Theatres, London

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    Signage
    by gordonilla
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    Exterior (1)
    by gordonilla
  • Theatre at the Scoop
    Theatre at the Scoop
    by Galaxy31
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    The Rose--The Elizabethan Theatre

    by Galaxy31 Updated Mar 7, 2015

    I had discovered Rose Playhouse when I have taken a tour of the Globe Theatre a few weeks ago, and I made a visit on Saturday which they have an open exhibition and it runs by volunteers.

    It was interesting to see or not to see the ruins of the theatre as its very dark and the whole ruins it’s submerged in water to keep it from cracking but they have a raised platform were you can see the red rope lights which indicate the site and size of the Rose (fourth photo). On the raised platform above the ruins they have the former stage which only fits maximum fifty people but you are very close with the actors. The area it’s very cold so if you do go to see a play make sure that you put an extra layer on but blankets are provided for hire at one pound each. They don’t have a bar or anything like that only tea and coffee are available and all plays don’t have intervals and only last ninety minutes. If you do need to use the toilets they advise you to go to Globe Theatre.

    The Rose Playhouse it was the first theatre that it was built on Bankside London in 1587 but the fourth that it was on the outskirts of London Wall by Philip Henslowe. It was built in an area which back then it was full of brothels, gaming dens and bull/ bear baiting arenas as all leisurely activities wasn’t allowed inside the London Walls. The Rose it was a two storey building with fourteen sides and a thatched roof and it was built on the river marshes.

    They have discovered the ruins of the theatre in 1989 during a routine exploratory excavation during the clearance of the site and re-development for an office block.
    When the discovery it was made public it had become a major International news story and ordinary people, actors and scholars they all campaigned to save it. The actor Lord Olivier gave his last dying public speech for the support of the Rose.
    It’s located just underneath Southwark Bridge and it’s not too far from the Globe theatre.

    The Rose exhibition it's free on Saturdays from 10.00am to 5.00pm but donations are welcome.

    The Rose Theatre The Rose Theatre Blue plaque of The Rose Theatre The red rope lights. The entrance
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    Ghost Stories Theatre

    by Galaxy31 Written Oct 23, 2014

    Ghost stories it was so different of any other theatre shows I have seen.
    The cast it was made up of just four members and the beginning of the show it was the end of it. It was only when it finished I have realised what the main star has gone through his life.
    It was a whole new experience to see a show like that but I still enjoyed it even at times I’m was a bit jumpy.
    It has lasted 90 minutes and it’s not intervals so they do ask audience to use the facilities before the start of the show as after you are not allowed to leave the show. You are allowed to take drinks in purchased from their bar.
    As we went during the week as tickets were much cheaper the theatre it wasn't in full capacity and the usher have told us to take the front seats in the upper circle which it was a good seating area.
    If you do like ghost and films that you don't know what it's larking around the corner I do recommended this one.

    Ghost Stories Theatre Ghost Stories Theatre Box Office In the theatre
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    The Proms - Royal Albert Hall

    by cleocat Written Sep 26, 2014

    If you are in London during the summer months, make an effort to attend one of the Prom evenings. If you don't want to pay around £50 for a ticket (some are cheaper), you can queue and get tickets for the standing area for only £5. Absolutely worth it.

    Proms at the Royal Albert Hall
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    Outdoor sunken theatre- The Scoop

    by Galaxy31 Written Aug 23, 2014

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    The Scoop theatre it’s located on the South Bank in More London and it’s next to the City Hall and it’s featured as one of the best six theatres in London.
    During the summer there are free shows from June until September. In June and July there are
    singing and dancing , August it’s theatre and in September it’s the cinema all performances are weather permitted.
    On some mornings from 7.30 to 8.30 there are free gym classes taken place.They do have a bar there when a performance it’s on but you can take your own drinks and you must have plastic cups, they also hire cushions because the seats are concrete and 50% of the hiring goes towards a charity.
    When I do go with friends we take our own picnic and we do enjoy a nice free evening by Tower Bridge.
    If the show it’s popular you need to get there early especially on Friday evenings.

    The Scoop Fringe at The Scoop Theatre at the Scoop Greek Play Theatre at the Scoop
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    National Theatre

    by spidermiss Updated Feb 27, 2014

    The National Theatre of Great Britain was founded in 1963 and currently resides at Southbank. The theatre complex was built during the 1970s. Opinions over the architecture of the building was mixed by leading celebrities and architects and despite of this the building has been listed as Grade II since 1994.

    The National Theatre hosts a eclectic range of plays varying from Shakespeare to modern ones. The National Theatre productions tours regionally as well as at Southbank in the West End. The company usual hosts up to three plays at one time which are performed in three auditoriums: Olivier Theatre (an open stage and seats up to 1,160 people); Lyttleton Theatre (with its proscenium-arch and seats up to 890 people) and The Shed (a temporary theatre space seating 225 people whilst the former Cottesloe Theatre auditorium is being refurbished and on reopening will be called Dorfman Theatre).

    As well as the theatres, the complex is open to the public with its theatrical shop, lounging area, restaurants, bars and exhibition spaces. Backstage tours are available and I participated in one in November 2012 (you can read about it here).

    I saw my first ever show at the National Theatre which was The Light Princess, which played at the Lyttleton Theatre, in January 2014. It was nice to have finally seen a show there and my friends and I had a coffee at The Shed's Cafe afterwards.

    The Shed and National Theatre, London The Shed at National Theatre, London The Shed and National Theatre, London National Theatre from Waterloo Bridge, London The Light Princess at the National Theatre
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    Best of the West End!

    by spidermiss Updated Feb 22, 2013

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    London is renowned worldwide for its theatre especially musicals. Most of the theatres include The Royal Opera House and The Coliseum are in the London's West End. You can go and see opera or ballet at The Coliseum; or a play at The Globe or at The Barbican Centre; or a musical at one of the West End's theatres.

    You pay an average of 65-67.50 GBP (for a top price ticket) to see a musical in The West End and around 90-100 GBP (for a top price ticket) to see an opera at The Coliseum. You can, however, purchase discounted tickets on the day either at the theatres themselves of at The Society of London's Half Price Ticket Booth at Leicester Square (Please see separate tip) or day tickets at selected shows.

    I'm a big theatre fan and the theatre is the main reason why I visit London!

    The Coliseum, London St Martin Lyceum Theatre, London London Palladium, London Wicked at Apollo Victoria, London
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    THE NATIONAL THEATRE

    by davidjo Written Dec 5, 2012

    Located on the south bank between Waterloo and Blackfriars bridge, the theatre contains three stages, which opened as they were completed in 1976/77. Performances include Shakespeare, new plays and international drama and the three auditoriums can put on 3 performances a day. There are restaurants and bookshops in the building which supplies extra income.
    Consult the website below for a schedule and tickets

    Three Auditoriums
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    VISIT THE THEATRE

    by davidjo Written Apr 8, 2012

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    While you are in London take the opportunity to take in a show.Theatre tickets are normally expensive but you can get a discount by visitingwww.officiallondontheatre.co.uk/buy-tickets/tkts/. Check out this website and see if there is anything of interest at half price or discounted, then you have to whip down to Leicester Square to their booth and buy the tickets in person.

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    The Mouse-trap, St Martins Theatre

    by Bonkers11 Written Feb 6, 2012

    This is a brilliant play, well, it must be, its been running for over 60 years. We booked tickets two weeks in advance for the Saturday matinee and there were only 8 seats left, the next day there were 6 by the time we arrived on the day I noted that the theatre was full.
    They don't open the bar too early but The Sussex round the corner on Long Acre is a great little pub to have a pre theatre drink
    The play is easy to follow, has a few cast members and is very well produced. The characters are all very interesting and in my opinion its easy to relate to and feel like you know them.
    The story is easy to follow, the plot is simple and it keeeps your attention all the way through.
    Defintely worth going to see.

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    Why not take in a London Theater District Show?

    by bpwarne Updated Dec 27, 2011

    We did and we had a great time. We saw an evening performance of 'Priscilla, Queen of the Desert - The Musical at the Palace Theatre. We really enjoyed just wandering around the district in the early afternoon trying to decide which show to see that evening. Tickets range from about $20 pound to over a hundred. There were still plenty of seats available at various prices for most shows even at the last minute. As a plus, the theater district is right next to the SOHO district and London Chinatown, so it's easy to explore all three areas in one afternoon.

    Palace Theatre, London Palace ?Theatre, London
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    The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridge

    by peaceness98 Updated Apr 4, 2011

    This was the funniest thing ever- and it actually made Shakespeare interesting for once!

    Three talented Americans (The reduced Shakespear Company) skimdown all sixteen comedies of Shakespeares into 2 hrs (With a short five minute exrtract at the end!), their funny, and the language is understandable and not gookily-ga.

    This comes HIGHLY recommended- better than your typical hollywood comedy. You'll also learn a thing or two.

    Times: Wed, Fri & Sat 20:00, Mats Thu 15:00, Sat 17:00, Sun 16:00

    Prices: ?10-?34.50

    Har Matey!
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    The Royal Shakespeare Company in London

    by cruisingbug Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Royal Shakespeare Company's production of Hamlet at the Barbican Theatre was truly a surprise. We knew we wanted to see a Shakespearean play on our trip to London - at only 10 pounds (back row, small theater), the RSC's production was, of course, the obvious choice. Hamlet has always been my favorite play, but I was surprised at the RSC take on it - very modernized, in a corporate world rather than old Denmark.

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    Theatre Museum - FREE

    by sourbugger Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    UPDATE : APRIL 2007. Now closed on the covent garden site, but much of the collection is now exhibited at the main V & A site in South Kensington.

    Dear luvvies,

    The Theatre Museum is spin-off of the V&A (Victoria and Albert). Because of this it is free!

    It has some excellent collections - if you have any passing interest in the theatre then it is a must. The exhibibtions are very well done, but pehaps lack 'impact' to some extent.

    There are original costumes, playbills and other paraphanlia to see as well as a magnificent 'box' saved from a theatre in Glasgow and a tribute to that most famous of English acting dynasties : the Redgraves.

    They also do performances, make-up demo's & other acting-type things.

    You don't need to be luvvie to understand it all - it's very well presented and it made me realise something....when you give a performance that is stunning in live theatre, only a few hundred people will ever see it, and the moment is gone. Give one on film and you will be immortalised. Deep eh ?

    I remember Guilgud said to me one fine evening in rep...trails off into longwinded story about as interesting as a guided tour of my shed.

    For Luvvies - theatre Museum
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    The Lion King

    by Durfun Written Mar 28, 2011

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    This is a great show for kids & adults alike.

    It's lovely how the cast walk thorugh the audience dressed as a variety of animals, like massive elephants, giraffes, etc, and on a few occasions they practically fill the whole room with birds flying around on poles.

    The story is lovely, with a nice moral too, showing how a father cares for his child & teaches him about the philosophy of life.

    The animals have interesting friendships & alliances, and there is a lot of humour thrown in for good measure throughout the show, often at the most unexpected times, enhancing the whole experience, and having you in stitches :-)

    The cast certainly deserve their ovation at the end. A truly joyous & memorable experience. Do attend & enjoy.

    *** Photography during the show is prohibited.

    The gorgeous interiors Looking towards the curtain.. All happy with anticipation.. Hypnotised by the curtain??
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    The London Coliseum

    by MM212 Updated May 7, 2010

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    Although still known as the London Coliseum, this prime London theatre officially changed its name to the Coliseum Theatre decades ago. When it opened in 1904, it was considered one of the best theatres of its time. For a while in the 1960s, it served as a cinema, but then returned to its original purpose in 1968 when the English National Opera moved in. The landmark building, with a globe carried on the back of sculptures of Herculean men, was designed by the architect Frank Matcham who was responsible for designing countless theatres around London.

    The London Coliseum - Apr 2009

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