Wellington Arch, London

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  • View of Constition Hill from Wellington Arch
    View of Constition Hill from Wellington...
    by spidermiss
  • Me at Wellington Arch
    Me at Wellington Arch
    by spidermiss
  • Wellington Arch, London
    Wellington Arch, London
    by spidermiss
  • spidermiss's Profile Photo

    Wellington Arch and Quadriga Gallery

    by spidermiss Updated Apr 13, 2014

    I often pass the Wellington Arch on the bus whenever I'm on my way to South Kensington from the West End. I have been meaning to visit and was able to do so on a recent London trip (April 2014).

    Wellington Arch was built in 1825-7 and originally intended as a victory arch celebrating the defeat of Napoleon by Wellington. However the arch was an aim to improve the royal parks (neighbouring Green and Hyde Parks). On top of the arch is Europe's largest bronze sculpture, 'Quadriga' which represents the Angel of Peace.

    One can go up to the top balconies and admire the city's landscapes including the parks and Constitution Hill and in the distance Houses of Parliament. We had an opportunity to see the Household Cavalry making their way from the Changing of the Guard to their Barracks at Hyde Park which was interesting to see.

    After enjoying the views I had a look round the 'Carscapes: How the Motor Car Reshaped England' in the Quadriga Gallery. I enjoyed the exhibition a lot more than I anticipated and it was interesting to see how the car has changed the physical and social landscape in this country forever.

    It costs 4.20 gbp (April 2014) to go up the Arch and visit the exhibition. Disabled visitors are able to go up in the lift and enjoy the views too. There is also a book and souvenirs shops. The property is owned by English Heritage.

    Wellington Arch, London Me at Wellington Arch Wellington Arch, London View of Constition Hill from Wellington Arch Carscapes Exhbition at Quadriga Gallery
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  • Regina1965's Profile Photo

    The Quadriga Gallery at the Wellington Arch.

    by Regina1965 Updated Apr 1, 2013

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    The Quadriga Gallery is an exhibition space at the Wellington Arch.

    When I visited in March 2013 there was an exhibition called "The General, The Scientist & The Banker: The Birth of Archaeology and the Battle for the Past".

    On the top floor are several photos of Britain´s prehistoric sites and the story told how they were saved from destruction. An Ancient Monuments Protection Act was made in 1882, which had on its schedule to save 68 monuments in Britain and Ireland, of which there were 26 in England. They claimed that the "very land was a museum". In 1913 the Ancient Monuments Consolidation and Amendment Act was made. That lead to the "National Heritage Collection" - Europe´s most ambitious outdoor museum (as it says in the brochure I got at the gallery). I had no idea that England had so many ancient monument and oddities, as it were. I had known about Stonehenge and some others, but that there are so many came as a surprise to me. This is why I love to visit museums and galleries in London, as I love to learn about England´s history.

    On the floor below there was an exhibition on Charles Darwin and a first edition of his book "On the Origin of Species". Plus many archaeological finds, f.ex. a flint handax and bones of destinct animals, which were found together in a quarry in 1859. On display is also the book "Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London" published by Joseph Prestwich in 1860 on the axes. There are some extraordinary finds there in display. Very informative indeed.

    In the corridor by the lift are drawings of indigenous communities and spears and clubs from the collection of Sir John Lubbock.

    Opening hours: Wednesday-Sunday from 10:00-17:00. Monday and Tuesday closed.

    Admission: GBP 4.

    Photos without flash are allowed.

    Prehistoric sites in Britain. The Pewter Chalice from Old Sarum. Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society. Charles Darwin. Drawings of indigenous communities.

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  • alyf1961's Profile Photo

    WELLINGTON ARCH

    by alyf1961 Written Feb 4, 2013

    Wellington arch was built in 1825-27 as a victory arch to commemorate Wellington’s defeat of Napoleon at the battle of Waterloo. The arch stands at Hyde Park Corner.
    On the top of the arch is a sculpture of the angel of peace descending on a four horse chariot of war, this is the largest bronze sculpture in Europe.
    It was designed by Decimus Burton and ordered in 1825 by King George IV.

    It was originally located right near the Apsley House, once the home of the first Duke of Wellington and now a museum displaying the duke’s life and work. It was moved to its present site at the end of the 19th century because the road needed to be widened to allow for traffic.
    Originally there was a statue of the Duke of Wellington on top of the arch
    designed by Matthew Coates Wyatt. Queen Victoria called it an eyesore. In 1912 the statue was moved to Aldershot.
    On top of the arch today is a sculptre called “The Quadriga”. Designed by Adrian Jones in honour of King Edward VII. The Quadriga is an angel of peace stood over a chariot of war.
    Inside the hollow arch is a 3 storey museum featuring the history of the arch. It once contained the second smallest police station in London. There is also a balcony which has good views over Hyde park.

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  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    WELLINGTON ARCH

    by balhannah Written Sep 8, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Wellington Arch is a triumphal arch named after the Duke of Wellington, who defeated Napoleon Bonaparte in 1815 at Waterloo. It was King George IV, who wanted the Arch built to commemorate the British victory in the Napoleonic Wars, and so it was built between the years 1826- 1830.
    On the top of the Arch, has been a few different statues. Finally, it was decided on the enormous bronze sculpture depicting the angel of peace who descends on the chariot of war, led by a small boy.

    Wellington Arch is hollow inside, and now houses a three-story museum that educates visitors on the history of the arch. There's also a balcony that allows good views of other nearby landmarks.

    Of interest, is that is once was a Police Station right up until 1992.

    Wellington Arch
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  • kris-t's Profile Photo

    Wellington Arch

    by kris-t Updated Jul 8, 2012

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    This gorgeous stone arch designed as an entrance to Buckingham Palace Commissioned by George IV, this splendid London landmark was originally designed in 1825 by the architect Burton, as a grand outer entrance to Buckingham Palace. Later, in 1882, the arch was moved to its present place. A statue of the Duke of Wellington on horseback was the first work of art to crown it, but its was too massive and was soon replaced by the present sculpture - the angel of peace descending on the chariot of war.

    The arch is currently home to a fascinating display - Lived in London: Celebration of Blue Plaques. This exhibition represent the history of Blue Plaques from 1866 to the present day.

    Adult :£3.00
    Children:£1.50
    Concession:£2.30

    (11)

    Wellington Arch the largest bronze sculpture in Europe
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  • Britannia2's Profile Photo

    Wellington Arch

    by Britannia2 Written Apr 2, 2011

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    A very impressive monument that was planned in 1825 to commemorate Englands victories in the Napoleanic wars. It was designed to be an impressive gateway in to London from the west.
    Now of course it stands in a very busy urgan area and is an isolated traffic island - traffic swirls around it but it is a small oasis in a busy area.
    The arch is hollow inside and owned by English Heritage. There are 3 floors of exhibits that show the history of the arch and at the top good views can be had over Hyde Park, Green Prk and even in to the gardens of Buckingham Palace.
    One side of the arch is actually a ventilation shaft for the Underground and so if you see smoke coming out of the top do not think the arch is on fire!
    The Arch is open from 10.00 to 17.00 and it costs £3.90 (April 11) with concessions possible, to visit the arch.

    Wellington Arch Wellington Arch
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  • gordonilla's Profile Photo

    Wellington Arch

    by gordonilla Written Dec 3, 2006

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    Set in the heart of Royal London at Hyde Park Corner. The Wellington Arch is a landmark which was originally commissioned by George IV as a grand outer entrance to Buckingham Palace. It was completed in 1830 by architect Decimus Burton, but was moved in 1882 to it's current location.

    The balconies just below the spectacular bronze sculpture offers a glorious view over London's Royal Parks and the Houses of Parliament. The statue is the largest bronze sculpture in Europe, and depicts the angel of peace descending on the chariot of war.

    The Wellington Arch

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  • Wellington Arch

    by grkboiler Written Nov 18, 2004

    The Wellington Arch was erected in 1828 on a small patch of land at Hyde Park Corner. It is dedicated to the Duke of Wellington and was once a ceremonial entrance to Buckingham Palace. There is a large statue of the Duke on the top. Traffic was rerouted around it in the 1960's and it now stands on its own little "island". There are exhibits inside the arch and stairs to an observation deck.

    The Duke of Wellington, Arthur Wellesley (1769-1852), was born in Dublin and was a general and later a statesman. His troops were responsible for the defeat of Napoleon at Waterloo. He also served twice as the Prime Minister.

    Admission is charged. It is open Wednesday to Sunday and hours are 10am - 6pm (April to September), 10am - 5pm (October), and 10am - 4pm (November to March).

    Wellington Arch

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  • kenyneo's Profile Photo

    Wellington Arch

    by kenyneo Updated Oct 8, 2004

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    A little history of the Arch

    Built in 1828 as a memorial to the Duke of Wellington, the arch has had a troubled history which entailed serving as a police station and being moved to its present location in Hyde Park Corner! It has now been handed back to the public after being revamped and offers visitors fine views across Green Park and St James's Park towards Big Ben and the South Bank

    My journey

    Saw the arch in a double decker . My first double decker tirp. Thats bus number 148 . It will also take you pass Marble Arch as well along Bayswater Street to my 1st drop off point Westminster !

    Dint take any pic of Marbel arch ..coz I was a little supirsed because it was not as huge as I have thought ..so in a flicker of a moment ..deciding whether to take a pic ..the bus whizzied off ....but I managed to take the Wellington Arch ....hehe

    Warning. The upper level of the double decker is quite hot and it can be little dizzy when the bus pass thru some uneven road .. :-)

    The Wellington Arc from a double decker
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  • sue_stone's Profile Photo

    Wellington Arch

    by sue_stone Updated Apr 15, 2004

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    Wellington Arch is a stone arch which was designed as an entrance to Buckingham Palace in 1825.

    The arch was dismantled and moved to its present site in 1882.

    You can catch the lift to the top of the arch for views across part of Hyde Park and Green Park. There are also 3 floors of exhibits that you can visit on the way back down, via the stairs.

    When we were at the top of the arch, the queens guards came along on horseback, rode through the arch and headed off to Buckingham Palace, for the changing of the guard.

    wellington arch, hyde park corner view from the arch view from the arch The Arch
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  • deeper_blue's Profile Photo

    Constitution Arch

    by deeper_blue Written May 9, 2010

    Constitution or Wellington Arch is between Hyde Park and Victoria it houses a sculpture of the angel of peace and chariot of war atop the arch. This is the largest bronze sculpture in Europe.

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  • Helga67's Profile Photo

    WELLINGTON ARCH

    by Helga67 Updated Dec 7, 2006

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    This monument was built in honour of The Duke of Wellington in 1828 as the northern gateway into Buckingham Palace. You can find it at the corner of Hyde Park where it is surrounded by traffic.

    Wellington Arch
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  • ginte's Profile Photo

    Wellington Arch

    by ginte Updated Oct 23, 2006

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    This monument was built in honour of The Duke of Wellington in 1828 as the northern gateway into Buckingham Palace. Now it is located in the middle of the trafic near Hyde Park Corner.

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  • bambino36's Profile Photo

    "Peace Triumphant and Quadriga"

    by bambino36 Written Sep 13, 2004

    On top of the Wellington Arch lies this statue representing Peace Triumphant and Quadriga.
    This statue was placed there in 1912 and was commissioned by King Edward VII.

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