Westminster Abbey, London

4.5 out of 5 stars 264 Reviews

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    Westminster Abbey, London
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    Westminster Abbey, London
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  • Westminster Abbey
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  • Dabs's Profile Photo

    Westminster Abbey-verger tour

    by Dabs Updated Apr 23, 2014

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    Westminster Abbey
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    Lat visit April 2014

    My last couple of visits have been in April 2014 and July 2011, both times there was a bit of a queue to get in but it went pretty fast. I highly recommend the Verger Tour, just an additional £3 per ticket. The 90 minute tour is very informative and allows you access into places that the ordinary tourists can't go.

    Admission is a little steep at £18, so I'd only recommend it if you have time for a proper visit. My niece was young enough to get an £6 ticket for under 18s, now £8.

    After the tour you can visit the museum or go back around the Abbey at your leisure. I believe they said the Abbey ticket was good for the entire day but ask when you get there.

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    Centuries of history

    by toonsarah Updated Mar 29, 2014

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    Update March 2014: information expanded and updated, new photos added

    Westminster Abbey should definitely be high on every visitor's must see list. I think is one of the two places in London where you get the greatest sense of the country's history (the Tower of London is the other). Here all British monarchs from 1066 onwards, with the exceptions only of Edward V and Edward VIII, have been crowned, many of them married and, until George II, buried. Its wealth of historic sights include the Coronation Chair, the Shrine of Edward the Confessor, the tomb of the Unknown Soldier, various Royal Tombs and the Royal Chapels.

    So many of Britain's great men and women are buried here: Chaucer, Spenser, Kipling, Dickens & Tennyson with other writers in Poets' Corner; Handel, Vaughan Williams & Purcell; Charles Darwin, Isaac Newton & Robert Stephenson; Dame Peggy Ashcroft & Sir Henry Irving ... Others are buried elsewhere but commemorated here: the Bronte sisters, Jane Austen, Shakespeare, Winston Churchill ... There is a full list of all who have monuments inside the abbey on the website: http://www.westminster-abbey.org/our-history/people

    The abbey is mainly Gothic in style, and its proper name is actually the Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster - but no one ever calls it that, and very few Londoners would even recognise the name! There has been a church on this site since 616AD but the present building was started in 1045 and much added too over the following centuries, being more or less finished in the 15th. There is a good history of the different phases of its construction on the abbey's website: http://www.westminster-abbey.org/our-history/the-architecture-of-westminster-abbey

    The Abbey is open to visitors on weekdays and Saturdays from 9.30-13.30 in winter months and 9.30-15.30 in the summer. Times vary a lot, so check the website below before you go - also if you'd like to attend a service. There is an entry charge of £18 (adults), £15 (students and 60+) and £8.00 (children 11-18 - under 11s go free). Prices include the use of an audio guide.

    On Sunday the abbey is open only for those attending a service. There is no charge then, so as well as being a special place to worship this offers an opportunity to see inside the abbey without paying! Times of services are on the website: http://www.westminster-abbey.org/worship/daily-services/general-service-times.

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  • jlanza29's Profile Photo

    Amazing is an understatement

    by jlanza29 Written Mar 1, 2014
    Just amazing !!!!!
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    I have been inside Westminster Abbey numerous times but I had always been to the free part. This time we had the time so we decided to enter of the east side and pay to see the rest. And wow … it was totally worth it.

    Admission price is a steep 18 pounds .. about $25 US. The price of admission is for the upkeep of this beautiful and symbolic building.

    Once inside the, no photos are allowed anywhere inside the Abbey and if you are caught taking a pix you will be asked to leave. We saw that happen twice during our visit. You can take pixs outside in the hallways and courtyards.

    The admission price includes an audio guide available in several major languages.

    The audio tour takes about 45 minutes, but you can go at your own pace.

    The sites inside are priceless and without a doubt beautiful. A must do for anyone visiting London.

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  • xoxoxenophile's Profile Photo

    Attend the Evensong service!

    by xoxoxenophile Written Sep 19, 2013

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    Westminster Abbey from beneath my umbrella
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    Westminster Abbey was a really great experience for us. We had the London Pass, but unfortunately ran out of time to go to Westminster Abbey with it... Going inside is very expensive, but we found out that on Sundays they don't allow tourists inside--you can only enter if you attend a church service (which is obviously free, though it fills up fast!). Upon our return to London from Paris (which was on a Sunday), we decided we should try to make a service at Westminster Abbey. We chose the 3:00 Evensong service, and got there early to ensure we could get in. The inside of the Abbey is beautiful, as you may imagine, but pictures are not allowed. I really enjoyed the service, especially because the choir, which was made up of all men and boys, sang really beautifully, and the sound resounded nicely throughout the Abbey. The sermon was good as well, and overall it was a nice experience. Nearby is St. Margaret's Chapel, which is also really pretty and free to visit. If you would like to visit Westminster Abbey, I definitely recommend going there for a service rather than paying for your visit.

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    Westminster Abbey

    by antistar Updated Jul 9, 2013

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    Westminster Abbey, London
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    A very royal abbey. Westminster Abbey is unusual in being under royal jurisdiction, a Royal Peculiar. More than that it is the church of the British Royal Family. Monarchs for almost thousand years have been coronated here, married here and eventually buried here. One famous non-Royal to be buried in Westminster Abbey was the arch Republican Oliver Cromwell, who was buried here despite years of protest against being made a king like figure (Lord Protector). His body no longer resides there, though, having been dragged out of its grave less than 20 years later and hung by the neck at the Tyburn gallows.

    Inside the Abbey is the coronation throne - King Edward's chair. It's the same throne that has been used for every coronation going back to 1308, with the exception of the Catholic queen Mary and her short lived namesake Mary II. The chair used to be seated over the Stone of Scone, a symbol of Scottish royalty (all Scottish monarchs are seated on the stone). Now it has returned to Scotland in Edinburgh castle, but returns here for coronations.

    The first Royal Wedding took place here in 1100, and while other locations have been used over the centuries, it became popular again to marry in Westminster Abbey. One notable exception to this pattern was the marriage of Prince Charles and Lady Diana, which took place at St Paul's Cathedral.

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    Westminster Abbey

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Jun 25, 2013

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    Westminster Abbey is a large Gothic church located just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. It is one of the most notable religious buildings in the United Kingdom, and is the traditional place of coronation and burial site for English, later British monarchs.
    The Abbey's two western towers were built between 1722 and 1745.
    Honouring individuals with Burials and Memorials in Westminster Abbey has a long tradition.
    Poets' Corner is the name traditionally given to a section of the South Transept of Westminster Abbey because of the good number of poets, playwrights, and writers buried and commemorated there.
    Unfortunately it was forbidden to take video there.

    You can watch my photo of London on the Google Earth according to the following coordinates 51° 29' 57.00" N 0° 7' 41.09" W or on my Google Earth Panoramio Westminster Abbey inside .

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  • Balam's Profile Photo

    Visit The Abbey

    by Balam Written Mar 5, 2013

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    One of the things we wanted to do while in London was visit Westminster Abbey, It is certainly worth visiting but we were disappointed and annoyed that after paying the £16 entrance fee and looking around for an hour we were told to leave as it was closing due to the Queen coming later, There was no notice outside to say so and we were not told when paying our Entrance fees, we had looked all around the church and cloisters but not the museum or shop which was most annoying,

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  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Central Hall

    by mikey_e Written Dec 29, 2012
    Central Hall
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    Central Hall is not likely going to be on your list of “must see” attractions in London, but it is very close to Westminster Abbey and Parliament, and thus is likely to capture your attention, even if it is only for a moment. The Hall, which once served as the headquarters of the Methodist Church in England, was constructed in the first decade of the 20th century in a complex that was, initially, an entertainment centre. In 1946, the Hall served as the site of the first meeting of the United Nations General Assembly, and was subsequently used as a meeting place for inquiries, political rallies and artistic events. The building itself is said to be in Edwardian style with Baroque elements, although the extravagance of typically Baroque buildings (think St. Paul’s Cathedral in the city) is certainly not present here – perhaps a nod to the traditionally austere Methodists. The dome is purported to be the second largest of its type in the world.

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    St. Margaret's Church

    by mikey_e Written Dec 11, 2012

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    St. Margaret's Church
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    St. Margaret’s Church is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site complex that includes Westminster Abbey and the Palace, although it does not benefit from the same sort of global recognition bestowed upon the Westminster brand. The Church is much simpler and more austere than its neighbor, and this is in fact why it was built. It was first constructed in the 13th century by Benedictine monks who wanted to have a parish church for Westminster that would be more in line with the expectations of the ordinary people who lived in the area, and so they built St. Margaret’s. It was rebuilt in the 15th and 16th centuries, again in an austere style, and was taken over by Puritans who wished to hold plain and unembellished services that allowed their followers in the parish to eschew what they considered to be decadent services in the nearby Abbey. The Church, which does not carry the same reputation as its neighbor, was the site of weddings for the aristocracy and of the burials of some of the country’s lesser leaders. It was also the site of a mass grave that became the final resting place of the remains of Parliamentarians, revolutionaries who opposed the monarchy in the 17th century and were initially buried inside the Abbey.

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    The State's Abbey

    by mikey_e Written Dec 11, 2012

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    The fa��ade of the Abbey
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    Although Westminster Abbey is technically part of the UNESCO World Heritage site that include the Palace of Westminster, i.e. Parliament, it is a monument in its own right. The first religious structure built here was erected over the course of the Norman Conquest in Romanesque style. This structure is not extent today, and was replaced in the middle of the 13th century by one ordered by Henry III, which was constructed in the Gothic style popular at that time. The Church was completed over the 13th and 14th centuries, and remained within the control of the Catholic Church and the Benedictines held sway. They were expelled during the dissolution of the monasteries in the 16th century, and allowed back into the Abbey for a brief period during the latter half of the 16th century, expelled later in the same century. Major additions to the Abbey were only made in the 18th century, when Gothic style was once again popular as part of a revival, helping to ensure the stylistic cohesion of the complex. Westminster Abbey is the traditional site of coronations for English and British monarchs, and part of this tradition holds that King Edward’s Chair, in which the Stone of Scone is kept, be used as the seat of the new King or Queen. The Stone was stolen briefly by Scottish nationalists in the 1950s, and in order to not inflame tensions it is now held in Scotland, although it is to be returned to the Abbey the next time a coronation occurs. The Abbey is also the site of royal weddings and funerals, as well as those of Prime Ministers and prominent Britons. In addition to the small Westminster Abbey museum, visitors are permitted to enter and view the Abbey itself (for a few, of course).

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    THE KING'S PRIVY WARDROBE

    by davidjo Updated Dec 6, 2012
    THE JEWEL TOWER

    The Jewel Tower was constructed in the 14th century in order for Edward III to store his treasures and is now an English Heritage property, and is only one of two buildings at Westminster Palace to survive the fire of 1834. The tower features the original ribbed vault, and there is an interesting display regarding the history of Parliament. On the second floor you can learn about the history of the Tower and is well worth a visit, although it is slightly hidden from the main tourist attractions nearby.
    It is open Nov - March from 10 am - 4 pm on Saturdays and Sundays only.
    They have not yet announced the times for next summer season.
    price adults $3.50 children £2.10

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    WESTMINSTER ABBEY---"must see"

    by davidjo Written Dec 4, 2012

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    WESTMINSTER ABBEY
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    Westminster Abbey is probably the most famous church in London and was briefly a cathedral in the 16th century. The abbey has been on that site since 624 A.D. but the present church was not started until 1245 under Henry III. In the present day Royal Weddings are held there. This is simply a must see.

    Opening times mon-fri 9.30-15.30, Sat 9.30-13.30
    Admission £15

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  • awladhassan's Profile Photo

    Westminster Abbey

    by awladhassan Written Oct 3, 2012
    Westminster Abbey
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    I took my children for a day in London, which is not nearly enough, but that was all the time we had . After visiting Trafalgar Square we walked down to Westminster Abbey. There was no time to go inside, but we were able to enjoy the workmanship involved in building this magnificent building.

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  • Jerelis's Profile Photo

    Westminster Abbey – Trip into memory lane.

    by Jerelis Written Oct 1, 2012

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    St Margaret's Church next to the Abbey.

    The Westminster Abbey has seen many Royal Weddings and Funerals through the years, in 2011 it was the venue for the wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton. It is great to see this wedding on television at home and realizing that I used to walk on that exact same spot. But I guess that works the same for every destination you have been to.

    But anyway Westminster Abbey is steeped in more than a thousand years of history. Benedictine monks first came to this site in the middle of the tenth century, establishing a tradition of daily worship which continues to this day. The Abbey has been the coronation church since 1066 and is the final resting place of seventeen monarchs. It also houses a library with a collections of archives, printed books and manuscripts. More than enough to tell about a magical place I visited way back in 1989. By than a teenager who wanted to have a good time in a metropolitan and right now writing this tip down on Virtualtourist being a 40 year young guy with a great trip back into memory lane! Enjoy.

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    Westminster Abbey – UNESCO Heritage Site.

    by Jerelis Written Oct 1, 2012

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    One of the pictures I saved :)
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    Funny thing about writing this tip in 2012 is that is just takes me back to 1989, how about that! I remember that Westminster Abbey is just a short walk from the Thames. It is definitely a must-see and I do remember it significant structure. This beautiful gothic church is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and is very popular with many visitors to London and so we also had to visit the amazing building.

    We were not able to go inside, not that we didn’t want to, but we were simply lacking the time. Visiting Westminster Abbey was just one of the highlights we visited in quite a rush. But what we did learn was that there are truly some well known people buried at the Abbey, for example Charles Dickens, Geoffrey Chaucer, Dr. Samuel Johnson and Charles Darwin. Besides that many Kings and Queens have been crowned on King Edward’s Chair, including the current reigning Queen Elizabeth II.

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