display in a chronologic way of the British school through the centuries. I especially liked a number of works from Sargent, Whistler and Millais. Unfortunately, I can show no photos, because photography is prohibited in this museum.

    Tate Britain has the largest collection of works by William Turner in the world. A large part of the museum (10 rooms) shows works from this painter whose style varied very much through his career.
    It was my second visit to this museum and it confirmed my impression that the British school was well behind the Italian, Dutch, Flemish or French painters.
    Furthermore some highlights of this school, like famous paintings by John Constable or William Turner, are at the National Gallery and not at Tate.

    The museum is located at Milbank Pier along the river Thames. During gallery hours a "Tate Boat" joins Tate Britain and Tate Modern every 40 minutes for a fee of 5£.
    I was too late for the last boat to the Tate Modern. I don't know if I have to add unfortunately of fortunately when I read here the VT comments.
    For the time being I'll keep my comment to a cautious: "De gustibus et coloribus non est disputandum".

    Open: daily 10.00 - 17.50 (last admission 17.00 h)
    Free.

    Modern Tate. Tate Britain, Millbank entrance.
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  • sue_stone's Profile Photo

    Tate Modern

    by sue_stone Written Aug 23, 2006

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    Love it or hate it, modern art certainly gets a reaction. To see what the fuss is all about head to the Tate Modern, Britain's national museum of international modern art. Opened in 2000, the gallery houses art from as far back as the 1500's, till the present day. Entry to the permanent collections and many of the temporary exhibitions is free.

    This impressive gallery is housed within the old Bankside Power Station, making the space itself as much of an attraction as the collections it contains. On display you can see work by such greats as Warhol, Picasso, Dalí & Matisse.

    We entered via the Turbine Hall, which used to house the electricity generators of the old power station. It is seven storeys tall and here you can see specially-commissioned work by up and coming artists. When we visited the Turbine Hall was filled with this huge red funnel-like masterpiece - not exactly sure what it was, but it sure was impressive!

    Suffering from art-overload? Why not relax for a while at the Tate Modern Restaurant, on the 7th floor of the building. It offers fine dining with spectacular views over London. Alternatively, there is a more relaxed café or an Espresso bar for that quick caffeine boost. We stopped by the 2nd floor café for a light lunch and a much needed coffee.

    Modern Art - can someone explain it to me please!?

    Tate Modern Art??! View from the 7th floor restaurant Turbine Hall More art darling!
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  • Regina1965's Profile Photo

    Tate Modern.

    by Regina1965 Updated Dec 30, 2012

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    Tate Modern is said to be the most popular modern art gallery in the world. I am not that into modern art, but I wanted to go there anyway, and didn´t regret it.

    Tate Modern is a very special gallery in a big former power station right on the banks of Thames. It mainly exhibits modern and contemporary art, some of which I don´t understand at all. And I so want to understand it. But here are also paintings by the masters, Monet f.ex. And surrealistic work by Dalí, Ernst and Miró. Here is also a Picasso collection and works by Mondrian, Giacometti, Pollock, Bourgeois, Rothko, Moore and Matisse. So it is well worth a visit.

    Tate Modern is on 6 floors - and it is so spacious. There are exhibitions on 3 floors and they are so extensive and different from one another that I think everybody will find something there that they will like. I just rattled my brain over some of the modern art work and thought that the artist was maby taking us for a ride. But that is just my opinion, nobody forced me to go to Tate Modern, there are plenty of other traditional galleries if one is not into modern art. There was one art work though that made me think. In one showroom there was a big thingy (in lack of a better word) lit up, I would say 2 big lights, one on a table and one coming from above slowly approaching the light on the table. When they touched the light went out. The artist is showing the act of taking a photo and I kind of agree with him here. One can be so occupied with taking a photo that one doesn´t really enjoy what one is looking at. I have felt like this when I am traveling, instead of really absorbing the beauty of a place the first thing I do is take a photo.

    This is what I love about art, when it makes you wake up and think. But most of the modern art work there didn´t do the trick, maybe some other time I will be more inclined to understanding this kind of art. There are free daily guided tours at 11:00, 12:00, 14:00, 15:00 and I am going to go on those tours next time I visit Tate Modern. Maybe that will make me appreciate this kind of art form more, or at least understand it.

    There is a café there with fantastic views of London and the Milennium bridge. And Tate Modern is so lively, I would go there just to be around people and have some coffee and wander around in the show-rooms. Here are also interactive activities and films so there is plenty to do here and a visit will take ca 2-3 hours.

    Photos are allowed without flash.

    Admission: free. Some exhibitions are not free of charge though.

    Opening hours: Sunday-Thursday: 10:00-18:00. Friday and Saturday: 10:00-22:00.

    There is a boat, the Tate boat, which takes people from Tate Modern to Take Britain. But I wouldn´t recommend visiting both galleries in one day, my mission was to visit 2 galleries/museums every day... it just proved to be too much. One cannot take it all in, especially in such big museums/galleries.

    Salouda Raouda Choucair. Tate Modern as seen from the Millennium bridge. Monet - Water-lilies. Picasso - Bowl of fruit, violin and bottle. Modern art...

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  • toonsarah's Profile Photo

    Art in an old power station

    by toonsarah Updated Apr 14, 2014

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Update April 2014: additional photo added

    The newer of the two Tate Galleries in London is Tate Modern, which is housed in a converted power station on Bankside. It displays the national collection of international modern art, which is defined as art dating from 1900 onwards. Tate Modern includes modern British art where it contributes to the story of modern art, so major modern British artists may be found at both Tate Modern and Tate Britain.

    Highlights of the collection include masterpieces by both Picasso and Matisse and one of the world's finest collections of Surrealism, including works by Dalí, Ernst, Magritte and Mirò. Among my personal favourites are the sculptures of Giacometti and a whole room devoted to Mark Rothko. The collection is arranged not chronologically as you might expect, but by four major themes: Material Gestures, Poetry & Dream, Idea & Object and States of Flux. This makes it possible to compare very different artists tackling similar themes.

    There are also regular special exhibitions, often making use of the vast space of the old turbine hall which sits at the heart of the gallery. Check the website to see what is on when you're in London. Facilities include a formal restaurant (on the top floor and apparently with stunning views of the river – I haven’t eaten there myself) and two cafes. General admission is free although there is a charge for special exhibitions.

    The gallery is open Sunday – Thursday, 10.00 AM – 6.00 PM, and on Friday and Saturday, 10.00 AM – 10.00 PM. Be prepared for crowds if you come at the weekend in particular – this gallery has certainly made modern art more popular and more accessible, and it’s a favourite destination for many London families as well as tourists.

    The Turbine Hall Exhibit in Tate Modern Outside Tate Modern
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  • Tate Modern

    by Mariajoy Updated Jan 14, 2007

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    Built from the old Bank Side Power Station, The Tate Modern is a must see activity for any visitor to London. I love the way London constantly rebuilds, changes and makes new from old - it never sits still, stagnating... it did that for a while - and found it wasn't healthy.

    As with all the best museums and galleries in London - it's free - except for the special exhibitions. Donations of course are always gladly accepted - and it's a fantastic place to see the works of Mondrian, Dali, Pollock, Degas,Rothko, etc etc - so give what you can.

    Its open Sun-Thurs 10.00-18.00 and Fri-Sat 10.00-22.00.

    Tate Mod Bronze Spider Frida Kahlo Exhibition Modern Window Head to Head in the Turbine Hal

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  • jo104's Profile Photo

    Modern Art

    by jo104 Updated Jul 23, 2009

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    I often come to the Tate Modern if I just want to relax,
    Most of the exhibitions here are free to view although they have specialised exhibitions which charge a small entrance fee.

    The Tate Modern was created in 2000 from a disused power station, my boss feels if they had sectioned off parts of the plant it may have made for interesting viewing.

    Some of the art is interactive. The turbine hall always has interesting displays & handy if you don't have time to go around the different floors you can just nip in.

    The art installations have included a giant sun on the turbine hall roof, a huge crack in the floor, a huge spider overlooking bunk beds and then the bodyspaceinmotion display that dissappeared before the treasure hunt vt'ers got an opportunity to interact with it.

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  • Tripack's Profile Photo

    Taste The Tate...

    by Tripack Written Jun 30, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness


    In 2000, Tate Modern opened to the public in the impressive transformed Bankside Power Station. Its location is beside the Thames River, the new Millenium pedestrian bridge linked the museum to St Paul’s Cathedral.

    Tate is a Modern art museum on 7 levels. It holds the Tate Collection of International 20th Century art, featuring major works by the most influential artists of this century including Bourgeois, Picasso, Matisse, Mondrian, Duchamp, Dali, Bacon, Giacometti, Pollock, Rothko and Warhol. It is also a Gallery for the 21st Century exhibiting new art as it is created and drawing in new audiences.

    On top floor (7th) you will find a nice bar and restaurant with great views on the Thames and the right bank skyline.

    Admission to the gallery is free, but donations are welcome. Some temporary exhibitions are subject to entrance fee.

    Gallery Hours:
    Sunday to Thursday, 10.00-18.00
    Friday and Saturday, 10.00-22.00
    Last admission into exhibitions 17.15 (Fri and Sat 21.15)

    Closed 24, 25, 26 December (open as normal on 1 January).

    Tate Modern view from the Thames View from the bar at the top floor
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  • tzuki's Profile Photo

    Modern Art at TATE !

    by tzuki Written May 8, 2004

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    The TATE Modern Britain's national museum of Modern Art.

    The building belong to the Bankside Power Station, along the River Thames.

    I do like the main entrance at the gallery , the Hall which is very open with has a high ceiling. At this entrance, sometimes, there are exhibitions going on as the one that I am showing in the picture [The Weather Project by Olafur Eliasson].

    Also, they do performances as dance in this entrance because the big set-ups they can build in it.

    Besides, this entrance, the gallery displays a huge diversity of international and contemporary art including artists such as Matisse, Rodin, Deacon, Brancusi, Mori, ....

    The buiding has also a coffee room and restaurant at the top floor, where is very nice to stay while observing the sunset over the River Thames.
    Besides, has another restaurant and bar at the ground floor, at the side with the main entrance.

    And a bookshop in the hall-entrance where is possible to find the catalogues of the exhibitions goin on and a large variety of titles and artist in the Modern Art field.

    The Weather Project at the Hall Entrance -- TATE!
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  • easyoar's Profile Photo

    The Tate Modern Art Gallery

    by easyoar Written Feb 11, 2005

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    One of the best ways of viewing the outside of the Tate Modern is from the Millennium Bridge (pedestrians only). It is very obvious to see that the building used to be a Power Station (as indeed it was). It still has its old smokestack.

    These days however, all of the old generating equipment has gone, to be replaced by lots and lots of some of the best 20th Century Art in the world. What's shown inside changes frequently, so it is hard to give details of what is currently there. See the attached website which should be able to give more details.

    The museum itself is open every day of the year except Dec 24th, 25th and 26th.

    The Tate Modern Art Gallery
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  • sylvie-uk's Profile Photo

    Tate modern

    by sylvie-uk Updated Sep 15, 2004

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    One ugly building viewed from outside!.
    One of Britains newest art museum. It openned in may 2000.
    It s housed in a converted power station.
    You can find modern art from the 19th century and work of young British artists of the late 20th and early 21st century.
    You can check the website below for more infos.

    tate modern
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  • ZanieOR's Profile Photo

    Elephant dropping art

    by ZanieOR Written Jan 23, 2005

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    We took the tube to Tate Modern, and it seemed like we had to walk quite a distance before we arrived at the museum.
    I enjoyed the variety of art -- some of it was pretty off-beat -- "modern" covers quite a range of time. As I recall the gallery was divided into sections. Art pieces that stand out in my memory (I should have written this tip sooner) included a piece by Dali featuring a lobster and a telephone, and a huge piece of an African woman with real-life elephant droppings artfully incorporated. It was actually quite an impressive painting.
    Admission was by donation.

    Tate Modern
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  • benidormone's Profile Photo

    The Tate Modern

    by benidormone Written Nov 2, 2004

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    If you like modern art be sure not to mis this. The place is huge, if you want to see everything you can stay here all day. The good part is also most of the exhibitions are free to visit. On the top floor of the building, in the restaurant, you have a magnificent view over London. Even if you don't like modern art this place is more than worthwhile visiting. The building used to be a power station and was transformed into a museum. The building itself is a real piece of art.

    Tate Modern

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  • scotlandscotour's Profile Photo

    Art - Free and Cool - The Tate Modern

    by scotlandscotour Written Jun 14, 2004

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    A regular haunt for me - escaping the city noise - and no commitment to stay - if you're bored - its free.

    Opens your mind and senses - which you'll have shut down to protect you from the noise, smells, dirt and traffic of the streets.

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  • planxty's Profile Photo

    I suppose it is all about taste.

    by planxty Updated Jul 22, 2009

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    I have lived in london for over 20 years and until last week I had never visited the Tate Modern. This is predominantly because I just don't get modern art. A couple of rows of house bricks on the floor? Art? I know there are many arguments about what constitutes art, and in an effort to be open-minded I am reading a good book now called "But is it art?" by Cynthia Freeland.

    Anyway, a very dear friend of mine is an art student. I recently assisted her in an art installation she had prepared for her end of term project, and very interesting it was. She has been nagging me for ages to visit with her. I thought having someone who knows about art might assist my understanding. Alas, not the case. In fairness, I did enjoy the Andy Warhol and Jeff Koons exhibits. I also loved the Monet painting, although how a work by a man who died in 1926 can be called modern is a little beyond me.

    Unfortunately, however, about 90% of what I saw I thought was complete garbage (almost literally in some cases). For example, one "installation" by Paul McCarthy consists of a room with several projectors in the middle. These project various overlapping images on the bare walls. As this is not an adult website I will refrain from describing a lot of them as they were extremely sexually graphic, but one of them consisted of a man punching himself in the head with boxing gloves on and another was of him vomiting. What this says about art or the world or whatever is beyond me, except that Mr. McCarthy can make a lot of money from the Tate.

    In fairness, my friend even admitted that a lot of it was nonsense. I am told this is one of the most respected modern art galleries in the world, but it will be a while before I venture back there. Ah well, at least it is free and the staff are helpful. The building itself is also very impressive.

    Tate Modern, London, UK.
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  • backpackerbaby's Profile Photo

    Surprises @ Tate Modern

    by backpackerbaby Updated Jan 9, 2004

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    I visited Tate Modern in this trip and I was shocked by the 'sunset' right after entering the museum. It's so amazing! The 'sun' is actually a half orange circle with its reflection from the mirror-ceiling. This design is really impressive and fantastic. During my visit, many visitors just lied in front of the 'sun' in the basement - a very relaxed environment. If you have time, you must go there to have a look.

    Apart from the sunset, there are several galleries exhibiting different paintings/drawings/sculptures of different topics. Among these, I liked the series of paintings named 'Sausage' of a German artist the most.

    "Free Admission" again!!!

    An indoor sunset, unbelievable?

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